Inside Out and Back Again

The Life of Refugees in the Novel Inside Out and Back Again by Thanha Lai

November 8, 2021 by Essay Writer

A refugee can be anyone who is forced to flee their home due to conflicts such as war, famine, persecution and other disasters in order to preserve their life and freedom. After they escape the substantial danger, they must seek asylum in another country until they are finally relocated. While refugees flee home, their lives are turned “inside out”, as they wind through changes and deal with losses. In the novel, Inside Out and Back Again by Thanha Lai, a young girl named Ha and her family live in a war-torn Saigon, South Vietnam. Ha is a rebellious ten-year-old who, once every so often, likes to test the limits. Ha doesn’t have much of a position now because even though she remains hopeful that the war will soon be over so that life can return back to the way before, she has a grasp on the potential danger that this war brings. She appears naïve because of her age, but she knows more than what she lets on. As the war is approaching quicker and Saigon is close to its fall, Ha and her family board a ship, swarmed with countless other people, to America and is forced to abandon the only things she once knew and love. Ha comes across similar experiences that most refugees encounter; she had to confront the difficult changes throughout her journey until her life completely unraveled and turned “inside out”, then she shifted “back again” while slowly adjusting to new traditions of the place she began learning to call home.

Refugees’ lives are turned inside out when they are forced to escape to safety. These challenges that both refugees and Ha go through demonstrates the universal experience of refugees willing to do whatever it may take to get out of harms’ way. In “Children of War” by Arthur Brice, Emir, one of the four teenage refugees from Bosnia discusses the subject of how the war forced him into hiding from the bullets of the raging war. He says, “I had to crawl through my apartment on my hands and knees or risk getting shot. I slept in the bathtub for days, because that was the only place you were totally safe from bullets… You just want to survive this day” (Brice 25-26). This shows that at that point, Emir’s attention was only focused on safety; it didn’t matter if it meant he had to crawl on his hands and knees or sleep in a bathtub. On page one of Inside Out and Back Again, Ha is hiding from the war and its life-threatening accomplices. Ha tells about how the war has affected her daily life. “Maybe the whistles that tell mother to push us under the bed will stop screeching” (Lai 4). Ha’s mother is doing anything in her power to keep her children from danger, by having them take cover underneath a bed at the sound of a whistle, to keep away from the soldiers. In the poem, “Saigon Is Gone”, Ha writes the circumstances they’re forced into, at sea, just to stay out of the Communist’s sights. “The commander has ordered everyone below deck… avoiding the obvious path through Vung Tau where the communists are dropping all the bombs they have left… our ship dips low as the crowd runs to the left, and then to the right” (Lai 67-68). Desperate times call for desperate measures; this indicates that everyone including Ha’s family are willing to endure the harsh conditions just to get away from the dangers of the war. War pushes people to the point of desperation and where their only existing thoughts are invaded by safety. Little things that would usually worry them aren’t even relevant during the current situation. Once the soldiers showed up in her neighborhood, Ha recognized that her life was being turned inside out –that maybe her home was no longer the place she felt safest and the possibility that she was going to have to find and adapt to a new one.

Refugees that are finally relocated must adjust to the traditions of the new country. This can be difficult for some refugees, and even harder for those experiencing an exchange of obligations where the role of the parent and child switches. In “Refugee Children of Canada: Searching for Identity” by Ana Marie Fantino and Alice Colak, expresses that “At home both groups experience a role and dependency reversal in which they may function as interpreters and cultural brokers for the parents” (Fantino and Colak 591). This means that the responsibilities that the child and parent once held are no longer in the same hands, instead of the child depending on the parent, the parent now depends on the child. This universal refugee experience relates back to Ha in the poem, “English Above All”. Ha writes, “Until you children master English you must think, do, wish for nothing else. Not your father, not your old home, your old friends, not our future” (Lai 117). Ha’s mother wants their focus to be on school so that they can be educated since, now, their mother relies on them therefore their priorities are going to have to alter along with their new life. Taking on the big responsibility where the role of the parent shifts to the child can turn the child inside out due to all the pressure. In, “Passing time”, Ha is aware that if she doesn’t do anything at all it doesn’t benefit anyone else, including herself. “I study the dictionary because grass and trees do not grow faster just because I stare” (Lai 129). This is an example of Ha hard at work because she knows that the world doesn’t stop changing because she isn’t doing anything, nothing changes (especially for her) if she doesn’t put in the effort. In a way, Ha is repaying her mother by learning and adapting herself so that she can eventually help her mother adapt to the new country. It’s already difficult enough to arrive to a new country without any prior knowledge, it’s even more difficult when you pile on the demanding challenges of having to adopt a new culture and no longer being able to adhere to your old culture, then becoming the support for your parent. Learning to make a life in a new place can be a struggle for all refugees.

