How to Date a Browngirl Blackgirl Whitegirl Or Halfie

How to Date a Browngirl, Blackgirl, Whitegirl, Or Halfie by Junot Diaz: Depiction of Social and Socioeconomic Struggles of Minorities and Lower Income Communities

November 8, 2021 by Essay Writer

In “How to Date a Browngirl, Blackgirl, Whitegirl, or Halfie”, Junot Diaz creates a detailed dating guide for a teenage boy in America. Yunior walks us through this story detailing his methodical approach for what to do during a date depending on the type of girl. Each change he makes is construed as just the variance between the individual preferences of each girl or perhaps the actions of a typical teenager attempting to conceal things he finds embarrassing. Although this seems like the classic behavior of a teenager, his method of following distinct elements with certain details suggests a different motive. Through his attempts in disguising his actions, Yunior alludes to the more profound social and socioeconomic challenges faced by minorities and lower income communities that also challenge relationships. Ultimately, the subsequent changes he makes are geared towards maintaining the naïve view that out-of-towners still have about society and indicative of his longing for a life like theirs.

Like most teenagers, Yunior begins preparing for a secret date by convincing his mother to let him stay home while she goes to visit an aunt. Afterwards, he continues his plan by tidying up his family’s apartment; he mentions hiding several different things, but explicitly emphasizes how to handle the government cheese. He states, “Clear the government cheese from the refrigerator. If the girl is from the Terrace stack the boxes behind the milk. If she’s from the Park or Society Hill hide the cheese in the cabinet above the oven, way up where she’ll never see”. This introductory passage is extremely important because it asserts the significance of government cheese, as well as notable difference between the extent of hiding the cheese from certain girls. Unlike his family pictures or the basket in the bathroom, Yunior clearly defines in what manner he must hide the cheese if the girl coming over is from the Park or Society Hill, as opposed to one from the Terrace. By distinctly expressing how he must ensure the cheese is somewhere his dates would never see it, he begins to illustrate how disconnected these girls, or out-of-towners, are from the distinct reality of his situation.

Despite attending the same school, the separation between Yunior’s and the out-of-towner’s perceptions of society are further supported by his minimal effort to hide the cheese when a girl from the Terrace is going to his apartment. Although he is still slightly embarrassed, he knows girls from the Terrace have a more direct understanding of their environment, as well as a sense of empathy towards this matter and thus he isn’t concerned about being ridiculed. Seemingly, both Yunior and girls from his neighborhood understand how valuable the government cheese is to families in their community and how it shouldn’t be perceived as something shameful. However, when he is expecting an out-of-towner, Yunior exposes his discontent with the cheese due to its blemished connotation as a supplement for the impoverished and insinuates to his true desire for a better quality of life. Nevertheless, he still manages to punctuate how significant government cheese is when he concludes the story by saying: “Put the government cheese back in its place before your mom kills you”. Although he continues to disguise his latent motives with shallow statements, Yunior proves his legitimate understanding of the adverse nature of his circumstances. Despite his conflicting thoughts, his moral logic was ultimately successful in overcoming his lustful sentiments for a girl just to ensure the wellbeing of his family and acknowledging the significant value of the government cheese.

In addition to the economic inequality, Yunior also insinuates another fundamental difference in the family dynamics from both areas. Specifically, in their father figures. This isn’t just seen by how he mentions and describes the characteristics and values of each family from the different communities, but precisely by his lack of reference to one within his own life. Right from the start, you recognize this matter when he says: “Wait for your brother and your mother to leave the apartment”. Although it didn’t seem as important at the time, within this statement Yunior clearly defines the entirety of his immediate family. Otherwise, considering his possibly sensual expectations of the dates, if he was even slightly concerned about his own father arriving unexpectedly he would have surely taken at least some precaution. Furthermore, through the single comment he does make about his father, we can see the spiteful impression that Yunior’s family has of him. “Sip some of the Bermúdez your father left in the cabinet, which nobody touches”. This further strengthens the suspicion that his father abandoned his family, as well as to their degree of anger with him because although his family does in fact know that bottle is in the cabinet, they still refuse to touch it for any reason.

