The Great Gatsby

American Dream in Great Gatsby

June 3, 2020 by Essay Writer

The Idea that Pervades Society The American dream is the longing of success that means a happy family and equal opportunity to go from rags to riches, through hard work. This idea is scene in a lot of places. On the picture by Margaret White, the poster proclaims: World’s Highest Standard of Living-There is no way like the American Way”. Or the headline of the newspaper story is “The American Dream, the subtitle is Doing Well by Doing Good. ” Examples of the American dream are almost invisible when looking at average Americans.

In the photograph, there are hungry people carrying buckets. None of them are white and none of them look remotely happy in front of the camera. This shows how not everyone can live the American Dream especially if they are barely getting by. Immigrants also failed to reach the American dream for reasons like not being able to speak English and lack of resources. Having a happy family is not easy either.

There is lots of conflict at home over the dinner table and no time for American adults to have fun once they have kids. It is unrealistic to expect fun when there is housework, bills to pay, and more.

Although it sounds good, it is a negative force in our society because it is just too good to be true. The American dream means equal opportunity to go from rags to riches. Sometimes, aggression may be necessary to get this “equal opportunity” due to circumstance. “At the time, most southern blacks could not share a water fountain, a beach, a bus seat, a school room, or a voting booth with southern whites. ” (Moser, and Watters) This barrier to civil rights meant that many were considered inferior and could not succeed because they were separate from the average American.

This shows that the American dream is unrealistic for blacks. Langston Hughes states how America should be a land “where Liberty is crowned with no false patriotic wreath, But opportunity is real, and life is free, Equality is in the air we breathe. ”(Hughes) However, he later asserts that “America never was America to me, And I swear this oath-America will be! ” (Hughes) This reiterates how this equal opportunity will be there in the future. Thus, showing how the American dream is currently unrealistic for them. Immigrants who were not American tried to go from rags to riches as well.

“Education was free. That subject my father had written about repeatedly, as comprising his chief hope for us children, the essence of American opportunity, the treasure that no thief could touch, not even misfortune or poverty. ” (Antin) This shows his belief in the equal opportunity in America. In the end, many of this people did not fully realize the dream and may have ended up in a worse financial situation than before. The Antin’s wound up losing everything after the storm on Crescent Beach. They could not achieve the success that the American dream entitled.

Her father was “master of no art, of no trade; that even his precious learning was no avail, because he had only the most antiquated methods of communicating it. ” (Antin) They did not expect this would matter but being immigrants put them at a disadvantage. It is clearly not achievable for the poorer Americans and immigrants who probably worked very hard but live in an oppressive society that values background over hard work. You need to be a white American gentleman to succeed like Tom who lives in East Egg. The American dream means a happy family with a nice house and all the amenities of civilization.

However, how can a family be happy when there is so much work to be done at home? “A good home life for a family of four took about 60 hours of nurturing work per week in 1982. That work may have been more physically arduous in the past, but never more complex than now. ” (Hayden) Today, it’s nowhere near that amount but it is still quite a load. On top of that, people are picky meaning that “part of homemaking involved seeing that each family member’s myriad personal needs are fully met. For example, “Home cooking requires meals prepared to suit the personal likes and dislikes of family members.(Hayden) How can the American dream be achieved when you worry so much about homemaking? The idea of a happy family ceases to exist because of this. Even rich people with all the amenities like the laundry machine, dishwashers, refrigerators, and stoves still have a lot to worry about. Rich people still need to worry though about their kid’s education and choose to private school their kids. However, “this puts more pressure on families, cutting them off from the diversity and connectedness of the proverbial village.

Poorer families without the same resources to send their children to school worry even more about this. There are exorbitant rates for the top state universities and federal aid is hard to come by. The journal of health and Social behavior published her findings that “adults with children experience depression and unhappiness in greater numbers. Our expectations that children guarantee a life filled with happiness, joy, excitement, contentment, satisfaction, and pride are an additional source of stress for all parents.

This shows that happiness is hard to achieve and many are dissatisfied because of the times when they have housework to do. A lot of the times, Mother’s in their sphere do not have many people to talk to except for other women. “Or it may come from husbands and children who finally notice when their wives and mothers break down. ” (Hayden) For example, Daisy in the Great Gatsby had a hard time dealing with Tom, who had a bad temper. “You did it, Tom, she said accusingly. I know you didn’t mean to but you did do it.