Once refugees learn to reach the point of acceptance of change in their lives, not only does their life begin to get easier but society also acknowledges them as equals. In “Refugee Children of Canada: Searching for Identity” by Ana Marie Fantino and Alice Colak, it states “This may be attributed to a long-held belief that children adapt quickly, bolstered by the tendency of children to not express their sadness.” This interprets that children are usually known for their ability to adapt quickly. With the ability to return back faster, children have a less difficult time compared to adults, of turning back again. “Not the same, but not bad at all” (Lai 234). Ha may have not been able to bring her papaya tree with her to this new place, but she brought the accepting part of herself and it began to emerge here. She longs for her home when she encounters things that remind her of Vietnam but she’s starting off to approve the diverse changes in her life now. In “1976: Year of the Dragon”, Ha describes that this year there is no longer a I Ching Teller of Fate to read their fortune for the year so, their mother makes do of the situation and predicts it instead. Ha’s mother predicts, “Our lives will twist and twist, intermingling the old and the new until it doesn’t matter which is which” (Lai 257). Ha is making friends –growing closer with Pem and adopting the new culture. By incorporating new traditions into the old traditions, it would make it easier on the refugees to adapt. Many factors affect the rate of how fast refugees turn back again; acceptance is one of the crucial factors and Ha was able to grasp the idea and begin to accept change.

Throughout the world, refugees come across many challenges as they are forced to flee their country as well as in search of a new place to call home. As refugees like Ha’s family risk their lives during this transforming journey, they learn to overcome their past experiences and adjust to their new lives within an unfamiliar environment. The novel, Inside Out and Back Again demonstrates that a person, over time, may turn inside out but can conquer that and revert back again.

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The Refugee Experience in Inside Out & Back Again by Thanhha Lai

November 8, 2021 by Essay Writer

Throughout history countries have been going through war, whether its country turning against country, or the country turning against their own people. In the novel, Inside Out & Back Again we learn how a girl named Ha and her family go through the refugee experience. The novels title, Inside Out & Back Again, relates refugees feeling to “inside out” by them going through hardships, yet they come “back again” when they create a new life in their new community. Ha’s experience connects to the universal refugee by them both going through hardships, and having to create a new life for themselves.

I Have No Choice But To Run

Refugee’s lives are turned “inside out” when they flee their homelands because of the hardships of war around them. During the Vietnam War the Vietnamese are trying to flee because of the war which is very hectic, chaotic, and hard for them. This was what Ha and her family sadly had to go through on their trip to America. In the article, Panic Rises in Saigon but the Exits Are Few it says, “Panic is clearly visible in Saigon now as thousands of Vietnamese try desperately to find ways to flee their country.” Fleeing is hard for the Vietnamese because everyone is panicking and trying to leave as fast as possible. Ha went through the hardship of having to live on a malnourished boat on her escape to America. In the poem One Engine in Inside Out & Back Again on page 88 it states, “The commander decides the ration is now half a clump of rice only at morning and night, and one cup or water all day.” They have lowered the ration of rice, which means they will be fed even less food, and a lower amount of water. Once Ha and the rest of the people get to a tent island called Guam they get limited to the amount of the good food they get since no one wants to eat the nasty slop that is plentiful. In the poem Tent City in Inside Out & Back Again on pages 96-97 it states, “We eat only canned fruit in thick syrup, and everyone wants extras but we only get one cup.” The people are very hungry and want more fruit since the other food it unappealing, but they can’t have more than the limitation of one cup. Altogether you can see that refugee’s lives get turned “inside out” when they flee their homelands because of what’s happening to the community around them.

