A Valediction Forbidding Mourning

Main Themes In A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning Poem

June 7, 2021 by Essay Writer

A Valediction: forbidding Mourning

“A Valediction: forbidding Mourning” is recognised as one of Donne’s most famous yet simplest poems. It is his most direct statement of his ideal of spiritual love. Unlike, “The Flea,” in “A Valediction: forbidding Mourning” Donne professes a devotion to spiritual love that transcends merely the physical. In this poem, the persona anticipates a physical separation from his beloved; he invokes the nature of that spiritual love to ward off the “tear-floods” and “sigh-tempests” that might otherwise attend on their farewell. The poem is quintessentially a sequence of metaphors and comparisons, each describing ways of looking at their separation which will help them avoid the mourning forbidden by the poem’s title.

Firstly, the persona explains that their farewell should be as mild as the uncomplaining deaths of virtuous men, for to weep would be “profanation of our joys.” Next, the persona compares harmful “Moving of th’ earth” to innocent “trepidation of the spheres,” equating the first with “dull sublunary lovers’ love” and the second with their love, “Inter-assured of the mind.” Like the rumbling earth, the dull sublunary lovers are all physical, unable to experience separation without losing the sensation that comprises and sustains their love. But the spiritual lovers “Care less, eyes, lips, and hands to miss,” because, like the trepidation (vibration) of the spheres (the globes that surrounded the earth in ancient astronomy), their love is not wholly physical. Also, like the trepidation of the spheres, their separation will not have the harmful consequences of an earthquake.

Though he must go, their souls are still one, and, therefore, they are not enduring a breach, If their souls are separate, he says, they are like the feet of a compass: His lover’s soul is the fixed foot in the center, and his is the foot that moves around it. The firmness of the center foot makes the circle that the outer foot draws perfect: “Thy firmness makes my circle just, And makes me end, where I begun.”

The persona then declares that, since the lovers’ two souls are one, his departure will simply expand the area of their unified soul, rather than cause a rift between them. Here Donne beautifully compares this to the same way that gold can be stretched by beating it “to aery thinness”. As Donne continues, he says that their souls are “two” instead of “one”, they are as the feet of a drafter’s compass, connected, with the center foot fixing the orbit of the outer foot and helping it to describe a perfect circle. This metaphor of the compass shows that persona’s love cannot be “perfect” without his partner, which shows the utmost adoration for his lover. The compass is also one of Donne’s most famous metaphors. It is the perfect image to summarise the values of Donne’s spiritual love, which are balanced, symmetrical, intellectual and beautiful in its sophisticated simplicity.

Similar to “The Sun Rising”, “A Valediction: forbidding Mourning” creates a dichotomy between the common love of the everyday world and the uncommon love of the persona. At this juncture, the persona claims that to tell “the laity,” or the common people, of his love would be to profane its sacred nature, and he is clearly condescending of the dull sublunary love of other lovers. The purpose of this dichotomy is to create a form of emotional aristocracy. This emotional aristocracy that Donne creates shows superiority of their love and how his travels will not affect it at all.

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An Analysis of John Donne’s Poem A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning

June 7, 2021 by Essay Writer

The parting of two lovers

In the poem A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning by John Donne the speaker of the poem is talking to his lover to tell her that although he is leaving their love will not be effected. It surprised me when I read the poem because I thought from the title that somebody died and this poem is to make him feel better. However the speaker describes the love between him and his lover, and there still something bad is happening to mourn and that is his departure and their separation. Thus the poetic line, the meter and the sound are all connected to the idea of parting and making the lover fell better about it.

The poem consists of short lines and that makes it flow smoothly with a rhyme at the ending. Also the shortness of the line makes the simple words that was used to stand out and be emphasized more to give the idea desired by the speaker, such as pass, souls, sad and go in the first stanza.

There is a sad tone in the poem that describes souls passing away, and tears being shed for a couple that were so much in love. Their love could not be measured because it was not only simple love with hands, lips and eyes only; these couple will miss more than these body elements because their love was based on a more complex things. The separation between the two would be a big loss for both and might get them emotionally disturbed.

However the flow of the poem and the use of simple words make this sadness less serious, and the emotions less troubled by the separation. Also to make the reader feel better about the fact that one of the two lovers is leaving. The length of the lines seems to draw the reader and make him interested of whats to come of the parting of this couple.

I did notice that the poem consists of stanzas, and each one of four lines. Also that every other line is indented to keep the poem not only balanced, easy to read and stay connected, but also to show that each line is going away from the other just like the lovers of the poem.

. The first word of each line is capitalized and starts with a connecting word, for these words keep the ideas tight and draw the readers attention and emphasize the first word of each line to make the next idea seem as important as the one before.

The importance of the points is also shown in the enjambment used in each stanza. The sentences in each stanza start with an idea that I thought was finished in the line before and I want to start a new idea in the next line but when I get to the next line I see that the idea still connected to one before it.

The enjambment makes the poem harder to read, and it shows the complexity of the thought, which is shown in the idea that the speaker is mentioning because it is hard for him to think of leaving and leave his lover behind. That makes him uncomfortable, and the same thing the poem is doing to the reader, it makes him uncomfortable with whats going on but as he goes on every thing clears.

The thing I liked about this poem is that in the stanzas that narrator uses metaphors of the gold and the compass illustrating that although the lovers are parting they still somehow connected with a strong connection. The gold is used to show that when it is beaten it doesnt separate, and the same with the compass, no matter how far its feet get away from each other they would still be connected.