That’s what I get for marrying a brute of a man, a great big hulking physical specimen. ” (Fitzgerald 16) During this incident, Tom intentionally broke Daisy’s finger for no reason. Daisy was very upset about having to put up with this. This shows how not everyone is happy all the time. Later on at the end, Daisy was so upset about Tom’s mistress and almost left Tom for Gatsby. She states, “Why, -how could I love him-possibly? ” (Fitzgerald 139) This is in response to Gatsby telling her to state that she never loved him. In this case, “him” refers to Tom, who now desperately wants her back.

Even if a family is wealthy or poor, there is so much going on at home that people are likely to be unhappy. Although it sounds good, there are lots of problems in life preventing the American Dream from happening. Every day, there is housework, kids to take care of, and bills to pay. This makes home life frenetic all the time. Unless you can afford a housekeeper and somehow have a perfectly content family, you should not wish for the American Dream. The American dream is the longing of success that means a happy family and equal opportunity to go from rags to riches through hard work.

A lot of people decided to immigrate here in pursuit of this dream. Many of them were disappointed when it ended in failure although they worked hard. The American dream was simply out of their reach like with Mary Antin’s father. Therefore, the American Dream has a negative impact on our society because of its false promises that cannot be achieved by the overwhelming majority. So until you can guarantee equal opportunity, limited house work, and no home conflict the American dream will cease to exist.

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The Great Gatsby a book about the upper class during the 1920s

June 3, 2020 by Essay Writer

The Great Gatsby a book about the upper class during the 1920s. The economy was booming and poor people became rich quicker than ever before. When reading The Great Gatsby the reader immediately thinks about the money, parties, alcohol and the social life of the higher class. Love is actually an important theme throughout the book when you think about it and every character in the book has some kind of connection to love. Personally, I think the main relationship in the book is Gatsby’s and Daisy’s because a big part of the plot is about Gatsby and the things he does for her.

I am also going to discuss the marriage between Tom and Daisy and the other one between Myrtle and George. The book is told from Nick’s perspective so I am also going to analyze their feelings for each other.Tom and Daisy Buchanan have been married for three years and even if their relationship isn’t the most loving one, but they still had some kind of weird connection that kept them together during the whole book.

Tom is a very materialistic person who cares a lot about his social status and Daisy seems to be more of a status symbol than a wife to him. Tom isn’t a very loving person and he has a bitter personality. I think Tom is bitter because after his career as a polo player he hasn’t found anything interesting in life. I loved the fact that during a dinner Gatsby introduces Tom as the polo player to all the guests and drives Tom crazy. I think he did this just to clarify to everyone that he was one of the rich polo playing kids that inherited a lot of money. Tom’s personality makes Daisy’s and his relationship very shallow and official. Tom loves Daisy but she doesn’t seem to love him back.At the Plaza Hotel at the end of the book, Daisy revealed her feelings. First, she says that she has never loved Tom. But when Gatsby asks if it’s true she answers, I did love him once ” but I loved you too. I think Daisy has a hard time deciding who she loves because she wants to keep both Tom and Gatsby. I believe the biggest reason Daisy hasn’t left Tom yet is that they have a daughter.On the other hand, just by the way Tom acts you can see that he doesn’t love Daisy even though he says so. I think Tom’s affair with Myrtle proves how little Daisy means to him. He knows that Myrtle is married but doesn’t care because he has enough money and power to get anyone he wants. After reading the book it seems to me that Tom is a person who constantly wants more and can’t be satisfied. That’s also probably one of the reasons he sees Myrtle. Myrtle doesn’t seem happy about her and her husband’s financial situation. Their marriage does not seem to go very well either and George is the opposite to the cheerful and talkative Myrtle. The fact that Nick knows about Myrtle and Tom but hasn’t told Daisy irritates me a lot. Nick probably just feels that it isn’t his duty to tell Daisy about Myrtle. The connection between Gatsby and Daisy isn’t even comparable to the marriage between Tom and Daisy. They have a history that goes back before Tom and Daisy were married. When they first met in Louisville they both quickly noticed some kind of connection between them but shortly after that Gatsby had to leave to fight in the war. Everything that Gatsby did to be close to Daisy shows his love for her, from the house he bought to the parties that he arranged. Before he had the chance to meet her through Nick, the green light on Tom’s dock symbolized Daisy in his mind. I think Gatsby was addicted to her without really realizing it. And when Daisy said that she had loved Tom too he understood that he did not mean as much to her as she meant to him. But him taking the blame for killing Myrtle shows that he had a hard time understanding that Daisy maybe didn’t love him anymore. Maybe he thought that if he would take the blame Daisy would stay with him. The last relationship in the book is between Nick and Jordan. Nick met Jordan for the first time when he came over to Tom and Daisy to have dinner. Later in the book, Nick develops a real interest in her. I personally think that Nick likes Jordan because she is different and modern. Jordan is very independent and a very successful golfer. She was a good example of a flapper. During the 1920s the term Flappers became more popular. Flapper girls were independent, wore short skirts, drank alcohol openly and drove cars. Sadly their relationship ended when Nick saw how callous Jordan was when Myrtle died. My opinion is that Nicks partly used that as an excuse to try to leave the big mess and drama caused by Gatsby, Tom, and Daisy. In conclusion, this was a book full of love and drama. Love wasn’t a theme that I would normally bring up but I’m glad I did. Now I see the book and the characters from a whole new perspective. As I see it, not a single relationship in the book ended well. Not even Tom’s and Daisy’s. After Gatsby’s death they just left East Egg without as much as a note. I think the way Nick described them was genius so I am going to end with the quote, They were careless people, Tom and Daisy. They smashed up things and people, and then returned back into their money and their vast carelessness.