Mother Thinks of Everything

The lives of refugees turn “back again” when they are able to create a new life for themselves in their new community. A lot of refugees get resettled into new countries for better lives. In the text, Refugees: Who, Where, Why? states, “Millions of refugees have been successfully resettled in ten established resettlement countries.” Refugees get resettled and are able to restart their new life in resettlement countries that allow them to pursue a better lifestyle. Ha and her family get a new home in America thanks to their sponsor from Alabama who gets it for them. In the poem American Address in Inside Out & Back Again on page 124 it states, “Our cowboy in an even taller hat finds us a house on Princess Anne Road, pays rent ahead three months.” The cowboy gets them a house so they can live on their own and begin their new life in their own house instead of his basement. Ha and her family will all be out of the house either at school or work pursuing their new life. In the poem The Outside in Inside Out & Back Again on page 136 it tells, “Starting tomorrow everyone must leave the house.” Ha and her family will be at work and school to get an education or money so that they can do better their new life. It has been shown that, the lives of refugees turn “back again” when they create a new life for themselves.

The book Inside Out and Back Again connects fleeing to being “inside out” since the war makes them leave their home, and then they are able to come “back again” by creating their new life. Ha’s experience likened to the universal refugee experience due to going through hardships, having to start from completely nothing, and having to rebuild a new life for themselves and their family. Although refugees go through the worst, they make history that continues to be praised throughout generations of their family after them.

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Depiction Of Refugees’ Struggles In Inside Out And Back Again By Thanhha Lai

November 8, 2021 by Essay Writer

The universal refugee experience of fleeing and finding homes was very difficult for refugees. A refugee can be anybody that is forced to flee their homes due to conflicts, wars and more. In the novel “Inside Out and Back Again” by Thanhha Lai tells readers how refugees struggle during their daily life. The main character of the story is a 10-year-old girl named ha.

Ha and her family lived in between the Vietnam War. Ha Is rebellious and pushes some boundaries but always has a family on her side. Ha is very optimistic by hoping that the war will end or move away from danger. When things get out of hand ha’s mother decides that their family must flee to America and find freedom. Ha and her family had to deal with sadness and loss of other refugee families. Ha also dealt with changing her lifestyle which is inside out when leaving Saigon, then shifted back when finding a new home in Alabama, but will never be the same as her old home.

The lives of refugees turn inside out when losing their home or family members and trying to adapt to their new environment. Refugees come from a country at war, which means that many families had to deal with the loss of a family member. In the article “Refugee Children Of Canada” Says that “some have lost so many family members of their families and many have lost everything that was familiar to them.” Losing loved ones and having things that are taken away from you could really turn your life inside out especially if you have nobody to lean on. When refugees start to lose family members, they start to think there’s no meaning in life. In the text “Children Of War” Amelia said “Before the war I really enjoy life. But after I found out about my father’s death, everything seems so useless I couldn’t see any for my future.” Knowing you lost a loved one at the wrong time could really change your whole mood and perspective. In the book “Inside Out and Back Again” Ha was living without her father for 10 years. She always thought that he will come back, this changed when ha found out that her father was dead. Page 250 says “ your father is truly gone.” This changed ha’s life before she even got to meet him. Ha had to adjust towards the news, meanwhile, ha felt like her life was flipped inside out. There are many ways that refugee lives could be flipped inside out.

Refugees are used to being at the place where everybody culture is pretty much the same. When refugees began to reset their lifestyle, surroundings and other things impact their lives. It’s heart-wrenching adjust towards a new environment with more than one culture and really none of yours. In the text “Refugee Children In Canada,” it says “perhaps the greatest threat to children is not the stress of belonging to two cultures but the trailer belonging to none.” Once refugees are in a different environment they have to adapt towards it. It could be very difficult for some people during this event. In the novel, Ha was thinkin “No one would believe me at times I would choose wartime in Saigon over peacetime in Alabama.” Ha is feeling like she doesn’t belong in America because she doesn’t know anything about America and doesn’t fit in. Page 142 says “I am the only straight black hair and olive skin.” Ha does not know where she fits in her school. Page 143 Ha says “On one side of the bright, noisy room, light skin. On the other side, dark skin. Both laughing, chewing as if I never occurred to them, someone medium would show up.” This identity as not belonging to your environment and it would take time to fit in. Refugees have a very difficult time in general because of losing family and plus not fitting in.