The same idea is shown in the enjambment, which is a lot in the whole poem, to show that the couple are still connected even though they are parting for the while being. Thus I think that this enjambment mirrors the thought of the speaker, and it gets the reader to read more by changing the pace of the poem to make it flow more so that one would know more of the idea he is talking about.

The meter of the poem is another thing that helps it flow too. Since it is a tetra-meter Trochaic Foot, it goes with a quick, fast pace so his soul mate forgets that he is going away and to understand faster that even if he goes away they still connected and their love would last. Also the Trochaic foot has a less serious tone, which was intended by the speaker to make the idea of his departure sounds less troubling to his lover.

There are some exceptions to the tetra-meter in the poem in certain lines where it was missing one syllable especially in the beginning when he narrator said As virtuous men pass mildly away, / And Whisper to their souls to go, (1-2) he was talking about some people leaving and I understood as a bad tone like dieing, and the missing syllapul symbolizes that somebody is leaving.

Finally I noticed that there is no Alliteration in this poem. The speaker didnt repeat any sounds in his poem to prove my point that he wanted his soul mate forget about the sadness and not to mourn their parting.

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A Literary Analysis of a Valediction: Forbidding Mourning by John Donne

June 7, 2021 by Essay Writer

The Perfect Love

On any given day at the airport, couples in love can be seen saying goodbye to one another. Everyday, thousands of people are forced to say goodbye to a loved one for a period of time for one reason or another. People react to this period of separation in a number of ways. Some cry, some smile, and some do nothing. In John Donnes poem, “A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning”, the concept of love and separation is addressed. In this poem, Donne is able to use metaphors in order to help show how a perfect love says goodbye.

Surprisingly, this poem, which is a love poem, opens with the idea of the death of virtuous men who “pass mildly away”. Virtuous men quietly make the transition from this world to the next. Because their friends left on earth know that the deceased lived a virtuous life, there is some sadness, but the friends know that the dead are now in a better place. The death, although sad, was also very peaceful. Donne equates this scene with the farewell of lovers. He believes that like death, parting is a sorrowful time, but is should be peaceful. There should not be a big emotional scene; rather, there should be a calm exchange of emotion.

This idea of a peaceful goodbye is further seen in the second stanza in another metaphor. In this stanza, Donne transitions from talking about death to a man talking to his loved one. The man is telling his loved one that their parting must “make no noise,/ No tear-floods, nor sigh-tempests move”. Donne uses the metaphor of storms to describe the flood of emotions that usually bring crying and tears from two lovers. This metaphor is used to say what a goodbye should not be like. Reiterating the fact that it should be peaceful and calm, not like a storm.

In the third stanza, another metaphor is seen that helps show how to say goodbye. It involves the movement of the earth and celestial bodies. The first two lines of the stanza discuss how man fears earthquakes. Earthquakes cause the whole earth to shake. This is a strange phenomenon, which does not occur that often and, as a result, bring fear to mankind. This represents the type of goodbye that is very emotional and noticeable, the opposite of what Donne wants. Instead, good-byes should be like the movement of planets. For example, “the trepidation of the spheres,/ Though greater far, is innocent.” These two lines state that the movement of celestial bodies is far greater than the trembling of the earth. However, while this is a much greater motion. It remains unnoticed and innocent. Through this metaphor, Donne is saying that the greater love does not have to mean that there should be a big emotional scene. Instead, the goodbye in a relationship of true love should be quiet and not too noticeable.

The next metaphor found compares the couple in loves love and separation to that of gold. According to the poem, their love has been refined into something that is not definable. Their love is not based only on the physical, but the spiritual as well.. They can be separated and their love can continue to remain strong. The metaphor of the gold demonstrates this fact as well. By separating for the time being, their love is not experiencing a “breach, but an expansion,/ like gold to airy thinness beat.” Their love is malleable, just like gold. No matter how many times gold is hit, it gets longer and thinner, but does not break. This is what true love should be like. Separation should not cause the love to cease, but should remain intact.

In the seventh stanza, another important metaphor about separation is introduced, comparing true love to a compass. A compass is used to draw circles and has two endpoints, connected at a peak in the center. One point then encircles the other, forming a circle. In this poem, Donne refers to the loved one being left behind as “the fixed foot,[which] makes no show/ To move, but doth, if thother do.” The other point “leans, and hearkens after” the center point. The center point helps keep the other to the true shape of a circle. Their love is like this compass, with the lady being left behind as the center. The man is leaving, but his love revolves around and leans upon his love. Although they are separated on the physical level, they are still connected spiritually by the bridge of love, which is the piece in the center of the compass connecting the two points. Unlike the other metaphors, the compass is personified in this poem. It is given human characteristics like roam, leans, and hearkens. This allows for characteristics of the compass to relate to human characteristics and human love. By using personification, Donne is able to help his reader relate to this inanimate object in this metaphor.

As a result of the compass, the last metaphor referring to the separation of lovers is found. The compass forms a perfect circle, which is like the lovers love: perfect. The shape of a circle is viewed as a perfect shape by many cultures. Coincidentally, the compass, representing the lovers, forms a perfect circle, showing the perfect love, which the lovers form. The idea of a circle is also symbolic of the lovers return to each other. The man is leaving, but, like the points on a circle, he will return to where he started, where his love remains. A circle always starts and ends at the same point.

Donnes use of metaphors in his poetry greatly enhances the meaning and allows for greater understanding of his poetry. His use of metaphors in this poem is important in the overall meaning of the poem and allows the reader to visualize this intangible concept of love and good-byes. Metaphors are an effective aid for helping people understand what he is trying to say. Without them, his poetry would suffer and become stale and boring. However, by using metaphors, his poetry remains interesting and stimulating.