On the contrary, as soon as he begins talking about the out-of-town girls he distinctly mentions how their fathers would most likely be the ones to bring them. Yunior continually highlights his subliminal conception of these girls’ fathers and makes their significance to their family evident. Even more so, he glorifies their fathers by his specific dramatization of a phone call with one; “Call her house and when her father picks up ask if she’s there. He’ll ask, Who is this? Hang up. He sounds like a principal or a police chief, the sort of dude with a big neck, who never has to watch his back”. This is crucial in demonstrating his true emotions by showing his immediate panic after just a simple question and exemplifies how uncomfortable he is with speaking to one of their fathers. He purposely idealizes them by expressing his substantial assumptions based solely on the tone of their voice, especially when he compares one to a chief of police.

Unhappy with his life, Yunior shows us a glimpse of some things that these girls have, but are unfortunately inaccessible to him. Even with something as simple as cheese, he genuinely feels the immense social and socioeconomic divide. He shrugs off being called ‘malcriado’ by his mother, but perhaps he sees himself more in a literal translation of this word, which means ‘poorly raised’. He tries to exude masculinity, but his performance is perhaps just the tragic irony of his real life with an absent father. Yunior suppresses his deep desire for a better life, but it’s clear when you think of the bottle of rum in his cabinet which nobody touches and simultaneously refuses to discard. He knows these things are irreplaceable, but he won’t lose the optimism of attaining them someday.

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A Theme Of Identity In How To Date A Browngirl, Blackgirl, Whitegirl, Or Halfie

November 8, 2021 by Essay Writer

In the short story, How to Date a Browngirl, Blackgirl, Whitegirl, Halfie, there are many different forms of identity that can be taken from the story as a reader. This short story is about a boy who is about to go on a date with a girl. In these short few pages of the story, he describes a “dating handbook” about the girl he is about to go on a date with. With every ethnicity he is thinking that the girl is going to be, he has a separate set of standards he is expected to follow. He explains a different set of rules he has to follow if the girl is brown, black, white or half (mixed). Yunior, the boy who is in the main character in this short story, lives in New Jersey in a low-income home. We know this because he explains how he has to hide his “government cheese” when the girl comes over his house. This shows us how he has to hide his true self to impress the girl he is going to have over. Yunior is hiding his real identity because he is afraid to show who he really is and he does not want to seem like a loser to the girl he is going on a date with.

In the short story, Yunior talks about having a set of standards he has to follow in order to please the girl he is going on a date with. At the beginning of this story, he talks about where he is going to have to hide his government cheese in his house when she comes over. He explains how based off where she is from, that will depend on where he hides it. He explains that if a girl is a certain race, he should use certain etiquette on his date to please the girl. I feel as though he is trying to change who he really is to make a girl happy. He is doing things that he normally wouldn’t do to just to make the girl happy. He is changing his true self because he may be afraid of what the girl will think of him. For an example, he says “Clear the government cheese from the refrigerator.” If he was not scared to show who he really was, he would not have to worry about hiding it. I feel as though he should not care what she thinks of him and if she really loved him, she would not have his living situation bother her.

In the short story, I think the readers can think about Yunior’s identity from many different perspectives. The story definitely tells us a lot about how we perceive others in our everyday life. In our world today, especially this generation, we have many different stereotypes that we associate with different races and nationalities. We can even generalize stereotypes with different sexualities and age groups. These stereotypes, although not all at accurate, stick with people and when someone sees someone else that fits under a category, they tend to stereotype them to the things they hear about them or just think about. This story is a perfect example of how we perceive others. When Yunior was talking about his different actions he was going to take depending on the race of the girl, it shows how we all sometimes use stereotypes in our everyday lives to make decisions. Whether those decisions are big or small, they still play an important part in our life.

Another thing related to this short story is not only how we perceive others, but how we perceive ourselves. When Yunior talked about hiding his government cheese and the pictures of him with an afro, he has some sort of an insecurity about himself. We may perceive ourselves different than others think about us. Even though Yunior was embarrassed about where he lived and the things he had in his house, this made him completely change the type of person he was for a girl. If Yunior kept up the things in his house that made him feel uncomfortable to have around with a girl there, she could have not been weirded out or even have laughed at it. He might have thought that his house was not the way she wanted it to be, but he took those stereotypes he had about girls with different races and applied it to how she would think of him as a person. Every day, we may feel a certain way or feel insecure about ourselves. Other people around us may like us, no matter what our flaws are. Lastly, I feel like we should not act a certain way, especially towards certain races, just to please others, or even ourselves.