Many people around the world have to leave behind things that they only knew for their own safety. Refugees faces all kinds of challenges when fleeing and finding homes and during their sad and heartbreaking journey. In all there are many challenges when living a refugee daily life.

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The Challenges Faced By Refugees In Inside Out And Back Again By Thanhha Lai

November 8, 2021 by Essay Writer

A refugee can be any person who has left their home because they are afraid for their safety if they stay. Once refugees leave home, they have to find asylum in another country until they can resettle into a new home. When refugees flee, their lives twist and turn inside out because of all the changes they go through and everything they leave behind or lose. This is very challenging for many people to go through; as soon as refugees resettle, their lives start to turn back again when they move past the changes and their host community works with them as peers and equals. In the novel Inside Out & Back Again by Thanhha Lai, Ha and her family are living in the middle of the Vietnam War. Ha is 10 years old and likes to push boundaries while being three steps behind her mother at all times. Ha doesn’t know what to think about her situation; she is hopeful that the war will end or at least move away from her home, but she is not naive and understands the dangers that come with living in a country divided by war. When it becomes too much to handle Mother decides that their family must flee to America and find asylum there. Ha and her brothers have to deal with the sadness and emptiness that many refugees face. Ha goes through the process that most other people who flee their homes go through: she had to deal with her life changing until it was inside out when leaving, then she got to experience it shifting back again while finding a new home.

Refugees’ lives turn inside out when having to deal with the loss of family and trying to adapt to a new culture; these challenges lead to the longing of being back in their home country. Refugees come from a country at war, this means that many families have had to deal with the loss of loved ones. In the text “Refugee children in Canada,” it was said that “Some have lost many family members and many have lost everything that was familiar to them”. Losing everything you have ever known would turn your life inside out especially when you don’t have any family to lean against. When refugees lose family members, they start to feel that their lives have no meaning any more. In the “Children at War” text, Amela said, “Before the war I really enjoyed life. But after I found out about my father’s death, everything seemed so useless I couldn’t see any future for myself”. Learning that you have lost someone who you loved would change your life dramatically because you no longer have the connections and safety you had when that person was still alive. In the novel “Inside Out and Back Again,” Ha was living without her father for most of her life. She had always thought that he would come back; this changed when she found out he had been killed. In the book Mother said, “Your father is/ truly gone”. This changed Ha’s life: before she had always had a father that had been captured, now she knows she doesn’t have someone to protect their family the way a father is supposed to. Once Ha learned that her father had died, she had to take some time to adjust to the news; during this time Ha felt her life was being flipped around, turned inside out. There are other things though that will turn a refugee’s life inside out, including needing to adapt to a new culture.

Refugees that resettle have to adapt. This can be very hard for some people. In the novel Ha wrote: “No one would believe me/ but at times I would choose wartime in Saigon over peacetime in Alabama” (Lai 195). Ha is feeling alone because she does not know about anything in America and she is really lost like the rest of her family. Ha may also feel that she has lost the part of herself that was loyal to the country and stayed there to watch the war. Ha is not alone in feeling this way. Amela in “Children of War” stated, “Sometimes I wish I’d stayed there, watching the war, rather than being here, safe, but without friends”. This is the same feeling of not wanting to let go of your home and everything you once knew. It can be really frustrating learning to become part of a new culture. As Ha was learning English, she was annoyed at all of the rules and referred back to when she was in Vietnam and how the language there worked. Ha wrote: “A an and the do not exist in Vietnamese and we understand each other just fine” (Lai 167). Learning a new language can be challenging, but once refugees start accepting the changes that they have gone through their lives start turning back again.

When refugees learn to accept the change in their lives and the host community acknowledges them as equals, their lives start to turn back again. Refugees have to accept change and let go of things that they once had in order to move on. Many refugees will mourn their losses and then move on with their lives. “Refugee Children in Canada” said exactly that: “It is not only natural that refugee children, along with their families, go through a process of mourning those losses”. The mourning process is a time of grieving then moving past the loss of something or someone special. When Ha moved to Alabama she mourned the loss of her home and everything she left, but when she started getting replacements she made do with what she had. She wrote, on multiple occasions, “Not the same, but not bad at all” (Lai 234). Ha was letting go of her possessions but also bringing her culture into the mix; this was her way of moving on. Ha’s family celebrated Tet, a traditional Vietnamese holiday, while they were in Alabama. During this celebration, Ha’s mother predicted something that would start to put their lives back again. She said, “Our lives will twist and twist intermingling the old with the new until it doesn’t matter which is which”. Letting go of some of the old traditions and adding in some new ones would make a refugee’s life feel like it was on track more or less. Learning to move on will really help a refugee start to fit in and have a more normal life, but when the people in the host community start accepting refugees, it will make them feel so much more included in society.