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Analysis Of A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning Poem

June 7, 2021 by Essay Writer

Magnolia Village

Donna dreamed how she would come home lay down on her couch; watch the Super Bowl game 37; or watch her favorite DVD A Walk to Remember and eat caramel popcorn that she did not have to share. She woke up to the sound of her mothers voice These dishes are stuck together in red sauce, the counters have enough crumbs to donate the Salvation Army. It is Saturday morning get up out of bed and clean up this filthy room and the kitchen. Reality set in and Donna realized she was far away from her home in the sky; at least thats what it felt like. Donna got up as her mother instructed to clean the kitchen and her room, which was split into three parts that allowed room for clothes to be in the corners, under her sleigh bed in her bathroom and also in the closet to the brim. She brought her CD player with her to listen to her favorite song by Yolanda Adams I believe I can fly. It was a way of escape to any place but here.

Donna majored in History at Galenway University through a work-study grant she received from financial aid. She enjoys reading and learning about the past. She also had a minor in Political Science, but unsure of the career she wanted to pursue local diner on campus. The grant allowed her to work at Galens, a local campus diner for students, as a waitress. She worked in the evenings and took her classes in the mornings. The job helps her to pay for tuition and books, and give her extra money for the weekend. It also allowed her to keep her savings of $2500, which she earned babysitting a few nights a week for the women in her church.

She walks in the diner around 5:00pm and heads for the locker room to change in to her white and blue, the school colors of course, uniform with ruffles on the bottom. She types her ID number into the computer, and begins wiping tables and taking orders. After the students leave from eating and talking about their latest grade on the quiz and the football game on Friday, she walks over to clean up and notices the Galen gazette, a student newspaper, left on the table. It has articles about campus meeting, the sports editorials for many different sports in the fall season, an also apartment listings. She sat down since its close to her break and looks at the paper. She looks for apartments that are between $200-$300, which is dirt-cheap for students. Magnolia Village, located about three miles from the campus, has an ad the size of my hand stating if you want convience and luxury with style then come to Magnolia Village. It sounds great she thought. She decided to go after work.

She arrivs at the apartments and is amazed by the beauty and form of the complex. They have three storied buildings with the top shaped like a cathedral, the bricks were sided with vibrant red brick siding, and each aparment section was yellow, blue, green, and tan. It also has an exercise room, car wash, and a pool with a slide and club house for parties and gatherings. She decided to go in the leasing office and get an application. She went asked for an application and a woman by the name of Lisa helped with the application and said, Ill would be glad to show you the apartment and your name is? Donna said, Donna and I go to Galenway University as a freshman year. Im looking for an apartment I can stay in on my own and pay for myself. Lisa said, You have come to the right place. We were built with the University in mind. Come with me in the go cart and Ill show you the model. She rode along as Lisa drove the cart, like a maniac on a mission, swiveling in and out of curves and lanes. She parks and the first idea that comes to her is Im alive! Im alive! as if it could have been her last day on earth.

They went inside the model and Donna could not believe her eyes. There is plush berber carpeting in the living room and dining room with a chandelier. The patio has a white picket fence. There are brand-new appliances such as a microwave, stove, dishwasher, and refrigerator that was all produced by GE. The kitchen also has lots of counter space with a long bar. The Master is gigantic with the bathroom on the inside, which has a Jacuzzi and balled light bulbs above the mirror. There is walk in closets with iron shelves and unbelievable space. The windows are tall and elegant with white blinds. The linen closet has shelves down to the floor. There is also a utility room with space large enough for a washer and dryer. Lisa said The apartment is only two hundred a month a total electric. That is enough for Donna she is in love with Magnolia Village and started the application process. Lisa said Donna it will take twenty-four hours to see if you are approved. Since you have no credit, a student, and no criminal record you will be highly approved. The deposit $100.00 and the application is free. Donna completed the application within seconds, and gave lisa the money for the deposit and took her card to call her the next day.

After leaving the apartment complex, she drove home to tell her mother who had second thoughts about her daughter moving on her own. She has not lived on her own before. Ser said it may not be a good idea for you to move just yet. Give yourself more time to get used to going to school and paying a bill before you take on more than you can handle. Donna felt hurt because she thought her mother would be happy, but instead she is explaining the other side of living independently. She went in her room, laid on her bed, and grabbed her a favorite teddy bear, Mr Snapple, she had received when she was a child ,as her eyes filled with tears of discouragement. She thought of how unfair her mother was, and that if the apartment was approved she would leave immediately

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Donne’s a Valediction: Forbidding Mourning. Poem Analysis

May 6, 2021 by Essay Writer

A Valediction: forbidding Mourning

“A Valediction: forbidding Mourning” is recognised as one of Donne’s most famous yet simplest poems. It is his most direct statement of his ideal of spiritual love. Unlike, “The Flea,” in “A Valediction: forbidding Mourning” Donne professes a devotion to spiritual love that transcends merely the physical. In this poem, the persona anticipates a physical separation from his beloved; he invokes the nature of that spiritual love to ward off the “tear-floods” and “sigh-tempests” that might otherwise attend on their farewell. The poem is quintessentially a sequence of metaphors and comparisons, each describing ways of looking at their separation which will help them avoid the mourning forbidden by the poem’s title.

