The Great Gatsby

Analyzing The Life Of Jay Gatsby As Depicted In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Novel The Great Gatsby

November 8, 2021 by Essay Writer

Throughout The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald represents the unforgiving reality of life through the depiction of Jay Gatsby’s intense love for Daisy Buchanan. Right before Nick departs from New York City, he returns to Gatsby’s house and walks out onto the deck for one last time:

And as I sat there brooding on the old, unknown world, I thought of Gatsby’s wonder when he first picked out the green light at the end of Daisy’s dock. He had come a long way to this blue lawn, and his dream must have seemed so close that he could hardly fail to grasp it. He did not know that it was already behind him, somewhere back in that vast obscurity beyond the city, where the dark fields of the republic rolled on under the night. Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that’s no matter – to-morrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther…and one fine morning–. So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past (193)

This scene not only represents how Gatsby lived his life, but why his life ended as it did. Gatsby tried to take his past and make it his present. However, that is not how time works. The words “he did not know that it was already behind him” sum up Gatsby’s reality. Because he and Daisy were in love before he left for the war, Gatsby thought she would pause her time to wait for him. Even more so, the only reason he bought the house he lived in was because its dock was directly across from the green light, which was at the end of Daisy’s dock. Gatsby’s “dream” of grabbing the green light is a metaphor for grabbing Daisy back into his life. Even though the green light is across the bay from him, and even though he reaches out for the light everyday, he can never grab it. Thus, he can never ‘grab’ Daisy back into his life like he wants. Earlier in the novel, Daisy tries to tell Gatsby this when she says: “Oh, you want too much… I love you now – isn’t that enough? I can’t help what’s past” (141-142). Daisy implores that even though she still loves Gatsby, she is married to Tom and that will not change. Daisy is trying to let Gatsby down easy, as her words “I can’t help what’s past” signal that she did enjoy her past, but that her present and future existence includes being with Tom, not Gatsby. Nonetheless, Gatsby continues to try and win Daisy over. In fact, Daisy’s poor driving is what leads to Gatsby’s death. Gatsby died trying to recreate his past. The line “so we beat on, boats against the current” compares humans in boats on the sea to humans and time. Additionally, it symbolizes Gatsby’s position in the world. As the open waters wait for no one, neither does time. Gatsby, with all his wealth and connections, thought he could break that concept, but nonetheless he could not. Thus, as Gatsby tried to win back his past, the present sped past him, leaving him in the dust. Daisy knew this. Nick knew this. Gatsby did not, and that is why he died.

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A Detailed Study Of Jay Gatsby’s Character As Depicted In The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald’s

November 8, 2021 by Essay Writer

Jay Gatsby is a character that is full of mystery. Throughout the early chapters, there are many details of Gatsby that are left unexplained. It is revealed that Gatsby was actually born into poverty and worked his way up from there. In chapter 6, Fitzgerald includes Gatsby’s thoughts, specifically Gatsby’s idealism. Gatsby not only wants to rise from poverty, but he also wants to be above the world with his wealth. Gatsby

To help describe Gatsby’s idealism, Fitzgerald creates an image. Fitzgerald likens Gatsby’s ambitions to a “secret place” that “is above the trees”. These descriptions make it evident that Gatsby does not want to stay in the same social class, but move up and become an elite. The book previously explains that Gatsby was at one point poor, and Daisy’s family disapproved of him because he was poor. It might appear that Gatsby wants wealth so that he can be with Daisy, but this is not the case. Fitzgerald creates an image of a ladder that connects the secret place that Gatsby wants to the ground. Gatsby realizes that this ladder must be “climbed alone”, meaning that he does not intend to take Daisy with him. In this secret place, Gatsby has access to the “incomparable milk of wonder”. He does not intend to just become a wealthy person, but become so wealthy that he touches the supernatural. Nick has previously described Gatsby as “the Son of God”. This adequately describes Gatsby. He is a man, but at the same time, his wealth is so expansive that he is almost not human.

It is clear what Gatsby’s motives are, but the method Gatsby uses to get what he wants should be explored. Although he clearly wants to marry Daisy, he does not appear to love Daisy. Fitzgerald writes that he did not kiss Daisy until he was finished hearing a “tuning fork that had been struck upon a star”. This language makes it seem like their kiss was not spontaneous, but planned. If their kiss was spontaneous, there would not be a need for Gatsby to listen for any kind of sign. The kiss holds more significance outside of being just an expression of love. Fitzgerald explains that this kiss would “forever wed his unutterable visions to her perishable breath”. Here, Gatsby thinks that in order for him to become wealthy, he needs to marry Daisy. He does not want her because he loves her personality or her company. He wants her because he has projected all his fantasies of a wealthy life into her. Daisy comes from an elite home, and Gatsby wants to be part of the elite. But Fitzgerald knows that Daisy will not be able to satisfy Gatsby, as Daisy’s breath’s is described as “perishable” and Gatsby’s visions are “unutterable”. After kissing Daisy, Fitzgerald says that the “incarnation was complete”. The word incarnation means that a person embodies a deity.