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The Great Gatsby Essay

June 3, 2020 by Essay Writer

The Great Gatsby (1925) by F. Scott Fitzgerald is not a novel based around gender, but it is an available reading position. By comparing the representations of female characters, we get an insight into the effects of gender stereotypes on individual lives, namely Daisy and Jordan. The role of men in 1920’s America is clear throughout as they all function in a similar, dominant way – earning all of the money causing women to be reliant on them. The way that each character’s gender affects their role in the story unintentionally highlights the inequality of this time.

Reading the novel from a contemporary western societal view gives a stark contrast and even though the book wasn’t based on gender, we can clearly see Fitzgerald’s traditional views on gender roles.

The representations of women throughout the novel are varying but each woman is oppressed by the same conservative attitudes. The attitudes of the time were that women were objects; something to show off at a party, but they should always submit to a man.

These were equally as enforced on Daisy and Jordan despite them living in New York away from the traditional Mid-West.

Daisy is the embodiment of a traditional golden girl which means she is compliant in the oppression of women. She marries rich despite loving another man, has a child and seems to do nothing but lounge around in her mansion. She functions as an accessory to Tom, something to use whenever he pleases. To Gatsby, she is an untouchable dream, so far away that she doesn’t seem human anymore. To both men, she is seen not as a person, but as something that fills any purpose they wish. Gatsby even says, “Her voice is full of money” (chapter 7) which illustrates how Daisy represents everything a man in the 20s desired.

Jordan is the opposite of Daisy, a truly modern woman. She disobeys every gender expectation that Daisy falls into. She earns all her own money (from sport nonetheless), is unmarried, and travels by herself. Even her androgynous name of Jordan disobeys all that’s expected of her. Because of this, she is seen as more equal to men than the other women, but she still doesn’t hold the same level of privilege. Although, at the beginning of her relationship with Nick we see a role reversal with her seemingly dominant, it’s all undone when Nick asserts his dominance by breaking up with her over the phone. Her actions are often disapproved by others and she is portrayed as a lying cheat. This can be seen when Tom says, “They oughtn’t let her run around the country this way.” referring to her family. This shows the beliefs of the time, that women shouldn’t have independence.

Jordan and Daisy both reflect how women were perceived in the 20s. Daisy is seen by others to be happy and perfect, but she is actually trapped by her life. Jordan is the only women with any independence and she is portrayed as a liar and cheat, illustrating Fitzgerald’s views on independent women. Despite the women’s rights movement of the 20s, Fitzgerald’s views are unchanged from traditional views on gender roles and stereotypes, even enforcing them by negatively portraying the only independent woman.