Lastly, I feel as though people should not care how others think about them. Yunior really took time to think about how he was going to plan on his night, just because he cared about how this girl perceived him. He also based his actions off of the race of a girl. I believe that no one should change who they are for someone or feel a different way about someone because of stereotypes put out there about them. Everyone should be the way they are and not change their identity for anyone, including Yunior.

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Topic Of Identity In How To Date A Browngirl, Blackgirl, Whitegirl, Halfie By Junot Diaz

November 8, 2021 by Essay Writer

In the short story, How to Date a Browngirl, Blackgirl, Whitegirl, Halfie, there are many different forms of identity that can be taken from the story as a reader. This short story is about a boy who is about to go on a date with a girl. In these short few pages of the story, he describes a “dating handbook” about the girl he is about to go on a date with. With every ethnicity he is thinking that the girl is going to be, he has a separate set of standards he is expected to follow. He explains a different set of rules he has to follow if the girl is brown, black, white or half (mixed). Yunior, the boy who is in the main character in this short story, lives in New Jersey in a low-income home. We know this because he explains how he has to hide his “government cheese” when the girl comes over his house. This shows us how he has to hide his true self to impress the girl he is going to have over. Yunior is hiding his real identity because he is afraid to show who he really is and he does not want to seem like a loser to the girl he is going on a date with.

In the short story, Yunior talks about having a set of standards he has to follow in order to please the girl he is going on a date with. At the beginning of this story, he talks about where he is going to have to hide his government cheese in his house when she comes over. He explains how based off where she is from, that will depend on where he hides it. He explains that if a girl is a certain race, he should use certain etiquette on his date to please the girl. I feel as though he is trying to change who he really is to make a girl happy. He is doing things that he normally wouldn’t do to just to make the girl happy. He is changing his true self because he may be afraid of what the girl will think of him. For an example, he says “Clear the government cheese from the refrigerator.” If he was not scared to show who he really was, he would not have to worry about hiding it. I feel as though he should not care what she thinks of him and if she really loved him, she would not have his living situation bother her.

In the short story, I think the readers can think about Yunior’s identity from many different perspectives. The story definitely tells us a lot about how we perceive others in our everyday life. In our world today, especially this generation, we have many different stereotypes that we associate with different races and nationalities. We can even generalize stereotypes with different sexualities and age groups. These stereotypes, although not all at accurate, stick with people and when someone sees someone else that fits under a category, they tend to stereotype them to the things they hear about them or just think about. This story is a perfect example of how we perceive others. When Yunior was talking about his different actions he was going to take depending on the race of the girl, it shows how we all sometimes use stereotypes in our everyday lives to make decisions. Whether those decisions are big or small, they still play an important part in our life.

Another thing related to this short story is not only how we perceive others, but how we perceive ourselves. When Yunior talked about hiding his government cheese and the pictures of him with an afro, he has some sort of an insecurity about himself. We may perceive ourselves different than others think about us. Even though Yunior was embarrassed about where he lived and the things he had in his house, this made him completely change the type of person he was for a girl. If Yunior kept up the things in his house that made him feel uncomfortable to have around with a girl there, she could have not been weirded out or even have laughed at it. He might have thought that his house was not the way she wanted it to be, but he took those stereotypes he had about girls with different races and applied it to how she would think of him as a person. Every day, we may feel a certain way or feel insecure about ourselves. Other people around us may like us, no matter what our flaws are. Lastly, I feel like we should not act a certain way, especially towards certain races, just to please others, or even ourselves.

Lastly, I feel as though people should not care how others think about them. Yunior really took time to think about how he was going to plan on his night, just because he cared about how this girl perceived him. He also based his actions off of the race of a girl. I believe that no one should change who they are for someone or feel a different way about someone because of stereotypes put out there about them. Everyone should be the way they are and not change their identity for anyone, including Yunior.

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The Significance Of Chapter Eight In How To Date A Browngirl, Blackgirl, Whitegirl, And Halfie By Junot Diaz

November 8, 2021 by Essay Writer

In Chapter Eight of Drown, “How to Date a Browngirl, Blackgirl, Whitegirl, and Halfie,” Yunior displays inconsistencies with his sexual orientation through his attempt to flirt with girls because earlier in the novel the narrative hinted that he is interested in men. In previous chapters, Junot Diaz portrays Yunior more feminine than his brother Rafa. This can be seen when Yunior refuses to tell his mother about his father’s affair because he wants to protect his mother, which portrays him as an emotional, compassionate, and caring person. Through Yunior’s narrative at the beginning of Chapter One, which describes his relationship with his brother, it is clear that Rafa is heterosexual and has a strong desire for girls. In contrast to how Rafa talks about girls all the time, Yunior is more emotional and not as outgoing with girls. Chapter Eight is significant to the story because Yunior’s changes in his point of view, voice/tone, and sexual orientation indicate his brother’s influence over him to be more masculine is not genuine to Yunior, and it confirms earlier hints about him being homosexual.