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The Admirable And Despicable Characters In The Great Gatsby

November 8, 2021 by Essay Writer

There are many popular compositions from the past that are in that specific time period, then are forgotten about. However, some novels are popular generation after generation. Francis Scott Fitzgerald is recognized as one of the greatest American writers of the twentieth century. One of his most popular works is The Great Gatsby. This characters in The Great Gatsby will analyze how the character of each person is demonstrated through action in the face of prosperity. It is very evident which characters are the most admirable and which are despicable.

An admirable character in the novel is the narrator, Nick Carraway. In the beginning, Nick has always been an outcast that is seen as more practical and has integrity. As the story progresses, Nick’s character lossens up a bit due to the fact that he is surrounded by chaos watching the people around him chasing the American Dream. Nick has always been a neutral character by being a confidant, being loyal and by keeping his judgements to himself. Nick is the only character who volunteered to be Gatsby’s friend, offering him advice about Daisy. One of Nick’s best character traits is that he tends to pick out the best in people, even if they are feigned. This is evident when he befriends Gatsby. After Gatsby takes a trip down memory lane discussing his past with Nick, Nick says, “They’re a rotten crowd. You’re worth the whole damn bunch put together”. This part in the novel demonstrated how Nick thought Gatsby was a good person, regardless of the people around him.

One of the most despicable characters in the novel is Daisy Buchanan. Daisy seems to only do things that are convenient for herself. She is a very manipulative character, which she tries to hide by playing the innocent girl. The only character who sees right through that is her cousin, Nick Carraway. It is a shame for the characters who do not see through it, such as Gatsby. Daisy always knew Gatsby was in love with her, which is why it is so easy for her to take advantage of him. She knows that Jay would do anything and everything for her. When they reunite after 5 years, Gatsby is suddenly financially stable and he thinks the way to win her back is to flaunt his wealthy lifestyle. Daisy “forces” Gatsby to get close to her by having an emotional affair with him, uses him and takes almost everything away from him, goes back to Tom, then she is responsible for his death. Even her own cousin, Nick no longer believes she is a good hearted person. After Daisy and Tom flee West Egg, Nick shows he is distraught, “They were careless people, Tom and Daisy — they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made…”. Figuratively speaking, the “things and creatures” Tom and Daisy smash up in the novel is Gatsby’s life. Literally speaking, Tom and Daisy smash up Gatsby’s car and Myrtle. Daisy plays a big role in the ending due to the fact that if she chose Gatsby or herself over Tom, the circumstances would be different.

Jay Gatsby is a despicable character due to the fact that all of his motives are for himself. He starts to demonstrate this when he befriends Nick, Daisy’s cousin. Nick gets an invitation to one of Gatsby’s parties. Nick attends only to be approached by Jordan Baker telling him that Gatsby wants to know if Nick will invite Daisy to his house so Jay can come over. When Daisy is over, Gatsby “coincidentally” was knocking on Nick’s door. Gatsby visits with Nick and Daisy for a little while until he invites both of them to show off his wealth to Daisy in the hopes she will love him again. Most of the novel, Nick and Gatsby really only talk about Daisy, making their friendship artificial. Near the end of the novel, Daisy, Nick, Gatsby, Tom and Jordan go to the Plaza Hotel. When they are there, there is some turmoil brews. Gatsby is ruining his own life trying to get Daisy back, including Tom’s as well. Gatsby does not care what he has to do, even if that means ripping a family apart, to relive the past. Gatsby tells Tom, “She never loved you, do you hear? She only married you because I was poor and she was tired of waiting for me. It was a terrible mistake, but in her heart she never loved anyone except me!”. At this point, Gatsby shows his true colours by hurting people in the process of getting what he wants.

Tom Buchanan is another despicable character. At the very beginning of the novel, Tom is planning to meet him mistress, Myrtle Wilson, with Nick. Right away, Tom shows lack of respect for his own wife. Tom keeps his mistress a secret for a while, revealing that he is a coward not to end his marriage. When Myrtle and Tom get into an argument about Daisy, Tom hits Myrtle and breaks her nose. This reveals that Tom thinks he can do whatever he wants, whether that means cheating on his wife and hitting his mistress. Tom does not pay much attention to Daisy until he finds out Gatsby loves her. Tom tries to defend himself by insulting Daisy, “The trouble is that sometimes she gets foolish ideas in her head and doesn’t know what she’s going”. Tom also implies that he himself is a racist based on the books he reads, “This fellow has worked out the whole thing. It’s up to us, who are the dominant race, to watch out or these other races will have control of things”. This is evidence that Tom is arrogant, thinks he is superior and thinks he thinks he is entitled to do anything he so pleases. Not to mention, Tom is also the character who told George Wilson that Gatsby was the one who killed his wife, knowing that Gatsby would get killed.