Firstly, the persona explains that their farewell should be as mild as the uncomplaining deaths of virtuous men, for to weep would be “profanation of our joys.” Next, the persona compares harmful “Moving of th’ earth” to innocent “trepidation of the spheres,” equating the first with “dull sublunary lovers’ love” and the second with their love, “Inter-assured of the mind.” Like the rumbling earth, the dull sublunary lovers are all physical, unable to experience separation without losing the sensation that comprises and sustains their love. But the spiritual lovers “Care less, eyes, lips, and hands to miss,” because, like the trepidation (vibration) of the spheres (the globes that surrounded the earth in ancient astronomy), their love is not wholly physical. Also, like the trepidation of the spheres, their separation will not have the harmful consequences of an earthquake.

Though he must go, their souls are still one, and, therefore, they are not enduring a breach, If their souls are separate, he says, they are like the feet of a compass: His lover’s soul is the fixed foot in the center, and his is the foot that moves around it. The firmness of the center foot makes the circle that the outer foot draws perfect: “Thy firmness makes my circle just, And makes me end, where I begun.”

The persona then declares that, since the lovers’ two souls are one, his departure will simply expand the area of their unified soul, rather than cause a rift between them. Here Donne beautifully compares this to the same way that gold can be stretched by beating it “to aery thinness”. As Donne continues, he says that their souls are “two” instead of “one”, they are as the feet of a drafter’s compass, connected, with the center foot fixing the orbit of the outer foot and helping it to describe a perfect circle. This metaphor of the compass shows that persona’s love cannot be “perfect” without his partner, which shows the utmost adoration for his lover. The compass is also one of Donne’s most famous metaphors. It is the perfect image to summarise the values of Donne’s spiritual love, which are balanced, symmetrical, intellectual and beautiful in its sophisticated simplicity.

Similar to “The Sun Rising”, “A Valediction: forbidding Mourning” creates a dichotomy between the common love of the everyday world and the uncommon love of the persona. At this juncture, the persona claims that to tell “the laity,” or the common people, of his love would be to profane its sacred nature, and he is clearly condescending of the dull sublunary love of other lovers. The purpose of this dichotomy is to create a form of emotional aristocracy. This emotional aristocracy that Donne creates shows superiority of their love and how his travels will not affect it at all.

Read more

John Donne’s Poetry Style and Characteristics

May 6, 2021 by Essay Writer

John Donne’s poetry is characterized by complex imagery and irregularity. In his four pieces of poetry, Song, A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning, Meditation 17, and Death Be Not Proud, Donne effortlessly displays the traits of a metaphysical poet. He uses a variety of arguments in all of his work. He also incorporates many significant comparisons in his poems. Finally, Donne includes a fine use of language in all of his poetry. Overall, John Donne enlists all of the conventions of a metaphysical poet in his prose, meditation and poems.

John Donne uses a great variety of arguments in all of his work. In “Death Be Not Proud,” Donne expresses his view that death is not something feared, as it often is, and has been, since the beginning of time. He points out the weaknesses of death and, with confidence, declares his victory over it by means of his lack of respect and fear for its implications. The basis of his argument is to show the weakness of death in his poem. For instance:

…Death be not proud, though some have called thee

Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so;

For those whom thou think’st thou dost overthrow

Die not, poor Death, not yet canst thou kill me…

(Donne, “Death Be Not Proud” 1-4)

He goes on to describe death as a mere transition, which does not serve as an end, but instead, a new awakening to an eternal afterlife.

Throughout Donne’s poetry, he incorporates many significant comparisons. In A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning, Donne expresses his feelings about his wife with a great use of comparisons. The metaphors of earthquakes in line 9, and celestial spheres, line 11, portray a great understanding of his relationship with specific details about the magnitude of love. Donne uses these to explain how two different, and gigantic events can either bring “harms and fears”, or “innocence”. The contrast between the magnitude of earthquakes and celestial trepidation is compared to the love between two bodies and two soles. While the early language of the poem relates lover’s souls as one, the possibility of separate bodies, yet a single mixed soul is described:

If they be two, they are two so

As stiff twin compasses are two;

Thy soul, the fixed root, makes no show

To move, but doth, if th’ other do.

And though it in the center sit,

Yet when other far doth roam,

It leans and hearkens after it,

And grows erect, as that comes home.

(Donne, “A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning” 25-32)

The conclusion of the poem is that the soul, or “fixed root” can never be separated like the bodies. While the lover’s bodies are separated by great distance, they will be like the compass in that the points are wide, but the handle joins them. Here, Donne also argues that the lovers’ bodies are physically separated, but the two are joined by the soul, or “fixed root”.

Finally, Donne includes a superior use of language in his work. Figurative language is a very important poetic device in “Death Be Not Proud”. Throughout this poem, there is a strong use of assonance- the repetition of vowel sounds within a phrase. The sound of the words help in structuring Donne’s writing. Nearly every line contains a repetition of “o” sounds. In the following line, an example of this device is clear:

“Die not poor death, not yet canst thou kill me” (Donne, “Death Be Not Proud” 4)

The frequent use of assonance does not directly develop the poems theme, but it does help to convey the theme more vividly by making the lines flow. The good use of language in this poem makes the central idea of the entire poem easy to understand.

Overall, John Donne enlists all of the conventions of a metaphysical poet in his prose, meditation and poems. He does an excellent job of including arguments and comparisons in his work. He also applies figurative language to his work, which makes for easier reading and understanding. Donne, writing in a conversational style, emphasizing complex meanings, and including unusual imagery includes all of the standards of a metaphysical poet in his works of prose, meditation and poems.