The change in point of view in this chapter indicates how unfamiliar Yunior is when it comes to flirting with the opposite sex. “Put down your hamburger and say, It must have been hard…Don’t ask, Let her speak on it and when you’re both finished eating walk back into the neighborhood. The skies will be magnificent, Pollutants have made Jersey sunsets one of the wonders of the world. Point it out. Touch her shoulder and say, That’s nice, right? Get serious. Watch TV but stay alert. Sip some of the Bermudez your father left in the cabinet, which nobody touches.” Unlike previous chapters, Yunior narratives the story in the second person. The use of “you’s” in the chapter shows how Yunior is trying to distance himself from what he is doing. It shows how he is disinterested in his conversation with girls. Every sentence he says is unnatural and seems forced. He talks like he is reading a list of instructions on how to get a girl. He likely learned how to flirt with girls by observing his brother. Yunior shows a strong desire to become friends with his brother earlier in the novel. From a young age, Yunior has learned from his brother that it is cool to get with many girls. Yunior tries to become more masculine by mimicking what Rafa is doing. In this chapter, Yunior does not act like his true self because he tries to be another version of Rafa. He tries to pretend that he knows everything about girls by listing out steps.

The change in voice/tone in this chapter indicates that he is nervous about inviting girls over to his house because everything he knows is based on his brother’s experience with girls. He makes sure to hide the government cheese, a type of cheese that is distributed to welfare beneficiaries. “Clear the government cheese from the refrigerator. If the girl’s from the Terrace stack the boxes behind the milk. If she’s from the Park or Society Hill hide the cheese in the cabinet above the oven, way up to where she’ll never see.” Through the ways he hides the government cheese, it is clear that Yunior is embarrassed by his economic status. The chapter further describes his action with, “Take down any embarrassing photos of your family in the campo, especially the one with half-naked kids dragging a goat on a rope leash…Hide the picture of yourself with an Afro. Make sure the bathroom is presentable. Put the basket with all the crapped-on toilet paper under the sink.” These actions depict him as someone sensitive to what other people think of him as a person. He does not want to be identified as a low-income individual because he is trying to fit in as a Dominican immigrant in a new country. He doesn’t want the girls to know that he is in poverty, which is a part of his identity. The denial of his economic status shows how he also does not want people to know that he is homosexual.

The sudden change in sexual orientation in this chapter indicates how urgent Yunior wants to change his identity. For the first time, Yunior shows interest in girls. Earlier in the novel, Yunior shows interest in Beto, Yunior’s childhood best friend who turned out to be homosexual and has an interest in Yunior. Yunior said his relationship with Beto is very important to him. His experience with Beto complicated his concept of sexuality. He is unable to talk about what happened between him and Beto to his mom, who still think they are having a pure friendship. He does not want to recognize what happened between him and Beto. The chapter starts with“Wait for your brother and your mother to leave the apartment,” which shows that he is going to do something he would not do regularly and does not want other people to find out. He tries to avoid humiliation from his brother on how unnatural Yunior is when trying to flirt with girls. Yunior tries to experiment with his sexuality to prove that he is not homosexual, yet his attempt to flirt with girls ends unsuccessfully. When he is finally alone, he says to himself, “Don’t fall asleep. It won’t help.” It represents how he realizes what he is trying to hide and finally decide to face his true identity instead of ignoring it. The chapter ends with, “Put the government cheese back in its place before your moms kill you.” The chapter both starts and ends with the mentioning of government cheese, which represents how nothing has changed about Yunor’s identity. He realizes that he cannot change his identity. Similar to how he is still in poverty, he is still homosexual. This chapter is significant because he reveals his true sexuality through changes in pint of view, voice/tone, and sexual orientation.