In conclusion, from this essay it is evident which characters are admirable and which ones are despicable shown through their actions. Each character shows their strengths and weaknesses that lead to each of their individual downfalls. The American Dream was intended to improve life, not do the exact opposite.

Essay Score 12/20

Focus

2/4

Organization

3/4

Voice

2/4

Sentence Structure

2/4

Evidence and Details

3/4

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Jay Gatsby and Society in “The Great Gatsby” by F. Scott Fitzgerald

November 8, 2021 by Essay Writer

The Great Gatsby

In the novel, The Great Gatsby the author creates a corruptive and harmful society for the protagonist Jay Gatsby. He fails in multiple instances throughout the novel to reach success. In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel Jay Gatsby gets inescapably pressured by society and is corrupted. Gatsby’s relationship with Daisy ended up going on hold due to his overseas shipment to the Army during World War 1. When he returned from the Army he was persistent and determined to go up in social standards so he could stand out to Daisy and so that he could win her over. Although Gatsby was very tenacious in his attempts to acquire money he failed to do so legally, so he began bootlegging, and taking part in other illegal activities.

Gatsby began to hold parties in his mansion due his failure in getting legal money, but succeeding in getting money illegally. This goes to show that the 1920s, otherwise known as the Roaring 20s, were a time period when the culture was based of wealth and social status. Gatsby went to extremes to gain his place in his societies social scale. He partook in mysterious activities such, gambling, and bootlegging. Jay Gatsby was someone who honored his country in World War 1, and following the war went as low as he needed in order to achieve his dream of being together with Daisy. The standards of this time period show that if your not at the top of the social spectrum you won’t achieve your dreams or gain respect from society. Also in the novel a frequency is the amount of lies told about personal history mainly with regards to Jay Gatsby. Gatsby was essentially letting people use his house for parties, and was fine with that, and the fact that they knew nothing valid about him. He makes it known that he “went to Oxford”.

Throughout the story it becomes known that Gatsby is not comfortable in his own skin, and doesn’t believe that he is capable of achieving anything as his true self. Through those types of scenarios, Fitzgerald paints the upper class and those aspiring to become part of the elite in a negative light. When only Nick, Gatsby’s father, and a few of his servants attend Jay Gatsby’s funeral, it’s evidence that he leaves no lasting memory behind in the constantly forward-moving world. This ties dissatisfaction with the empty culture with the idea that focusing on greed and obtaining more does not breed personal connection. Gatsby was satisfied with not being himself, getting illegal money, and keeping his circle small.

Essay Score 14/20

Focus

4/4

Organization

3/4

Voice

3/4

Sentence Structure

3/4

Evidence and Details

1/4

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Jay Gatsby’s Greatness As Seen In F. Scott Fitzgerald The Great Gatsby

November 8, 2021 by Essay Writer

According to late civil rights advocist Dorothy Height, greatness is “not measured by what a man or woman accomplishes, but by the opposition he or she has overcome to reach his goals.” Height’s declaration embodies the idea that dedication to a vision, rather than the end result, is the true way to measure the concept of greatness. In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel The Great Gatsby, James Gatz, who later takes on the name Jay Gatsby, is a poor midwesterner in his youth, hoping to attract the attention of his former lover, Daisy Buchanan. There’s just one problem: Daisy’s already married to another man, who happens to be extremely wealthy. In an attempt to impress her and rekindle their love, Gatsby accumulates wealth in mysterious ways, and many speculate that he was involved in criminal activity. Contrary to the belief that he was a foolish lover and dishonest criminal, Jay Gatsby was an ambitious young man whose incredible drive and passion for a successful life classifies him as great.