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John Donne’s to His Coy Mistress and Valediction: Forbidding Mourning. Poem Comparison

May 6, 2021 by Essay Writer

Though “To His Coy Mistress” by Andrew Marvell and “A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning” by John Donne are metaphysical poems emphasizing love, the narrators use very different approaches and have opposing perspectives on what love truly is. In “To His Coy Mistress” the author is speaking of a mistress that he is trying to coax into sleeping with him. He urges her to abandon her false modesty and lay with him before they both die. He mocks her with a condescending tone when he says “then Worms shall try That long preserv’d Virginity: And your quaint Honour turn to dust:” (“To His Coy Mistress”) However, in other parts of the poem he has a very different approach. He says that ” HAD we but World enough, and Time,” he would shower her with the love and adoration she is deserving of before bedding her. However, because they can’t stop time, they need to seize the moment and enjoy life while they can.

This is very different from the lover in “A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning.” In this poem, the author is speaking to his wife, not a mistress. He is discouraging her from openly mourning an approaching time that they will be apart. (John Donne: Poems Summary and Analysis of “A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning) He will be traveling overseas, and he is trying to comfort her with the reassurance of his love in this poem. He tells his wife that earthquakes may bring harm and fear to some, but these fears should not affect his beloved because of the firm nature of their love. (John Donne: Poems Summary and Analysis of “A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning) He goes on to say that their love is far more superior than most because it is so much more than physical. Their love transcends even their understanding. It is a spiritual love that cannot be reduced by something as simple as distance. This concept is opposite of the love described in “To His Coy Mistress.”

Like the other poems, “Death Be Not Proud” written by John Donne is also a metaphysical poem from the 1600’s. However, it has a far different theme. Instead of love, this poem is written directly to “Death,” as if death is a person he can speak to directly. John Donne was a very spiritual man, which is reflective of both “Death be Not Proud” and “A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning.” In “Death Be Not Proud,” he is mocking death and telling it that “though some have called thee Mighty and dreadful, thou art not so;” He goes on to say that death cannot kill him. He even alludes to the idea of it being a pleasurable experience, a temporary “rest for our bones” and “our soul’s delivery.” (Death Be Not Proud) He calls death a pitiful slave to “fate, chance, kings, and desperate men.” In other words, it doesn’t get to choose who it kills. (Understanding Donne’s Death Be Not Proud) After a short sleep, we will wake up to eternal life and death will ultimately be the one slain. This is very different from the conventional views on death. We usually associate death with sadness. However, Donne turns this notion on its head.

As with most authors, both John Donne and Andrew Marvell’s personal lives were reflective of their work. John Donne was a scholarly man who attended both Oxford and Cambridge but couldn’t graduate at the time because he was a Catholic and only Protestants were allowed diplomas. (Understanding Donne’s Death Be Not Proud) Unfortunately, he also suffered from sickness. He had tuberculosis or “consumption” as it was referred to in the 1600’s. This plagued him throughout his life and is probably one reason many of his poems deal with themes like death and transcending physical constraints. He seems to be looking toward higher ideals such the spiritual love he feels for his wife in “A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning,” and his disdain and ultimate defeat of death in “Death Be Not Proud.”

Andrew Marvell, on the other hand, was a seated politician in the House of Commons. He had strong political views which are reflective in much of his work. (“To His Coy Mistress” by Andrew Marvell Analysis) He was never married and seeing that he was a politician well before the era of video cameras and cell phones, this poem could have been written about one of his conquests. This is purely conjecture. However, based on what we know about our modern-day politicians, it is an easy assumption!

All three of these poems reflect the Early Modern idea of introspection but have different themes and ways of going about that meditation. In both “A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning” and “Death Be Not Proud,” John Donne is reflecting on his personal feelings toward love and death. However, in “To His Coy Mistress,” Andrew Marvell is reflecting on his primal feeling of lust which he tries to cloak in words of romantic love to his lady in waiting. He’s doing everything possible to get his “mistress” to come to bed with him. He’s also reflecting on time within the poem. He knows his time is fleeting and he wants to enjoy every minute he can.

In conclusion, these three poems differ in a multitude of ways but are all classic examples of the Early Modern period. They are written about the essential parts of human life both love and death and are reflective of how we grapple with these ideas. When I turned in my first discussion response, I said that I love to read and I still do. However, I am sincerely hoping for some Faulker, Fitzgerald, or Hemingway soon! My eyes are delirious with allegories and thou art these! I hope this made you smile. This class is no joke, but I’m hanging in there!

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Assessment of a Valediction Forbidding Mourning Poem: Adrienne Rich Vs. John Donne

May 6, 2021 by Essay Writer

The primary aim of this paper is to provide a comparison between Adrienne Rich’s Poem titled, “A Valediction Forbidding Mourning”, and that of John Donne with the same title. The two poets employ a sophisticated poetic language in their quest to express the feeling about the circumstances that the speakers of their poems find themselves in. The two authors tend to emphasize on the life of women in the society. The two poets try to give insight to the societies of the world and assert that the society ought to show love to women if their pain, as depicted in the two poems, is to be averted.

“A Valediction Forbidding Mourning”, poem by John Donne mainly expresses the feelings of love that Donne has towards his wife (Donne 5). The poem was first published in early 1633 which are exactly two years after the death of John Donne. The poem was first published in the poetry collection part known as Songs and Sonnets. Despite this, John Donne wrote the poem in early 1611 especially to his wife to comfort her while Donne was in France on government business activities. At this time, his wife was back at home in Mitcham in England. According to the title of the poem it is clear that Donne tries to depict and educate the society that when a wife and husband separate and part they should not mourn but only bid each other farewell (Donne 15). The poem involves various emotional feelings of love especially to wife and husband who lack physical closeness. However, Donne depicts and illustrates in the poem that he and his wife have spiritual and physical dimension of love, and they can feel apart even if they are not together in the same region. Their souls are spiritually together, and they will join together physically when he returns back to England from France (Donne 12).