Once members of the host community start treating refugees as equals, then everyone will become equal. In “Children of War,” Amela explained how the people in America treated her as a peer instead of someone who needed extra help in simple matters. When she came to America she noticed something about the people here: “Here, people don’t judge you…”. No one treated her differently because she is Muslim or Bosnian. She also saw that people want to help even if they don’t understand: “Some people here don’t even know where Bosnia is, but they’re really nice and try to help”. Amela’s host country excepted her which made it easier and faster for her life to turn back again. In Ha’s case, she was not excepted as quickly into her host community. One girl named Pam (Ha says Pem) helped Ha to fit in better by treating her as an equal. In the novel Ha wrote, “Pem shrugs. I can’t wear pants or cut my hair or wear skirts above my calves; what do I care what you wear?”. Pam said this all to Ha, treating her like she would treat anyone else. Many factors play into how fast your life turns back when you are a refugee.

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Refugee Experience In Thanhha Lai’s Inside Out And Back Again

November 8, 2021 by Essay Writer

Throughout history countries have been going through war, whether its country turning against country, or the country turning against their own people. In the novel, Inside Out & Back Again you learn how a girl named Ha and her family go through the refugee experience. The novel’s title, Inside Out & Back Again, relates refugees feeling to “inside out” by them going through hardships, yet they come “back again” when they create a new life in their new community. Ha’s experience connects to the universal refugee by them both going through hardships, and having to create a new life for themselves.

‘I have no choice but to run.’ Refugee’s lives are turned “inside out” when they flee their homelands because of the hardships of war around them. During the Vietnam War the Vietnamese are trying to flee because of the war which is very hectic, chaotic, and hard for them. This was what Ha and her family sadly had to go through on their trip to America. In the article, Panic Rises in Saigon but the Exits Are Few it says, “Panic is clearly visible in Saigon now as thousands of Vietnamese try desperately to find ways to flee their country.” Fleeing is hard for the Vietnamese because everyone is panicking and trying to leave as fast as possible. Ha went through the hardship of having to live on a malnourished boat on her escape to America. In the poem One Engine in Inside Out & Back Again on page 88 it states, “The commander decides the ration is now half a clump of rice only at morning and night, and one cup or water all day.” They have lowered the ration of rice, which means they will be fed even less food, and a lower amount of water. Once Ha and the rest of the people get to a tent island called Guam they get limited to the amount of the good food they get since no one wants to eat the nasty slop that is plentiful. In the poem Tent City in Inside Out & Back Again on pages 96-97 it states, “We eat only canned fruit in thick syrup, and everyone wants extras but we only get one cup.” The people are very hungry and want more fruit since the other food it unappealing, but they can’t have more than the limitation of one cup. Altogether you can see that refugee’s lives get turned “inside out” when they flee their homelands because of what’s happening to the community around them.

‘Mother thinks of everything.’ The lives of refugees turn “back again” when they are able to create a new life for themselves in their new community. A lot of refugees get resettled into new countries for better lives. In the text, Refugees: Who, Where, Why? states, “Millions of refugees have been successfully resettled in ten established resettlement countries.” Refugees get resettled and are able to restart their new life in resettlement countries that allow them to pursue a better lifestyle. Ha and her family get a new home in America thanks to their sponsor from Alabama who gets it for them. In the poem American Address in Inside Out & Back Again on page 124 it states, “Our cowboy in an even taller hat finds us a house on Princess Anne Road, pays rent ahead three months.” The cowboy gets them a house so they can live on their own and begin their new life in their own house instead of his basement. Ha and her family will all be out of the house either at school or work pursuing their new life. In the poem The Outside in Inside Out & Back Again on page 136 it tells, “Starting tomorrow everyone must leave the house.” Ha and her family will be at work and school to get an education or money so that they can do better their new life. It has been shown that, the lives of refugees turn “back again” when they create a new life for themselves.