Since he was a young boy, James Gatz dreamed of leaving his life in poverty. Opportunity struck and after a chance encounter with Dan Cody, a wealthy copper mogul, Gatz ran away from home at the age of seventeen to learn the ways of the rich (Fitzgerald 98). This milestone marks the death of poor farmhand James Gatz and the birth of the sensational persona whom he strives to be: Jay Gatsby. Throughout the rest of the novel, Gatsby consistently maintains the enigmatic personality he crafted, only breaking character on a few occasions. Gatsby transforms himself from a “clam-digger and salmon-fisher” (Fitzgerald 98) into a charismatic and charming young man with “one of those rare smiles with a quality of eternal reassurance in it, that you may come across four of five times in life” (Fitzgerald 48). Furthermore, Gatsby had to overcome enormous obstacles along his journey. Before Gatsby became the rich host of his lavish parties, he was “a penniless young man without a past” (Fitzgerald 149). Entering the realm of the rich, Gatsby was at a considerable disadvantage; he had no connections, no friends, and most importantly, no money. The sizable inheritance he was slated to receive from the late Dan Cody was stolen from him by Cody’s mistress. Gatsby only knew the mannerisms of the wealthy which he had learned from his time spent as Cody’s associate. Nevertheless, he persevered through these hardships and eventually ended up owning a “colossal affair… a factual imitation of some Hôtel de Ville in Normandy, with a tower on one side, spanking new under a thin beard of raw ivy, and a marble swimming pool, and more than forty acres of lawn and garden” (Fitzgerald 5). Gatsby, coming from a poor family living in the middle of nowhere, ends up owning an enormous and beautiful mansion in one of the most affluent towns in the country. Despite how impressive this is, may be, some, including literary critic Claire Stocks, denounce Gatsby’s success as a fraud due to his criminal activities. In her analysis of the novel, Stocks states that, “The eponymous hero of the novel, we soon discover, is a liar and a criminal. He is arguably [not] ‘great’…” (Stocks). However, Stocks and others fail to realize that Gatsby’s criminal activities are besides the point. Gatsby understood the risks he was taking when he engaged in activities such as bootlegging; if he was caught, he would suffer jail time and his entire persona would be ruined. Even in the face of these consequences, Gatsby was still determined enough to work towards his goal at any means necessary. Something as impactful as the law may have deterred others, but not Gatsby, who would not let anything stand in the way of his pursuit of wealth. How Gatsby obtained his wealth is not important, as the facts don’t change. He was still originally a rural farm-boy who ended up immensely wealthy. This monumental leap is not something any ordinary person can accomplish. Gatsby’s progress in the face of adversity demonstrates his resolve and ultimate success in surmounting the hardships of his upbringing and attaining the wealth he longed for.

As a self-made man, Jay Gatsby had only his own ambition and will to depend on. Gatsby’s extreme discipline stemmed from his youth, and grew into a lifelong hunger for success and perfection. Evidence of this can be found within his boyhood planners that he used to map out his day. Every hour of his life was meticulously outlined with useful activities that would help to improve himself, such as “Study electricity”, “Study needed inventions” and “Practice elocution, poise and how to attain it” (Fitzgerald 173). Gatsby’s planning of his early life exposed him to the path of success he would travel down later. While most other children his age would be playing with friends or loitering around, Gatsby had the desire to advance his own education and character in search for a better future. After attaining wealth and elite social status, Gatsby still carefully manages his life and appearance. Even in the midst of his own wild party, “he was not drinking [which] set him off from his guests… as the fraternal hilarity increased” (Fitzgerald 50). Those attending Gatsby’s large parties tend to get roaring drunk within a short time, but Gatsby restrains himself because he wants to keep up his polished and formal appearance in order to impress others and make respectable connections. Just like his childhood, Gatsby willingly sacrifices having a good time in exchange for gains in character. However admirable Gatsby’s work ethic seems, Stocks once again finds an obscure way to criticize him by pointing out that Gatsby fails to achieve his goal in the end, saying “Tom [Daisy’s husband] has to protect his privileged position from the threat of ‘new money’ and he does so by destroying Gatsby, both literally and metaphorically. [His] revelation of Gatsby’s true origins signals the beginning of the end for him, and [he is killed shortly after]” (Stocks). Yet, Stocks doesn’t consider the fact that Gatsby knew he and Tom would eventually have to confront each other and yet Gatsby had the courage to not give up on his dream and attempt to defeat Tom, his final obstacle. Gatsby’s failure is insignificant because it doesn’t change the sheer will and drive that he possessed throughout his journey. During both his childhood and his adult life, Gatsby shows remarkable self-discipline and a strong desire for success, both of which contribute to his greatness.

When one looks back upon the life of Jay Gatsby, a single characteristic stands out more than anything else: ambition. From when he was a child, Gatsby demonstrated his determination to greatly improve his life through his intense work-ethic and fastidious planning. In the span of his short, thirty-two year life, Gatsby ascended the social ladder, going from a poor, rural boy with no foreseeable future to a fabulously wealthy and charming member of the American elites. Stepping back to look at Gatsby’s journey as a whole, the obstacles he faced on his path to success were insurmountably high. The fact that he possessed the drive for perfection, the resolve to be simply better than what he was, is the true reflection of his character and what makes Jay Gatsby “great”.

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Transcendentalism in Characters: Chris Mccandless, Mary Anne Bell and Jay Gatsby

April 13, 2021 by Essay Writer

Self-discovery is defined as “the act or process of achieving self-knowledge”(Merion Webster). Every story has a beginning and an end, but in between, the characters all have different types of experiences. From an experience, a character often comes to a realization/revelation about their journey/ life. These revelations can influence the characters thoughts, actions, and beliefs or in other words, they can change the character into a completely different person. In the book’s The Great Gatsby, Into the Wild, and The Things They Carried characters Jay Gatsby, Chris McCandless, and Mary Anne Bell all come to realizations about who they are or who they strive to be and had gone through crucial self-discoveries that completely changed them.