“A Valediction Forbidding Mourning,” poem by John Donne is the metaphysical poem that involves a number of characters including spiritual, transcendent, as well as concrete and abstract objects. In the poem, John Donne compares the love he shares with his wife to a compass, and he involves a lot of mockeries as well as sentimental romantic tone. The poem includes a lot of exaggerations that is based on literary perfect use of hyperbole. The poem also involves a logical argument where Donne argues and asserts that he and his wife will remain together spiritually even if they are physically apart. There are expressions of various feelings that express personal as well private feelings that indicate the valediction that Donne tries to depict in the poem (Donne 22).

From the analysis of the poem, there are various figures of speech as well as literary figurative language that are applied in order to make the poem more interesting. For example, Donne involves extensive use of metaphor in order to convey his love message. In stanza one he compares his separation from his wife to the separation of a human soul from his body when he dies. The body represents the physical love while the soul symbolizes the spiritual love that Donne and his wife enjoy when they are not together (Donne 18). The sixth stanza also indicates the use of paradox as well as simile style especially when Donne compares their souls to the expansion of beaten gold. Their poem also involves a number of alliteration such as in line three, “while some of the sad friends do say” (Donne 32).

The main theme of this poem is the love especially between a husband and a wife. The love described in this poem is both spiritual and physical, and the main factor keeping the lovers tighter according to this poem is spiritual and intellectual despite their physical separations. The poem also describes the theme of death and how good men in the society usually die without complaining.

The poem external structure is from stanza one to stanza nine and mainly depicts wife and husband relationships and love in the society (Donne 13). On the other hand, “A Valediction Forbidding Mourning”, poem by Adrienne Rich also depicts the female voice in the society (Rich 11). According to Adrienne Rich, women in the society, mainly writes about themes that touch their plight, and most of them do not indicate female experiences such as pain, anxiety, lesbianism among many other subjects. In stanza one, Rich depicts and illustrates how males fear reading female literary writings despite the valediction given to them by females. Rich also illustrates some of the painful experiences that female individuals undergo in the society. According to Rich men have are not reducing the pains they experienced in the modern society (Rich 8).

The poem also involves the use of various symbolism and metaphorical language. The poem also depicts both past and future experiences of individuals in the society including impending death that all human beings must undergo in the society. Rich depict how death experiences are painful and require a good farewell to look more comfortable. The poem also illustrates that life is full of challenges and troubles, and the human body will experience pain in cases of troubles in their life. The wish of dying is metaphorically indicated in the poem where the author says, “my bleeding is under control,” in stanza three. Rich argues that the death will end human sufferings in life (Rich 17).

According to Rich leaving a legacy of fearless expression about death and encourages women writers to face the future with bold steps without thinking about their past life (Rich 15). She argues that planting of red plant after death of people especially by men to women is a new symbol for the good future. Rich asserts further that a new feminist image is soon dominating the society (Rich 7).

Therefore, it is clear that the poem central theme is about death. The valediction forbidding mourning and the main aim of the author in the poem is to encourage women writers to start writing about their experiences in order to adequately express their feelings and past experiences.

Comparison of the Two Poems

Unlike John Donne Poem of nine stanzas, Adrienne Rich’s poem is having six stanzas with different number of lines. For example, the first stanza is having four lines, the second stanza one line while the fifth stanza has six lines (Rich 5). The poem also involves the use of various language structures such as the use of commas, semicolon, and colon as well as other language structures.

The use of different language structures such as comma and semicolon is also in the John Donne’s poem. Furthermore, both the two poems also involve the use of different figures of speech as similes, repletion, symbolism as well as metaphors and imagery.

The two poems also share and have the same title, “A Valediction Forbidding Mourning”. It is also clear that John Donne poem main theme is love while Adrienne poem mainly talks about women experiences in the society as well as the ability to move on after losing loved ones due to death experiences. Both the poems also depict and describe the theme of death and how people usually feeling very sad due to death experiences in the society. However, Rich main aim is to encourage women writers to write about their experiences in the society while John Donne majorly depicts how the soul and the human body depicts love experiences.

Adrienne Rich Poem was written in around 1970 while John Donne was written in early 1611. Since the two poems share the same title, it is clear that Rich loved and had a lot of knowledge about John Donne’s poem. Furthermore, Rich used this title to challenge women to avoid male dominance in the society by encouraging female writers to dominate the literary writing industry. This will promote gender development in terms of literature in the society.

The use of punctuation in both the poems is also similar, and this indicates that the two poems do not only share titles but also share internal structures. The poems also aim at encouraging individuals in the society that their feelings are crucial, and they should express them without fear in order to promote their happiness and joy in the society.

It also clear that Donne poem indicates deep love relationship with intense closeness and pleasure while the love relationship discussed by Rich is full of bitterness and pain. Donne poem also describes how long distance relationship may be devastating to couples who lack firm trust and spiritual connection. This because according to Donne physical love cannot be stable in cases of difficulty and troubles while spiritual and intellectual love bond couples in all conditions and situations.

Both the poems also value the importance of farewell in all cases whether in death conditions. Furthermore, the title of these poems indicates some love feelings as well as sad feelings suggested by valediction and mourning experiences. Rich and Donne try to argue that where there is valediction; people should avoid mourning in the society. This is because valediction is closely associated with love feelings and farewell experiences.