The book Inside Out and Back Again connects fleeing to being “inside out” since the war makes them leave their home, and then they are able to come “back again” by creating their new life. Ha’s experience likened to the universal refugee experience due to going through hardships, having to start from completely nothing, and having to rebuild a new life for themselves and their family. Although refugees go through the worst, they make history that continues to be praised throughout generations of their family after them.

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Representation Of Children Refugees In Inside Out & Back Again And Children Of War

November 8, 2021 by Essay Writer

Throughout history, millions of people across the world have gone through the universal refugee experience of fleeing their countries, and finding a new home in societies abroad. A refugee is someone who is forced to flee from their home country to escape conflict or danger. Refugees must search for asylum in countries abroad, losing almost everything familiar. In “Children of War” by Arthur Brice, and “Inside Out & Back Again” by Thanhha Lai, you learn about the experiences of young children forced to flee their homes due to war and disaster. Thanhha Lai’s novel, “Inside Out & Back Again” centers around 10 year old Ha and her family. As the Vietnam War grows dangerously close to their home in Saigon, they are forced to flee from the country, twisting their lives inside out. After spending months in a crowded refugee camp, Ha’s mother concludes that her family should attempt to find a new home in America. Ha and her family must cope with the universal refugee experience of having their lives twisted inside out, before slowly being turned back again when they manage to find a new home. When refugees are forced to leave home, they lose almost everything: their family, country, culture, and even their identity. Their lives will only begin to turn back again when they create a new home for themselves, and their peers and remaining family help them regain hope.

The lives of refugees are turned inside out when they lose everything they once had, including their culture and their country. After fleeing from their home countries, they must cope with the fact that they may never be able to return home. In the rising action of the novel Inside Out & Back Again, Ha and her family are fleeing from Vietnam on a large boat that has been packed with other refugees. The commander of the boat begins to speak in front of the boat’s passengers, delivering news that manages to twist the lives of everyone even further. To the refugees’ dismay, he becomes the bearer of bad news, stating: “It’s over, Saigon is gone.” At this point, the refugees have not only lost their home, their home has been destroyed. The North Vietnam forces took control of South Vietnam, bringing the entire country into the grasp of a communist government. The lives of Ha and her family were now destroyed. They had lost their country, and would not be able to return any time in the near future, and possibly not even for the rest of their lives. In many cases, refugees may flee from their countries due to a malicious government or violent groups that have managed to invade the country. In Children of War, when asked how his father had been killed, Emir talks about how his home had been taken over by the Serb army. He says, “They came into our homes and said they had established a new government.” (Brice, 26) They were forced to flee because it had been taken over, and a new government had been created in their home country. Before they had even escaped their country, they had already lost their home when it had been invaded. Refugees must mourn the loss of their countries, after they lose their homes due to threatening and dangerous conflicts. They must escape from their countries and find new homes, all while coping with the loss of their identities, and their family members.

The lives of refugees are turned inside out when they lose their families. The loss of a parent or sibling is devastating, especially at a time where refugees need their families most. They must find new homes in completely different countries, even if they are already suffering from the loss of a loved one. In Inside Out & Back Again, Ha lost her father to the same conflict she was forced to escape from. Nine years before Ha, her brothers, and her mother fled South Vietnam, their father, who worked in the navy, had been captured by the north. Ha did not fully come to peace with this loss for years, and held onto her hope that her father was still alive, not knowing he was dead. Ha explains her father’s capture and disappearance, writing, “Father left home on a navy mission on this day nine years ago when I was almost one. He was captured on Route 1 an hour south of the city by moped. That’s all we know.” (Lai, 10) Ha lost her father before she could ever get to know him. He had been killed during the Vietnam War, the war that forced Ha and her remaining family to escape from the country nine years later. Many young refugees lose parents to the wars in their home countries. When young refugees lose their families, it can destroy them, especially since they are still children. Many will lose the little hope they had left, and cannot see how their lives could possibly get better. In Children of War, when asked how the war changed her life, Amela described the impact that her father’s death had on her. She said, “But after I found out about my father’s death, everything seemed so useless. I couldn’t see any future for myself.” (Brice, 26) Because of the war in Bosnia, Amela lost her father in a concentration camp created by the Serb army. All hope Amela had of seeing her father again had been destroyed. His death had such a large impact on her, that she lost all hope for the future as well. She couldn’t see how she could continue without her father. When refugees lose members of their families, they may give up on everything, as their entire world has been shattered. This can make it much harder for them to turn their lives back again, now that they must mourn their losses.