In The Great Gatsby, we observe the life of the main character Jay Gatsby through the eyes of his next door neighbor and friend Nick Carraway. At first look, Gatsby seems like he lives a great life: he lives in a mansion, owns fancy cars, throws extravagant parties, etc. However, when you get to know him, like Nick did, you will see that his life isn’t so perfect after all. Jay Gatsby was born James Gatz to a family of farmers in North Dakota. From a young age, Gatz despise the poor and sought to one day be wealthy. His journey to wealth would begin when he met a rich man named Dan Cody. One day, a young Gatz was working on Lake Superior and saw a massive yacht in the middle of the lake. However a big storm was aproaching so Gatz went out into the middle of the lake to warn the owner of the boat. The owner, Dan Cody, was so thankful for the warning he offered Gatsby a job as his assistant. In order to achieve his goal of becoming wealthy James Gatz would change his name to Jay Gatsby and accept the job offer: starting a new life that was detached from his upbringing. Money was only important to Gatsby because he was in love with a girl named Daisy Buchannan. He knew Daisy would never love him as a poor man and so he spent his entire life trying to be someone else. Gatsby thought the only thing that would make him happy in life was Daisy and that the only way to get Daisy was with money. This thought process led to Gatsby to believe that money could buy happiness. However, once Gatsby saw that Daisy didn’t want to be with him, even with all of his money, he came to the conclusion or self discovery that money does not make you happy. A major theme in The Great Gatsby is the acquisition of wealth and social ranking. Reader’s find out that Gatsby lives a sad and lonely life : sells illegal alcohol, lives alone, chases after a woman who doesn’t want to be with him, no one attends his funeral, etc. Jay Gatsby had all the money he desired, but the one thing he didn’t have was true happiness. Gatsby’s self discovery deepens my understanding of the theme by inferencing that people in society were chasing after the wrong things; instead of trying to be happy in the life they had, characters spent their whole life trying to obtain some greater sense of happiness but would end up living a miserable life instead. If the characters were to just live in the moment, maybe there life wouldn’t be so bad after all.

Another person who sought happiness was Chris McCandless. In the book Into The Wild, the main character Chris McCandless had attended Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia and was your typical college student. However, unlike most people in college, McCandless was fed up with the materialism of the world. Later on, Chris would come to the discovery that in order for him to be truly happy, he would need to become a transcendentalist and isolate himself from the rest of civilization. In order to achieve this goal, McCandless, like Jay Gatsby, changed his name to Alexander Supertramp and traveled into the Alaskan wilderness. An important theme throughout the book is Valuing Principals over People. One of the best parts about McCandless was that he stuck to his principles. He lived by his anti-materialism to the fullest extent: giving away all of his money to charity and kept as few possessions as he possibly could. However, while this is admirable of Chris, he seems to put his principles above people, which leads him to cause unintended pain in his loved ones. For example, in college Chris decided he would no longer hand out or accept gifts because he had a moral problem with them. While this decision is based on Chris’s principals it hurt his family(loved ones). Chris’s realization is also an example of him valuing principals over his loved ones. Chris went to Alaska because he believed it was the only way he could find true happiness but in doing so he hurt his family (by leaving them). Since Chris decided to leave, it shows that he values his principals over the people he cares for.

Finally, In the book The Things They Carried, Mark Fossie is a young medic who invites his high school sweetheart Marry Anne Bell to come live with him while he fights in the Vietnam war. He came up with the idea from Eddie Diamond, the highest ranking man within his company, who faticously suggests that the area where the soldiers were occupied was so safe that you could bring a girl to the camp. Fossie seems very intrigued by this idea and would write a letter to Marry Anne Bell inviting her to come to Vietnam. A few weeks later, a young and innocent Marry Anne Bell arrives in Vietnam. However, little did she know her whole life was about to change. For the first two weeks her and Mark Fossie had a grand time; they would hang out like they did back in Highschool. Additionally, it seemed like Mark had achieved his goal of bringing his experiences from America to Vietnam. This would soon change as Marry Anne’s interest for the war skyrocketed. She would start off by learning how to assemble, fire, and clean weaponry. Marry Anne Bell was very eager to learn about fighting in the war. As a result, she would join the Green Berets on their nighttime ambushes. Acting more like a soldier, after a few weeks Marry Anne Bell decided to look like one too. Because most of her time was now spent fighting the North Vietnam and the Vietcong’s, Bell did not have time to worry about her hygiene/personal appearance. Additionally, she would cut her hair short and tie and green bandana around it. Because Marry Anne was so involved with the combat of the war, she would spend less time with her boyfriend who is unhappy about her transformation. As a result, Mark Fossie makes arrangements for Marry Anne Bell to be sent back to the US.