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Issues Of Heritage, Economic Class, And Race In How To Date A Browngirl, Blackgirl, Whitegirl, Or Halfie By Junot Diaz

November 8, 2021 by Essay Writer

Hierarchical systems exist in many places on this planet. One of the most prevalent hierarchical systems is the world happens to be on the island, Hispaniola. The hierarchy on the island places Haitians on the bottom due to their self-proclaimed African heritage, while Dominicans are placed higher up due to their opposition of taking a stand against the vast injustice happening on the other side of the Massacre River. Regardless of the common knowledge that ninety percent of Dominicans have African ancestry, the corrupt system still stands. In the story “How to Date a Browngirl, Blackgirl, Whitegirl, or Halfie” by Junot Diaz, Diaz writes about the complexities of race and how they affect Yunior, the main character’s, ability to use patriarchal views to cover his massive insecurities about his heritage, economic class, and race. These three factors alongside society prevent Yunior from allowing himself to get close to the young women in the story.

Heritage is a very big part of American society. Yunior talks about being Dominican and attempts to erase that part of himself specifically in this line “hide the pictures of yourself with an Afro take down any embarrassing photos of your family”. Yunior is masking his true identity and attempting to become palatable to society. He is abandoning his Dominican heritage and pretending to be someone he is not for the sake of being accepted. Yunior also analyses what he should expect in terms of the girl depending on her race or social class. For instance, he states, “a local girl may have hips and a thick ass but she won’t be quick about letting you touch”. By making these generalizations & he feeds directly into the culture that society is harming him.

Socioeconomic status also has a major part in Yunior’s life. He mentions that his family receives “government cheese”, which is a processed cheese provided to families who receive welfare. He attempts to hide that his family is poverty stricken, alongside giving a step by step guide on where to hide the cheese depending on where the girl lives. “Clear the government cheese from the refrigerator. If the girl’s from the Terrace, stack the boxes in the crisper. If she’s from the Park or Society Hill, then hide the cheese in the cabinet above the oven, where she’ll never see it”. This relates strongly to how African-American individuals tend to buy things like gold chains, Air Jordans, and various other luxuries to hide the fact that generational wealth does not exist in their community.

In conclusion, “How to Date a Browngirl” addresses the how one can use society to cover their insecurities from heritage to economic class. Yunior faces a never ending turmoil with his identity & uses a patriarchal view to take out his frustration on society.

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Racial Stereotypes in How to Date a Browngirl, Blackgirl, Whitegirl, Or Halfie by Junot Diaz

November 8, 2021 by Essay Writer

The short story “How to date a Browngirl, Blackgirl, Whitegirl, or Halfie” was written by Junot Diaz, a professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and is centered around a young teenage boy giving instructions about readiness for a date with a“Browngirl, Blackgirl, Whitegirl, or Halfie.” The narrator in the story addresses the reader with a casual “how to” language and teaches the reader how to date girls of different race. Junot Diaz intends for the story to be witty by mentioning the stereotypes of the three race and to make a confident, yet subtle statement about racism in America in “How to date a Browngirl, Blackgirl, Whitegirl, or Halfie.”

The main character of the story is assumed to be a young teenage male living in an urban area and trying to win over the heart of a whitegirl or halfie. However, because of his upbringing and culture, he knows he has to hide his identity in order to please a whitegirl or a halfie. It is seen in the story that the main character is from a lower class. He first hides the “government cheese”, which indicates that his family is on welfare. The girl’s social class will determine how well the cheese will have to be hidden. In the third paragraph, the author mentions the “Terrace” where the character lives. The “terrace” is represented as the part of city where the minority group live, especially because of social, legal, or economic pressure. We can also tell through the speech of the story that the main character is of a lower upbringing and social class by his jargon that he uses with his friends. “Are you still waiting on that bitch? Say, Hell yeah”; this type of speech takes credibility of what he is saying, because we know that he is not the brightest nor classiest of boys. The narrator then says “Call her house and when her father picks up ask if she’s there. He’ll ask, Who is this? Hang up. He sounds like a principal or a police chief” in the lower income neighborhoods, people come to disrespect authority or fear them. As the story advances, the narrator’s words and mannerisms change according to the different race of the girl.