The men in this novel are represented as dominating forces, and how they view the women around them directly reflects Fitzgerald’s attitudes towards gender. Nick and Tom both objectify women without sympathy and use them for their own satisfaction. Nick believes that his is an honest, impartial view, but we can see the irony of this as he often views women all as the same or as objects. We see this at one of Gatsby’s parties, as Benny McClenahan “arrived always with four girls” who are “never quite the same ones in physical person, but they were so identical with one another that it inevitably seemed like they had been there before.” (chapter 4) This observation is an example of Nick being quick to judge all women as the same – unimportant, with not enough personality to bother learning their names. His lack of caring for women’s personalities is also clear when he first meets Myrtle. There is no description of her disposition, only her physical figure; another example of his utter lack of respect towards women. Objectification is common throughout the novel and reflects the attitudes of Fitzgerald, as Nick believes himself to be neutral when instead, he is judging and in turn, oppressing women.

Tom demonstrates an extreme variant of Nick’s views. He objectifies women to such an extent that when Myrtle is doing something he doesn’t like, he sees “Making a short deft movement” (chapter 2) and breaking her nose as inconsequential. He sees Daisy as nothing more than an accessory to show off. He convinced her to marry him by giving her “a string of pearls valued at three hundred and fifty thousand dollars” (chapter 4) displaying how he believes women can be bought, just like any object. While Fitzgerald’s attitudes towards women are conservative, he doesn’t approve of the extremity of Toms actions. The reader is positioned throughout the novel to perceive Tom in a negative light, exposing how Fitzgerald doesn’t agree with the way Tom treats all the women in his life. During the 20s when Fitzgerald wrote The Great Gatsby, his attitudes were not out of the ordinary, although considering the changing role of women, it’s surprising that the character representing an ‘impartial’ view still holds such misogynistic attitudes.

Gender stereotypes and expectations affect each character in the novel, usually in a negative way. Daisy fits into gender stereotypes which creates more expectations and causes her to be an abettor in the oppression of women. As explored earlier, Daisy is the golden girl but because she is seen as perfect, she becomes shallow. One of the ways this is shown to the reader is how she reacts by crying when Gatsby showed her his shirts. When asked why, she responds, “They are such beautiful shirts. It makes me sad because I’ve never seen such-such beautiful shirts before.” (chapter 5) This is not her simply being upset over beauty, this is her realising she made a mistake in marrying Tom as she can’t be with Gatsby and his new money. Gatsby’s wealth is represented by the shirts and the fact that they bring Daisy to tears, illustrates her superficiality and longing for wealth. Although she is an abettor in the oppression, she has moments of understanding of the role she plays. The most memorable moment is when she says, “I hope she’s a fool – that’s the best thing a girl can be in this world, a beautiful little fool” (chapter 1) when talking about her daughter. At this moment it is made clear to the reader that Daisy understands that she’s trapped in this life and that being a fool is the only way to make it tolerable. Fitting into the golden girl stereotype shaped Daisy for the worst, as being expected to be perfect all the time reinforced her shallowness and superficiality, leading her to enforce those same stereotypes and expectations on other women.

Tom fits into an aggressively masculine stereotype which often excuses his unfeeling actions, as that was what was expected of those fitting the label. Tom is consistently shown with a lack of sympathy or affection towards others, especially women who he often doesn’t treat as human. His actions towards Daisy are utterly heartless. Just after their South Seas honeymoon is over, he cheats on her with a maid at the hotel they are staying at, which is just the beginning of his unfaithfulness. While Daisy isn’t happy with his actions, nothing can be done to stop him, as if someone fits into the same masculine stereotype as him, it is often expected that they will be unfaithful at least once. Those that experience this same toxic masculinity are expected to be unfeeling; they don’t have any responsibilities to be a good parent, as that’s what a wife is for. Tom fulfils these expectations. When Daisy wakes up after giving birth Tom is “God knows where” (chapter 1) and in the novel, he is never even seen in the same room as his daughter Pammy. This distance is considered normal and if he cared for his daughter a lot, it may be seen as a weakness as caring for a child has feminine connotations. The expectations that come with the masculine stereotype Tom fits into are damaging as they allow him to get rid of responsibility for his actions. Gender illustrating characters roles in society has had negative results and allowed characters to ignore their duties and, as a result, harm those around them.

By performing a gendered reading on The Great Gatsby, it is elucidated to the reader that gender unintentionally played an immense role in defining the story. As gender isn’t a theme, we can see Fitzgerald’s attitudes on gender as they leak into the way he has portrayed women and the role men play. To a reader in the 20s the function of gender may seem normal, progressive even as Jordan is independent, but in the perspective of a reader in contemporary western society, we can clearly see the backward views Fitzgerald holds and the effects of the gender stereotypes and expectations enforced.