However, Marry Anne refuses to go back to America and would disappear for a few days. When Marry Anne returns a few days later she goes right past mark and into the special forces tent. Mark would take a peek into the tent and notice that Marry Anne was wearing the same outfit she had worn when she came to Vietnam: A pink sweater, and a skirt. However, when Fossie approached Marry Anne, he noticed that she was wearing a necklace of human tongues! Marry Anne tries to convince Fossie that what she was doing was necessary but Fossie didn’t buy it. A major theme in this book is that war is a transformative experience. Mary Anne Bell contributes to this theme by changing from a pretty girl who wore pink sweaters to a ruthless killer who wears tongues around her neck. Bells experiences also draw a parallel to what most young solders went through in Vietnam. The transformation of Marry Ann Bell also furthers my understanding of the theme by showing that war can transform any one even an innocent young girl.

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A Character Analysis of Jay Gatsby

April 13, 2021 by Essay Writer

Jay Gatsby the hero of the 1925 F. Scott Fitzgerald novel. An artful culmination depicted and propelled the American Literature. The writers and readers, apparently appreciate this secretive character. However, for what reason do we, as readers, cherish characters like Gatsby? Since they’re mind boggling achievers who appear to twist destiny to their will? Who appear to create their own particular predetermination? Also, isn’t that what ‘flexibility’ is about. Jay Gatsby once named ‘James Gatz’ yet later on transformed it to ‘Jay Gatsby’. He is a country cultivate kid experiencing childhood in North Dakota without associations, cash, or education, Jimmy Gatz had an plan: he would get away from his conditions and become famous. What’s more, fortunately, his father has spared his plan. It’s a long story, yet it merits citing in full. From there on, as per the storyteller, Nick Carraway, said that, Gatsby is a well off person and the proprietor of a costly mansion wherein lavish occasions are consistently facilitated. All in the hopes to win Daisy back. The book spoke to that he is an exceptionally fascinating character. He has a wide range of characteristics and displays every one particularly. Be that as it may, when you make a stride back and take a gander at him in general, he is an exceptionally deceived man. He trusts the way to the best future is a total reclamation of the past. He doesn’t comprehend the progression of time and how it changes individuals. In any case, Gatsby’s character speaks to all that is great in this novel and its does not shock anyone that he is a standout amongst other characters in American Literature.

He is viewed as ‘awesome’ in a confusing sense. Gatsby is viewed as ‘incredible’ by the estimation of dreams, his riches, his overwhelming identity, the celebrations and good humor that, to others in the novel, stamp him as a man of high stature and nearly god-like in individual extents. By a similar token, in an apparently conflicting movement, his significance is set apart by our wonder of him, as we watch his eager interest for the acknowledgment of his dark esteems and the desire of adoration and riches that come so near realization, yet remain, agonizingly, simply distant.

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Relationships Between Jay Gatsby and Daisy in the Great Gatsby

April 13, 2021 by Essay Writer

Does Jay Gatsby love Daisy? After reading the book, that is the question that one is left with. Perhaps, when they first met, but afterwards, Daisy, as a member of “[the] distinguished secret society” is the symbol and the image for what Gatsby aspires to achieve.

Young Jay Gatsby, an officer in the army first meets Daisy Fay when the other officers gathered at her house to compete for the attention of Daisy. Gatsby, meeting Daisy and seeing her wealth “falls in love” with her and her house. This creates Gatsby’s dream to have enough wealth and status to marry Daisy. Gatsby’s love seems to encompass everything that Daisy is- status, social class, wealth, beauty- the epitome of what Gatsby longed for growing up in North Dakota as a penniless farmer.

The reunion of Gatsby and Daisy at Nick’s house reveals Gatsby’s core values of what he believes will win Daisy back. When the initial shock of meeting a long lost love had diminished, and Gatsby realizes that Daisy is happy to see him, Gatsby suggests a tour of his mansion. He shows Daisy his golden hairbrush, his decorated bedrooms, and his gaudy shirt collection just to show off his wealth. Gatsby, instead of using his charm to win Daisy back, believes that his rekindling of his relationship with Daisy would stem from the seeds of wealth.

When Nick, our narrator, attempts to pinpoint the eloquence and the tinkle in Daisy’s voice, Gatsby instantly recognizes it as “full of money”. This ties back to Gatsby’s love of “things” and monetary wealth. This is the main argument of the questioning of Gatsby’s love. As readers, we recognize Fitzgerald’s flamboyant and intricate style, and he would not skive off describing Daisy’s voice- Fitzgerald purposely does not describe Gatsby’s romantic love for Daisy. Daisy, in the eyes of Gatsby, is personified as money, and Gatsby wishes to obtain it to supplement his wealth. Daisy is no more to him than a house or a Rolls Royce.

On the fateful night when Myrtle was struck and killed, Gatsby discloses to Nick that Daisy was “the first “nice” girl he’d ever known”. Note the quotations around “nice”. This statement is an earthshaking quote that forces the reader to reimagine what they believe Gatsby truly loved. Gatsby did not believe that her personality was enjoyable to be around, Gatsby thought Daisy was nice because of all the wealth she had. Gatsby had never before been so close to a rich girl, and therefore Daisy was the first.