These observations determine his verbal communication and physical approach to them. “Dinner will be tense. You are not good at talking to people you don’t know” shows the awkwardness between different peoples; in this case, it is between not only a boy and a girl, but a “Dominican” and a “halfie.” The narrator begins to mention the importance of “the Movement” to the girl, as well as her parents, by saying “It will sound like something her parents made her memorize”. “The Movement” is referring to the Civil Rights Movement, whose goal was to end racial segregation in the United States. The narrator then states “Your brother’s” response to that story: “Man, sounds like a whole lot of Uncle Tomming to me”, and the reference to Uncle Tom is implied to have been taken offensively by the girl when the narrator says “Don’t repeat this” in response to the “halfie’s” story. The implication that the “halfie” was upset by the comment is hinting at the sensitive subject of race and racial equality. As a matter of fact, “your brother” would say something like that also indicates an amount of racial insensitivity amongst Americans, which shows that people are starting to look at these topics as something for the history books. Instead, the narrator suggests to “say, It must have been hard”, because “she will appreciate your interest. She will tell you more”. The idea of racial inequality being something from a time long-passed is supported when the girl starts her story with “Back then”, showing that even she looks at it as old-news. The idea that racial stereotypes aren’t a modern problem anymore is blatantly shown to be untrue throughout the entire story with comments such as “the white ones are the ones you want” (403). Even the title implies the significant differences in ethnicities and the way that people look at each other. When the girl states that “Black people…treat me real bad”, the narrator again, is addressing the topic of racism as a very real problem for many Americans – something that stems from all peoples, and breeds only negative emotions. “That’s why I don’t like them” is an example of those feelings. These general statements such as “Black people” and “I don’t like them” group everyone of a single ethnicity into a single body, and shows one person’s feelings towards an entire people based on the actions of a few. Lastly, the narrator says “You’ll wonder how she feels about Dominican”. This is another example of the negative feelings that is seen when the subject of racism is raised. Diaz does not enclose his analysis solely to the ways in which the girl’s race and class should determine the behavior of her date. It also determines the girl’s behavior, or at least what the reader should expect of the girl. Diaz adds flavor to his instructions with advice as to what to expect. For example, Diaz’s short story mentions several comparisons between white girls, black girls, and hispanic girls. He sexually and physically compares the girls. He begins his statement with the sentence, “Get serious”. This is a satirical aspect to the piece because he is referring to the boy making “a move” on the girl. He mentions what a “local girl” may do in this situation compared to a “whitegirl”. This compares informs the reader how the speaker interprets these different cultures and what he believes each race would prefer or do in instances of sex. Diaz concludes that “A local girl may have hips and a thick ass but she won’t be quick about letting you touch….or she might, if she’s reckless, give it up, but that’s rare”. In contrast, “A white girl might just give it up right then”. The reader is given an insight into the speaker’s opinion concerning racial depictions of girls.

Diaz points out not only stereotypes, but also the extent to which a person’s upbringing and race can determine his or her behavior. In doing so, Diaz emphasizes the way in which the social forces of race and class undercut both individuality and objectivity. If our actions are determined by our race and class, where is there room for individuality? If our response to others is determined by race and social class, are we courting an individual or a racial/social archetype? To deal with another human being as a racial or social archetype rather than as an individual is to trade in stereotypes. The narrator’s advice is depended on his subjective experience of race and class, rather than the consideration of each human being as an individual, possessed of unique responses and desires. He plays at presenting the reader with unbiased truths, but if a reader looks beyond the authoritative tone, he or she can see that this advice is no doubt depended on the narrator’s personal experience of these racial and social groups. This observation is further evidenced by Diaz’s inclusion of a moment where the narrator’s advice falters and breaks down in the face of a girl whose actions move beyond the realm of stereotype and into that of individuality: “She will cross her arms, say, I hate my tits. Stroke her hair but she will pull away. I don’t like anybody touching my hair, she will say. She will act like somebody you don’t know”. At this point, the girl is acting like someone the narrator does not know, someone who does not fit neatly into a racial stereotype. She is an individual, possessed of her own unique insecurities. She is a human being more than an archetype, and this confounds the advice of the narrator. This moment is Diaz’s reminder that we are all more than the categories into which we fit, and that no fit is perfect.

“How to date a Browngirl, Blackgirl, Whitegirl, or Halfie” is an interesting story about a person explaining to the reader how to successfully go on a date with girls of various ethnicities, and when accepted as nothing more than that, is quite entertaining. However, this seemingly innocent story is revealed to be a powerful statement about racial prejudices in America when the text is broken down and the internal messages are brought into light. The narrator shows that, while some people may consider racism something from the past, others still have strong feelings about the different people of America.

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