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Daisy In The Great Gatsby

June 3, 2020 by Essay Writer

The great Gatsby paints a frivolous and cynical female picture of the “Jazz Age”. These women almost lose a good sense of moral responsibility. What is presented to the readers is a feminine spirit that advocates money and selfishness world. Daisy is the heroine of the novel, but the author does not have a positive description of her, so she can only outline her image through fragmented pieces. Daisy is the spokesperson of the upper class. Like other girls in the “Jazz era”, she is born in a feminine social dance.

Their traditional values ??and beliefs are obliterated by the materialistic society. They pin their own ideals of life on material interests. Above, they pursue wealth and enjoy themselves. She is the representative of the parasitic upper-class women. She is a rich lady who enjoys her life as her goal. She is shallow and false, loves vanity, is bored, and has nothing to do. She is self-centered in everything, and it is impossible to sacrifice her vested interests for Gatsby.

Five years ago, she married Tom because of her love for money and betrayed Gatsby. In Tom’s material world, she became selfish, hypocritical, and spiritually empty like Tom, and the words of speech were filled with “voices of money.” Five years later, Gatsby came forward with hope and pursued the beautiful love that had never changed in his heart. At this time, Gatsby was only an old lover who was obsessed with her nostalgia for Daisy. Daisy is a beautiful, radiant woman. If she does not go deep into the inner world of Daisy, she should be a poetic woman just by her appearance, as if all the sunshine is concentrated on her, her beauty is enough to touch everything. However, she married a wealthy and bored rich man. Although they come from different social classes and accept different cultural literacy, they all show selfishness, emptiness, and money-oriented character. This is related to the situation of women in the historical era, and reflects the attitude of American society towards women at that time.

Daisy has her own rules of life and personality, but she lives in Gatsby’s illusion. She is beautiful, stupid, selfish, vulgar, and is a trivial little person in the real world. She turned into a wonderful dream of supremacy, a pure symbol that would make him relive the old feelings. She represents the inner essence of the decaying “American Dream”. A false, empty, unrealistic illusion. The author discusses this serious issue through Daisy’s attitude and approach in dealing with the relationship between people. At a grand reception at Gatsby, Daisy took her arrogant husband, Tom Buchanan, to Gatsby’s home. Gatsby introduced to Daisy and Tom the many celebrities who attended the reception, especially the ones who were particularly outstanding during the period:

“Perhaps you know that lady,” Gatsby indicated a gorgeous, scarcely human orchid of a woman who sat in state under a white-plum tree. Tom and Daisy stared, with that peculiarly unreal feeling that accompanies the recognition of a hitherto ghostly celebrity of the movies.

“She’s lovely,” said Daisy.

“The man bending over her is her director.”

From the surface point of view, this is a very elegant picture, just as fascinating as the world famous painting. But in a deeper sense, this picture has no real meaning. The star and her director will never enter the real life except the scenes in the rehearsal. After continuing to introduce other scenes of this cocktail party, the author suddenly pulled the reader’s attention back to the pair of characters, creating a static or snap-like impression for the reader, as if the reader had come to this Behind the white plum tree, I saw another scene behind the screen:

The last thing I remember was standing with Daisy and watching the movie-picture director and his Star. They were still under the white-plum tree and their faces were touching except for a pale, think ray of moonlight between. It occurred to me that he had been very slowly bending towards her all evening to attain this proximity, and even while I watched I saw him stoop one ultimate degree and kiss at her cheek.

“I like her,” said Daisy. “I think she’s lovely.”

But the rest offended her- and it is inarguably, because it wasn’t a gesture but an emotion.

Daisy likes the movie star because she does not have any substantive ideological connotations. She is just a kind of furnishings, a prop, in addition to the image on the screen, she has no practical significance, beauty is just a shape of the body. She has completely escaped from the real environment of human existence and has become a fixed posture. This description is actually the confession of Daisy’s belief in life. Here she declares her attitude towards people’s feelings and the rules they follow. The emptiness and shallowness of the essence of Daisy will inevitably lead to her emotional indifference and moral degradation. Through the shaping of the character of Daisy, Philip has profoundly and powerfully condemned and criticized the spiritual emptiness and character decline of those who are hidden under the beautiful appearance.