Another hint that Fitzgerald gives is that Daisy is symbolized as a “golden girl”. A type of girl that would win the beauty pageant, a type of girl that would be prom queen. But this is not what Gatsby sees. Even Nick, her cousin, recognizes the unique and alluring voice of Daisy. But all Gatsby sees and hears is the money in her voice, the money in her beauty. To Gatsby, the “golden girl” is not so much about the girl as the gold, and this is shows beyond doubt that Gatsby did not love Daisy.

The things that Gatsby does for Daisy can be seen as romantic. Perhaps they were, as an ulterior motive. But in the deepest part of his heart, all Gatsby wants is to marry Daisy to achieve his goal- to go up the social ladder. Perhaps Gatsby loves Daisy for her money she represents. But it cannot be questioned that Gatsby’s “love” for Daisy encompasses not only Daisy, but the whole upper class that she belongs to. Daisy to Gatsby was a step along the process to achieve his goal of status, and therefore that was Gatsby’s obsession.

From his childhood, Jay Gatsby hated and despised the way that he and his family lived, and tried his hardest to change their way of living. He taught himself how to act and speak like a member of the upper class. So when Daisy came along, he jumped at the opportunity to climb up the social ladder. Daisy was the last step on the ladder. Daisy is important, the most important thing to Gatsby not because he loved her as a person, but as the last step to his target of status.

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The Phenomenon of American Dream in the Great Gatsby

April 13, 2021 by Essay Writer

Did Gatsby ever achieve the American Dream? F. Scott Fitzgerald’s fictional novel, “The Great Gatsby,” shows how a dream can become corrupted by one’s focus on acquiring wealth, power, and expensive things. Jay Gatsby, the main character in the novel, is a self-made man who started out poor, and makes most of his money by illegally selling alcohol. Some people say that Gatsby did achieve the American Dream, but despite his wealth, he was unable to live a happy, successful lifestyle as Fitzgerald shows how this dream is full of materialism.

The American Dream is a lot of things. One of them is knowing who you are. When Nick was young, his father said to him, “Whenever you feel like criticizing anyone, just remember that all the people in this world haven’t had the advantages that you’ve had.” (pg.5) By criticizing others for no apparent reason, the results, being judgmental. Toward the end of the novel, Nick says, “They were careless people, Tom and Daisy—they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness, or whatever it was that kept them together, and let other people clean up the mess they had made…” (pg.187-188) Another example of the American Dream is to not be selfish. Being selfish, or greed, can only lead to failure, and to the downfall of society. Some consider Gatsby as a selfish man because he prefers

to do what’s best for him rather than what’s best for those around him. For example, Gatsby doesn’t care about the consequences of having an affair with Daisy. The fact that she has already started a life with Tom and even has a daughter, it doesn’t bother Gatsby; he just wants to be with Daisy just like the good old days.

The American Dream is something that can always be pursued, or accomplished. Nick says, “I thought of Gatsby’s wonder when his first picked out the green light at the end of Daisy’s dock. He had come a long way to this blue lawn and his dream most have seemed so close that he could hardly fail to grasp it. He did not know that it was already behind him, somewhere back in the vast obscurity beyond the city, where the dark fields of the republic rolled on under the night.” (pg.189) But sadly, Gatsby didn’t achieve it even when he setted high goals for his dream. Gatsby says to Tom, “Can’t repeat the past?” he cried incredulously. “Why of course you can!” He looked around him widely, as if the past were lurking here in the shadow of his house, just out of reach of his hand. “I’m going to fix everything just the way it was before,” he said, nodding determinedly. “She’ll see.” (pg.116-117) Gatsby’s dream is to be with Daisy, but lost it because he always goes back to his past when he should forward to the future.

And last, but not least, the America Dream is all about letting go. Nick says, “Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that’s no matter—tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther…. And one fine morning—So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.” By dwelling in the past can result in obsession and misfortune. But by letting go of the past, achieving the American Dream could’ve been easier.

Gatsby is considered throughout the story an anti-hero, being selfish and dishonest man, and having low moral standards. These are some of the main reasons why Gatsby didn’t achieve the American Dream. He’s considered as an anti-hero because he doesn’t risk his life saving people nor does he show any signs of courage. He is considered as a dishonest man, for the obvious reason, lying about his past and present. He tries convincing people that he attended Oxford University and received medals by multiple European countries during WWI. He also claims to own multiple drugstores. In reality, Gatsby attended college at St. Olaf’s in Minnesota, but dropped out after two weeks and is obtaining his wealth by bootlegging. The only reason how he has knowledge about being rich is because of Dan Cody, who he became friends with.