The lives of refugees finally begin to turn back again when they create a new home for themselves, and their peers and remaining family help them to regain hope. Refugees can finally hope for a brighter and better future when they learn to live in their new homes, and manage to adapt to the new culture. At the very end of Inside Out & Back Again, an entire year has passed since the beginning of the novel. It is now Tet again, and Ha is praying for what she wants to happen in this New Year. She is having trouble with her wishes, before deciding, “I think and think, then close my eyes again. This year I hope I truly learn to fly-kick, not to kick anyone so much as to fly.” (Lai, 259) After her entire life was turned inside out, Ha has now found a new home in Alabama. With the help of her handful of friends at school, her teachers, and her family, Ha has finally managed to find hope. She now looks forward to the future, and can see that everything is now behind her. She can now start over in her new home, without fear. In Children of War, Amela explained how her life had been turned inside out when she became a refugee, and found asylum in America. After starting school once again, and having her life in Bosnia behind her now, she can finally see a future for herself in America. When asked about her life in America, she says, “America is giving us a chance for a better future than we could have in Bosnia.” (Brice, 26) Amela lost all hope for her future when her father passed away in a concentration camp, but now that she has started a new life in America, she has gained hope. Her family, and her start at school have helped her, as does not have to worry about the danger in Bosnia. She is now safe in America, where she has created a new home with her mother and brother.

When refugees are forced to leave home, they lose practically everything: their family, country, culture, and even their identity. When they create new homes in countries abroad, they will finally begin to regain hope, and see a future for themselves, with help from their remaining family and peers. Refugees suffer through many terrible things, but with the help of others around them, they will be able to find the hope they need. When someone becomes a refugee, it may take a long time, but they will find a new home, despite everything they’ve lost.

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The Admirable Qualities of Mahatma Gandhi as a Leader

November 8, 2021 by Essay Writer

Mahatma Gandhi was one of the most influential leaders in all human history, by his devoted efforts he not only succeeded where many other actual leaders of India failed in convincing the British to leave, but he also managed to stop all fighting between Muslims and Hindus both of these he achieved without the use of violence. Within his lifetime Gandhi practiced very successfully a Transformational leadership style, he worked to inspire others to stand up and act believing that even the common man could make a difference (Gupta, A.)

Hamilton describes those with the transformational leadership style as “leaders who transformed society with their visions; that is charismatic leaders who have the ability to inspire and motivate people to do more than they would normally dodespite obstacles and personal sacrifice”. (Hamilton, C.) Looking at Gandhi’s life we see a man who devoted his entire life to the well-being of his country, and the people that lived there. When attempting to assess Gandhi’s success as a leader it becomes important to look at how he thought and his capabilities as a problem solver. The best example of this came early on with how he approached the issue of freeing India from British control. Hundreds of other national leaders before him tried, and failed to remove the British from India, meaning a conventional approach to the issue wouldn’t work, Gandhi realized this early on in his campaign, and it lead Gandhi to look at the issue differently than others before him. He looked to see what reason the British had for their continued presence in India despite having long since taken all of the treasure and riches they could. The answer he came up with was that it was India’s new dependence on European goods that kept the British interested in India. This was a critical discovery as the existence of an economic reason behind Britain’s continued existence in India made the most effective method of removing the British non-violent actions, India would not earn its freedom through war and violence, and in realizing this Gandhi was able to establish his purpose as a leader which was freeing India. With a purpose he came up with a plan to “break the economic purpose of colonialism” through non-violent means which he could be easily spread to the masses. Through his words Gandhi managed to align himself with the common man, gaining their trust and motivating the entire populous to act against Britain in non-violent protest by practicing self-reliance, and non-cooperation. These two things are what he based his leadership on, and by his teachings he convinced everyone to join him to the point where even those who truly believed that they had nothing to offer, and could truly do nothing in the face of the British empire joined in and followed his teachings. This was largely because his teachings were simplistic enough that anyone could follow them, yet also impactful enough that those following felt that they were truly a part of something much bigger than themselves, the struggle for freedom. (Gupta, A.)