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Women problems in The Great Gatsby

June 3, 2020 by Essay Writer

In F. Scott Fitzgerald’s novel The Great Gatsby, he reveals how women were the problem through the story. He shows that the women in the book are disobedient through their weakness in their morals, choosing money over love, and their dependence on men. The novel The Great Gatsby is a sad story about a man named Jay Gatsby and his true love, Daisy Buchanan, who is a married women. The story is told by one of Daisy’s distant cousins named Nick Carraway.

Daisy, a capricious women, isn’t the only unpleasant female in the novel.

The three main women in the book, including Tom’s mistress, myrtle, and Daisy’s friend Jordan, portray poor examples of women. Meanwhile, Tom Buchanan, the husband of Daisy, is the only hated male in the novel. Although Fitzgerald was an amazing writer, he didn’t do so well showing a good light on the females in the The Great Gatsby. The characterizations of Jordan, Daisy, and Myrtle as distasteful humans draws them as problematic in the novel.

Myrtle, introduced as toms immoral mistress, is strongly dependent on men which shows the type of women in Fitzgerald’s writing. Myrtles immorality comes to light in the readers first glimpse of her, as she describes the unhappy marriage between her and her husband. She admits this and says,

“I knew right away I made a mistake. He borrowed somebody’s best suit to get married in, and never even told me about it, and the man came after it one day when he was out. I gave it to him and then I lay down and cried to beat the band all afternoon” (chapter 2, 35).

The way myrtle reacted to the situation shows her as an emotional women who gets angered and saddened over the silliest things. This also proves that Fitzgerald presumes women to have few cares other than material possessions like Myrtle crying because her new husband is poor. Love should be the only thing she needs to focus on since they just got married, not the financial situations of her husband. Proceeding into the novel, myrtle is depicted into a negative light again. She is controlled and locked up into a room by her husband. George Wilson, who is forcing myrtle to move west with him, and wants to get her away from Tom Buchanan grasp.

Myrtle escapes Wilson, and the place she’s trapped, to only enjoy seconds of freedom before getting hit by an oncoming car and dying. Fitzgerald implies that myrtle should have followed Wilson’s commands and to avoid her unfortunate death. Her ending could ultimately teach women to listen to their husbands. The instantaneous death of myrtle shows that women can’t survive by themselves and without the aid of men for more than a few moments. Myrtles different acts helps the reader to see the negative personalities or characterizations carried through the novel.

Jordan baker, a women with a successful career and the potential to determine her future, is supposed to be one of the strongest women of her day, but Fitzgerald turns her into a self-centered brat. While driving with nick, he calls her a rotten driver, but she says, “they’ll keep out of my way, it takes two to make an accident”. Her words indicate that she doesn’t think how her action might affect the people around her. Fitzgerald also shows that women aren’t just self-centered, but potentially a danger to the society with Jordan’s bad driving as proof.

During Jordan and Nick’s last meeting near the end of the novel, Jordan declares she’s gonna marry another man. At first nick thinks she’s lying, but the action remains hateful on both sides. If Jordan is really going to marry another man, she could possibly do it do spite nick. However if Jordan was lying about being engaged to another man, she’d come off as attention seeking and pathetic, because she wants nick to fight for her. In this passage, Fitzgerald clearly engineered Jordan to look like the villain from both sides. Although Jordan has the potential to be a great model for women because she has the freedom to make her own decisions and is able to support herself, she still depicted as a woman who makes terrible decisions.

Daisy Buchanan, the worst portrayed woman in the book shows both traits from Myrtle and Jordan. She has the money over love concern from Myrtle, and the Self-centeredness from Jordan. Daisy’s concern of of money is really shown when she’s deciding between Tom and Gatsby. Early in Daisy’s life, she left Gatsby to be with a more stable income of her now husband, Tom Buchanan. Although, later on daisy sees Gatsby’s wealth through his big party’s at his mansion, and decides that Gatsby is the one she’s loved all along. In this writing, Fitzgerald is implying that women need money more than love. Concurrently, he displays the fickleness of the women in the novel, especially when daisy goes back to Tom after Gatsby takes liability of Myrtle Wilson’s death, which saved daisy but took his own life. By taking responsibility of Myrtle’s death, George Wilson eliminates Gatsby, believing him to have killed Myrtle.