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Evaluation of the Poems: Holy Sonnets Ix Vs. a Valediction Forbidding Mourning

May 6, 2021 by Essay Writer

TP-CASTT: Holy Sonnets IX

Title: I read the title as signifying that there would be some sort of religious questioning happening in the poem. I also assumed that this was one of a number of poems in this “Holy Sonnets” series, probably because the poet had a lifelong battle of faith in which he asked many questions to solidify his beliefs.

Paraphrase: If minerals which are evil, a tree which has done evil, goats which are sexually evil, and serpents who are always evil can roam the world without being punished, why should humans be? Why is it that my ability to think and reason makes my actions punishable? It is easy to have mercy, so why does God not practice it? Yet, I am just a lowly human and have no right to contest the will of God. I hope that my tears will allow you to be forgetful towards my sins so that your memory of me is not plagued with them. It would be merciful of you to forget my sins.

Connotation: The poet begins the poem with an assertively questioning air. He interrogates God as to how “poisonous minerals,” the Tree of Knowledge, “lecherous goats,” and envious serpents may all walk the Earth unpunished for their sins when humans consistently receive repercussions for their heinous acts. This causes the reader to ponder for themselves the same question, and to think of other examples of how unfair it might seem for God to only punish humans. The poem’s questioning air continues with more rhetorical questions to God. The poet uses the rhetorical device known as apostrophe to address God, even though he is not really there to answer those questions. This shows that the speaker has probably spent much time pondering these questions and has probably searched out responses from many well-known men of faith. I figure this because one does not simply go directly to God each time they have a question about something in their faith, they would first seek out the wisdom of lower leaders. The poet also acknowledges that he probably shouldn’t be questioning God as he is, “But who am I, that dare dispute with Thee?” The following line shows how the speaker has been reduced to pleading with God, as he describes that his tears shall form a Lethean flood. Lethe is a reference to a mythical river which caused total forgetfulness, and therefore the speaker hopes that his tears will cause God to forget his sins. The poem ends on a less inquisitive note, and more of a begging note as the speaker asks that God not taint his memory of the speaker with “sin’s black memory” but rather have mercy and forget his sins.

Attitude: The poem starts off in an inquisitive state as the speaker ponders the many idiosyncrasies he sees within his own faith. He is not condemning them, but rather seeks answer to his deep and though-provoking questions. The speaker gets more and more energetic with his words as he continues on into lines 4-6. After line 8, the speaker realizes he has overstepped his place as a human and turns to a more pleading attitude of asking forgiveness rather than demanding it. He has provided his points and now see that he may have been a bit too upfront about them as he got carried away in a fit of excited interrogation. The poem ends with an attitude of pleading as the speaker asks that the God reconsider his previous stance and be more forgiving of the sins of humans.

Shifts: The main shift in the poem occurs in line 9, “But who am I, that dare dispute with Thee?” In saying this, the speaker moves away from questioning God on his practice of holding rational creatures accountable for their actions while creatures that don’t think are not responsible for their sins to pleading that God overlook the sins of the rational beings as well.

Title: The title does, in fact, represent a religious debate between the speaker and his faith. I also assume that it was correct to think that it is one of a series of poems which all serve a similar purpose.

Theme: The theme of this poem is one of forgiveness. The speaker believes that Christ’s bllod was meant to wash away the sins of humans so that all may be forgotten when they are brought to the afterlife.

TP-CASTT: A Valediction Forbidding Mourning

Title: The title of this poem to me implies that it will be someone who is less than emotional and wishes that those around him would also stop being emotional and stop “mourning.” I also think that it will be a well-constructed piece because of the title “valediction.”

Paraphrase: Old men do die, even as some people wish they did not. We should not make a fuss when we must part ways. Our distance will not be the end of the world, as it has proven not to be before. People who love only skin deep cannot stand the distance because they don’t love anything but the presence of that person there. Our love is much deeper than that, so that it can be felt across the great distance. Our souls are still one, just with a space between. If we are not meant to be together, then the distance will show us so. We will feel the need for one another across our distance, and yearn for our reunification. I will, without a doubt, always come back.

Connotation: Donne begins with a metaphor in which he compares the departing of a loved one to the peaceful death of an old man. He effectively states that the depart should be so peaceful that it is like the death of an old man that is so peaceful that his old friends can’t even tell when he is gone. This is an excellent mood setter for the rest of the poem, and truly shows off donne’s romantic side. Donne then complements this metaphor with an extended analogy extending into the second stanza. He states that old men are to peaceful death as “our love is to easy parting.” He also compares their departure and sadness to the melting of snow, the “tear-floods,” and “sigh-tempests” which are all hyperboles along the same lines as the modern “cry me a river.” Donne continues with his metaphorical natural events in lines 9 and 10 when he compares their departure to the violence and disruption caused by an earthquake, saying that they should not cause that large of a disruption. Donne then opens up a large juxtaposition between the noticeable earthquakes and their temporary hysteria and the unnoticed celestial bodies and their profound impact on everything people do. In this metaphor, earthquakes are to shallow lovers as the celestial bodies are to Donne and his wife. People in these shallow relationships only love one another for the physical attractions, while Donne’s love is much deeper than that as they are connected by their minds. Donne uses synecdoche in line 20 as he states “eyes, lips, and hands to miss” as parts of the body represent the whole issue of people only loving based on attraction, turning a person into a sex-symbol rather than a life partner. Donne uses paradox by saying our “two souls” are “one” which causes the realization that they are truly bonded for life. Donne continues his metaphysical comparisons by comparing to his love to gold which can be stretched to a very thin level and still not break, unlike other metals, implying that his love with his wife will stretch farther distances than most and yet not break. Donne wraps up his poem with an extended metaphor of him and his wife both being parts of the same mathematical compass: his wife is the center and he is the part that goes round in circles about her, yet he always comes back.