A closer look at Gandhi as a person sheds more light onto his success as a leader. Entering into this issue Gandhi had already established a good measure of credibility with the people of India through his success in South Africa where he championed his non-violent methods proving them to be effective to all those who paid attention. This attributed a good deal to the willingness of people to follow him, but this was not the only thing that drew people to Gandhi, nor was it what made him such a beloved figure to Muslims and Hindus alike. Looking at Gandhi’s everyday life it’s as though we are looking at the life of one of his followers, he practiced his preaching to the letter even spinning his own wool for clothes he lived a simple life as the poor did, and in doing so he established a bond with his followers. Coupled with his many speeches given to the public across all of India establishing himself as an easily accessible person Gandhi became a leader so great that the common man could connect to him simply by seeing him. (Gupta, A.) Connected to his way of living were the qualities he possessed, ten of which that stand out to be most important to his success as a leader. Faith in self, this quality afforded Gandhi with long term vision which coupled with his strong principles of righteousness made him one of the great transformational leaders of history. Resistance and persistence; while some might have believed this to be his stubbornness, it was in fact a key part of what allowed him to continue his non-violent actions despite the naysayers who claimed that violence was the only way to accomplish anything. Forgiveness, the capacity to learn from mistakes, strength of character, love but never hate, truthfulness, live in the present, take the first step and do it anyway, and non-violence. (Sharma, A.) Each of these qualities combined were what made Gandhi the ability to not only inspire and motivate those around him to do more than they would normally do, but also served to make him every bit as approachable as a neighbor, or even friend for all those who followed him.

Gandhi’s goal of attaining freedom for India from the colonial rule of Britain were eventually realized, but the victory was short lived as there was a brewing civil war between the Muslims and Hindus of India threatening to destroy India from the inside out, and potentially even provide an opportunity for another European nation to take control over India again putting the country right back where they started. This news led Gandhi to continue in his role as a non-violent leader, traveling across India promoting peace, and trying to stop the fighting and rioting that was occurring, ultimately Gandhi was against a divided India and wanted to see Muslims and Hindus live together in peace, but alas he was shot and killed by a Hindu fanatic during one of his prayer meetings. In spite of this, the great sorrow of both Muslims and Hindus alike following his death quelled the fighting, and is likely the only reason that India didn’t tear itself apart from the inside through a massive civil war. (Biography: Gandhi Back in India)

Finally looking at his leadership style, Professor M.S. Rao a self-proclaimed “leadership Guru” referred to his leadership style as being “soft leadership” a new direction to leadership he coined. In his article Mahatma Gandhi – Soft Leadership he defines “soft leadership” as “the process of setting goals; influencing people through persuasion; building strong teams; negotiating them with a win-win attitude; respecting their failures; hand-holding them; motivating them constantly; aligning their energies and efforts; recognizing and appreciating their contribution in accomplishing the organizational objectives with an emphasis on soft skills. It is based on the right mindset, skill set, and tool-set.” (Rao, P.) Looking back at Gandhi’s qualities as a man I feel this “soft leadership” style the professor has come up with is a great embodiment of all the things that made Gandhi a successful leader wrapped up with a nice bow and presented in a way that can be applied to the management of a business as opposed to a country.

Looking at the impacts of Gandhi’s leadership style we see an entire country freed from British colonial rule, and the prevention of a bloody civil war which would have seen India permanently divided with fighting between Muslims and Hindus likely continuing to this day. As a direct result of Gandhi’s transformative leadership however, the British Empire was forced to leave India with no war having been fought, and while blood may have been shed on each side, the amount was far less than what it could have been had Gandhi used violent protests as opposed to his non-violent non-cooperation. Gandhi did what had never been done before, he forced out a nation larger and more powerful than his own using non-violent methods setting a future precedent for all those leaders to follow him to use as a guide. Even when the British left behind a brewing civil war which had the potential to not only cause mass bloodshed and death, but also allow Britain the opportunity to re-enter India following the bloody war and re-gain control undoing all that Gandhi had worked for so many years to achieve. His impact on those who followed him were such that anywhere he went following the start of the riots and unrest peace followed, and through non-violent means he was able to slowly quell the fighting preventing a civil war, and despite losing his life in the process his teachings remain to this day followed by a great many. Leaders like our president Barrack Obama follow his teachings in leadership to this day.

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