After Gatsby’s death, Daisy isn’t even considerate to show up to the funeral or honor his life in any type of way. Daisy also doesn’t send any flowers or thanks to Gatsby for saving her life as nick states saying, “daisy hadn’t sent a message or a flower”. Daisy is so self-centered that she fails to see that if not for her, Gatsby would still be alive.

Through the novel, Fitzgerald shows that the women in the novel are self-centered, problematic, money hungry, and have no morals. All these things cause the downfall of Jay Gatsby, who only wanted his true love Daisy Buchanan, which sadly ended up having him die.

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The Great Gatsby and Impossible Dreams

June 3, 2020 by Essay Writer

As people, we all have things we desire, sometimes impossible but we don’t care because we want to achieve our goals. We sometimes work hard for our goals even when it seems impossible, or we know when it’s time to quit. While Jay Gatsby has worked hard to achieve his dreams, In The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, the main character, Jay Gatsby, is chasing an impossible dream because everything he has done is to get Daisy Buchanan but he still ends up losing her, Jay Gatsby told too many lies to achieve his dream, and Jay Gatsby’s dreams were unrealistic.

First, Jay Gatsby is chasing an impossible dream because everything he has done was to get Daisy Buchanan, but he still ends up losing her. Jay Gatsby’s dream has always been to be together with Daisy, so he schemed up so many ways to make her his. Gatsby disappeared, got rich, came back into her life, and threw big parties all to impress her.

One of the problems is that Daisy is married to Tom, so there’s a wedge to prevent him from achieving his goal. Gatsby has told to many lies and has a very mysterious backstory. Even with all his fame and his wealth he couldn’t get Daisy to leave Tom for him. , William Voegeli a contributing editor to The Claremont Review of Books, states “No woman of flesh and bone could be worthy of such idealization, and both men turn out to be more in love with love than with their beloved. “In any case, it was just personal,”(Fitzgerald.116) says Gatsby when he tries to take in the knowledge that Daisy never loved him the way he loved her.” This statement from William Voegeli’s article explains that Gatsby had lost something that he never had in the first place. Gatsby is trying to recapture something that wasn’t there in the beginning. I agree with what Voegeli’s statement because throughout the whole novel we see Gatsby stubbornly go after Daisy after he sees there’s no chance of them being together. I believe that it was nothing personal for Daisy not wanting Gatsby because Gatsby had disappeared for a while and she is already married to Tom.

Additionally, Jay Gatsby told too many lies to achieve his dream. Jay Gatsby has told many lies since the beginning of the novel. Gatsby has made up so many different stories on how he came to accumulate his wealth, but in reality, he achieved his fortune illegally, through the use of bootlegging, and with his connections to the mob. There were stories of Gatsby owning several drug stores that were untrue. In the novel The Great Gatsby, it states “I found out what your ‘drug-stores’ were.” (Fitzgerald.7.103) He turned to us and spoke rapidly. “He and this Wolfsheim bought up a lot of side-street drug-stores here and in Chicago and sold grain alcohol over the counter. That’s one of his little stunts. I picked him for a bootlegger the first time I saw him, and I wasn’t far wrong.” (Fitzgerald.7.103) This quote shows Gatsby getting caught in a lie and being called out for being in an illegal business. After he gets caught he doesn’t seem to care about it. Gatsby also lies a lot to Nick Carraway, who happens to be Daisy’s cousin, by using him to get closer to Daisy. This could be proven by the simple fact that Gatsby’s main goal is to get back to Daisy and Nick is the gateway to her. He is always seen as being extremely nice to Nick. He doesn’t actually want a friendship with Nick he just wants a relationship with his once true love. He manipulated Nick just to try to be closer to Daisy. Gatsby makes Nick invite him for tea and he made sure to make Nick invite Daisy. This is another way that Gatsby is manipulating Nick just to get closer to Daisy.