Attitude: The speaker in this poem is quite sagacious and yet still loving. He is not the smoothest guy on the block, with his comparisons of love to old men dying, but it is evident that he is in love to last. The attitude of the poem remains relatively constant throughout, as he nitpicks the romance of others in favor of his deep, soul-bound connection with his wife.

Shifts: The only major shift in the poem is quite low-key, as Donne transitions from a professional lawyer type poet trying to win a case to end on a soft, tender note for his wife at the end of the poem.

Title: The title now means that the people should not mourn excessively over the leaving of their love, as if they are truly strongly in love then they will always be together in spirit.

Theme: One of the major themes of this poem is true love. Donne sees the infatuation of others as they mourn the leaving of their loves, and knows that they are not truly in love. He knows this because they only love one another when they are each present, signifying that they only love their flesh. Donne’s relationship is his ideal love, in which they have a spiritual connection that goes further than skin deep and can last across the distance they are separated by.

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Understanding the Concept of Love

May 6, 2021 by Essay Writer

The Perfect Love

On any given day at the airport, couples in love can be seen saying goodbye to one another. Everyday, thousands of people are forced to say goodbye to a loved one for a period of time for one reason or another. People react to this period of separation in a number of ways. Some cry, some smile, and some do nothing. In John Donne s poem, “A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning”, the concept of love and separation is addressed. In this poem, Donne is able to use metaphors in order to help show how a perfect love says goodbye.

Surprisingly, this poem, which is a love poem, opens with the idea of the death of virtuous men who “pass mildly away”. Virtuous men quietly make the transition from this world to the next. Because their friends left on earth know that the deceased lived a virtuous life, there is some sadness, but the friends know that the dead are now in a better place. The death, although sad, was also very peaceful. Donne equates this scene with the farewell of lovers. He believes that like death, parting is a sorrowful time, but is should be peaceful. There should not be a big emotional scene; rather, there should be a calm exchange of emotion.

This idea of a peaceful goodbye is further seen in the second stanza in another metaphor. In this stanza, Donne transitions from talking about death to a man talking to his loved one. The man is telling his loved one that their parting must “make no noise,/ No tear-floods, nor sigh-tempests move”. Donne uses the metaphor of storms to describe the flood of emotions that usually bring crying and tears from two lovers. This metaphor is used to say what a goodbye should not be like. Reiterating the fact that it should be peaceful and calm, not like a storm.

In the third stanza, another metaphor is seen that helps show how to say goodbye. It involves the movement of the earth and celestial bodies. The first two lines of the stanza discuss how man fears earthquakes. Earthquakes cause the whole earth to shake. This is a strange phenomenon, which does not occur that often and, as a result, bring fear to mankind. This represents the type of goodbye that is very emotional and noticeable, the opposite of what Donne wants. Instead, good-byes should be like the movement of planets. For example, “the trepidation of the spheres,/ Though greater far, is innocent.” These two lines state that the movement of celestial bodies is far greater than the trembling of the earth. However, while this is a much greater motion. It remains unnoticed and innocent. Through this metaphor, Donne is saying that the greater love does not have to mean that there should be a big emotional scene. Instead, the goodbye in a relationship of true love should be quiet and not too noticeable.

The next metaphor found compares the couple in love s love and separation to that of gold. According to the poem, their love has been refined into something that is not definable. Their love is not based only on the physical, but the spiritual as well.. They can be separated and their love can continue to remain strong. The metaphor of the gold demonstrates this fact as well. By separating for the time being, their love is not experiencing a “breach, but an expansion,/ like gold to airy thinness beat.” Their love is malleable, just like gold. No matter how many times gold is hit, it gets longer and thinner, but does not break. This is what true love should be like. Separation should not cause the love to cease, but should remain intact.

In the seventh stanza, another important metaphor about separation is introduced, comparing true love to a compass. A compass is used to draw circles and has two endpoints, connected at a peak in the center. One point then encircles the other, forming a circle. In this poem, Donne refers to the loved one being left behind as “the fixed foot,[which] makes no show/ To move, but doth, if th other do.” The other point “leans, and hearkens after” the center point. The center point helps keep the other to the true shape of a circle. Their love is like this compass, with the lady being left behind as the center. The man is leaving, but his love revolves around and leans upon his love. Although they are separated on the physical level, they are still connected spiritually by the bridge of love, which is the piece in the center of the compass connecting the two points. Unlike the other metaphors, the compass is personified in this poem. It is given human characteristics like roam, leans, and hearkens. This allows for characteristics of the compass to relate to human characteristics and human love. By using personification, Donne is able to help his reader relate to this inanimate object in this metaphor.

As a result of the compass, the last metaphor referring to the separation of lovers is found. The compass forms a perfect circle, which is like the lover s love: perfect. The shape of a circle is viewed as a perfect shape by many cultures. Coincidentally, the compass, representing the lovers, forms a perfect circle, showing the perfect love, which the lovers form. The idea of a circle is also symbolic of the lover s return to each other. The man is leaving, but, like the points on a circle, he will return to where he started, where his love remains. A circle always starts and ends at the same point.

Donne s use of metaphors in his poetry greatly enhances the meaning and allows for greater understanding of his poetry. His use of metaphors in this poem is important in the overall meaning of the poem and allows the reader to visualize this intangible concept of love and good-byes. Metaphors are an effective aid for helping people understand what he is trying to say. Without them, his poetry would suffer and become stale and boring. However, by using metaphors, his poetry remains interesting and stimulating.

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