As you can see, Gatsby isn’t Mr. Perfect; he has flaws. He obtains his money illegally and behaves immorally. Gatsby lies and sins, but does it all for love and happiness. Being selfish, corruptive, having low moral standards, and most importantly, being dishonest are the main signs why Gatsby never achieved the American Dream. Although he isn’t the typical hero that enthralled everyone with his courage and charisma, he is still a great man who is crucial to the story because he simply represents the average human being.

F. Scott Fitzgerald effectively offers a powerful critique of a materialistic society and the effects it can have on one’s hopes and dreams. Gatsby is so blinded by his dream that he doesn’t realize that money cannot buy love or happiness. He’s surrounded by this materialism and discontent, which serves to tarnish his dream of success.

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Role of Colors in the Great Gatsby

April 13, 2021 by Essay Writer

The Great Gatsby Symbolism Essay

The Hidden Story in Green and White

Colour symbolism is really popular in novels written during the 1920’s. One such example is Scott Fitzgerald’s novel The Great Gatsby. There is much colour symbolism in this novel, but there are two main colours that stand out more than the others. The colours green and white influence the story greatly. Green shows many thoughts, ideas, attitudes, and choices that Gatsby has throughout the story. White represents the stereotypical fa that every character is hiding behind.

The colour green, as it is used in the novel, symbolizes different choices the character, Gatsby, can make during his life. The green element in this novel is taken from the green light at the end of the dock near Daisy’s house. The colour itself represents serenity, as in everything is perfect. This warns Gatsby that he should not pursue his dream for getting Daisy back, because his chance has passed and everything is as it should be. This is shown with Nick’s insight, “…His dream must have seemed so close that he could hardly fail to grasp it. He did not know that it was already behind him… (Pg.189)”

Another symbolization of the colour green, which contradicts the first, is the meaning “go.” As in a traffic light signal, most people associate green with the word and action “go.” This can be interpreted as meaning Gatsby should go for his dream without hesitation. It implies that Gatsby and Daisy are meant to be together and nothing should stop Gatsby from his destined happiness and love with Daisy. It inspires hope for Gatsby that he is on the right path, heading towards the best years of his life. He believes that things will soon be as they once were, only better. “”I’m going to fix everything just the way they were before,” he said nodding determinedly. “She’ll see.”(Pg. 117.)”

The last symbolization the colour green has in this novel is an urge to strive ahead in life, to do better in life and succeed. Gatsby changes his entire persona for a better, more sociable, image and status. He is constantly striving to be a more successful figure in society. Ever since he was a boy he put himself on a schedule with hopes for becoming a highly respected, well-known person. “He knew he had a big future in front of him. (Pg. 181),” his dad says about him. “Jimmy was bound to get ahead. He always had some resolves like this…(Pg. 182).”

White is the other colour symbolism interlaced into this novel. Where green only influenced one character, white has a wider range of influence on the characters. This colour symbolizes one thing, a fa, but it appears in every character. For example, Daisy is always seen wearing white, which gives her and innocent naive appearance. It is as though she uses that as an excuse for when she does something ridiculous or childish, making it seem like she does not know any better. In reality, she knows exactly what she does but just doesn’t care. She uses this little princess image and her money to hide her biased, snobbish, and conceited view of herself and her lifestyle. “They were careless people, Tom and Daisy–they smashed up things and creatures and then retreated back into their money or their vast carelessness or whatever it was that kept them together…(Pg. 187-188).”

Another character that hides behind the white symbolic fa is Jordan Baker. She also wears white quite often. She acts as though she is superior to everyone around her. Her posture, her attitude, and even the things she says imply this arrogance. “She was extended full length at her end of the divan, completely motionless and with her chin raised a little as if she were balancing something on it which was quite likely to fall. If she saw me she me out of the corner of her eyes she gave no hint of it-indeed I was almost surprised into murmuring an apology for having disturbed her by coming in. (Pg.13).” She portrays a bored and apathetic attitude about everything, which is part of her “I am too good for you” appearance. In reality, she just wants to be as respected and socially accepted as Gatsby. She is not willing to take responsibility for her actions and uses her image as a guard implying that she could not have possibly done anything immoral, much like Daisy.

However, “She was incurably dishonest. She wasn’t able to endure being at a disadvantage, and given this unwillingness I suppose she had begun dealing in subterfuges when she was very young in order to keep the cool insolent smile turned towards the world and yet satisfy the demands of her hard jaunty body. (Pg. 63).”

Colour symbolism is not very noticeable, yet it can tell a great deal about a story. In this case, the colours give the reader a look at the character’s choices and the paths he or she could have chosen compared to the ones the character chose, which adds dimension to the story. The green the different choices Gatsby can make, whether it serves as a warning, an inspiration, or an urge to get ahead. The white symbolizes a mask, or a fa. It allows the characters to portray themselves as a whole other person and hide who they really are. This puts a piece of reality into the story, as everyone wears a white mask of some kind to hide his or her true self from the world. It is the unsubtle clues given to the reader that are fascinating and allow a person to relate to the characters.

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