Finally, the most important reason In The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, the main character, Jay Gatsby, is chasing an impossible dream is Jay Gatsby’s dreams were unrealistic. Once again mentioning his desires to be with Daisy and to have his dream was incredibly unrealistic. Gatsby kept convincing himself that the dream was obtainable. “You can’t repeat the past? Why, of course, you can!” (Fitzgerald.6.85). Gatsby was very delusional about this dream. “Oh you want too much,’ she cried to Gatsby. ‘I love you now, isn’t that enough? I can’t help what’s past. I did love him once – but I love you too.”(Fitzgerald.7.102) This quote is Daisy explaining to Gatsby that his dream is so impossible to obtain because he’s asking for too much, this ultimately crushes his dream. Gatsby ultimately drops everything for Daisy and does everything for her just to accomplish his dream, even though Daisy even knows that it’s an impossible dream to attain. We could also see Gatsby’s delusion when he states he felt married to Daisy already. “She vanished into her rich house, into her rich, full life, leaving Gatsby – nothing. He felt married to her, that was all.” (Fitzgerald. 8.149) This quote from the novel is explaining the relationship that Gatsby and Daisy had he left out of his life and into his regular rich life, a life without Gatsby. He’s left with nothing, but he still feels married to her. Another stand out the quote was when Gatsby was standing on the Dock, looking at the light by Daisy’s dock. He reaches out for the green light and then it slowly fades away. This is very symbolic, the green light represents his and Daisy’s relationship. With the evidence provided, we can see that Gatsby was very delusional and wouldn’t give up his dreams.

Indeed, while Jay Gatsby did whatever he could to achieve his dream, In The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, the main character, Jay Gatsby, is chasing an impossible dream. His dream was impossible because everything he has done was to get Daisy and he still lost her, he told too many lies, and his dreams were unrealistic. With all of these reasons, it’s clear to see why Gatsby’s dreams failed and were very impossible to obtain.

Works Cited

  • Fitzgerald, F.Scott. The Great Gatsby. Penguin Books, 1950.
  • Ward, Jesmyn. “Jay Gatsby: A Dreamer Doomed to Be Excluded. The Novelist Jesmyn Ward Explains.” The New York Times, The New York Times, 12 Apr. 2018,
  • Voegeli, William. “Gatsby and the Pursuit of Happiness.” Claremont Institute, William Voegeli, 17 Dec. 2003,
  • www.claremont.org/crb/article/gatsby-and-the-pursuit-of-happiness/.
  • Basu-Zharku, I. (2011). The Great Gatsby’s Relation to and Importance as a Work of Art. [online] Inquiries Journal. Available at: [Accessed 17 May 2019].
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Examples of discrimination in The Great Gatsby

June 3, 2020 by Essay Writer

I have noticed that there are many examples of discrimination and divide between wealth classes in the texts we’ve read this quarter. The Marxist reader does not like the divide and wants the established classes and apparent separation to be abolished. To them it is immoral for materialistic things like money to control others around them or assuming of power due to higher wealth and/or net-worth. When everyone is working mechanical jobs it was not necessarily good for them or the economy as they turn into pencil pushing mindless drones who are unmotivated giving them no real motive to do great things.

The Great Gatsby shows the lavish lifestyles that were to be had if you had money in the twenties. Hills like white elephants showed us that if you follow like a mindless drone then the bourgeoisie culture will essentially swallow them making the ideals and literature for Marxist culture non creative or convincing really at all. In Updike’s A&P Sammy satirizes the capitalist ideals.

Starting off with Gatsby there are many examples of some red flags that would pop up to the Marxist. One of those quotes is “My house looks well, doesn’t it? See how the whole front of it catches the light? – It took me just three years to earn the money that bought it (89-90).” This shows how when money is highly focused on by a proletariat how much it takes over their brain like a parasite. “All I kept thinking about, over and over, was “You can’t live forever; you can’t live forever” (36).

This was said by Myrtle, talking about the affair she was having with a man named Tom and her friends even egged it on saying “you need to get away from him” referring to her husband George, a Marxist could make a claim that not only is there oppression by wealth but also by ideology because Myrtle is the epitome of the roaring 20’s spirit of wealth and freedom to spirit, the latter being a more spiritualized version of capitalism in a way.”He hadn’t once ceased looking at Daisy, and I think he revalued everything in his house according to the measure of response it drew from her well-loved eyes” (91). To Gatsby in the book he never usually cares about his wealth and possessions but whenever Daisy glares at them with her eyes he reevaluates their intrinsic value to him based on the fact that it means more to him because it does to her.

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Women and the American Dream

June 3, 2020 by Essay Writer

Daisy and Myrtle are two women on opposite sides of the social hierarchy. In spite of their differences, both women face similar obstacles that prevent them from living fulfilled lives. Social expectations keep women from achieving their American dreams, forcing them to rely on men who own all of the power in society.

Daisy Buchanon is a woman born with a silver spoon in her mouth. Daisy’s status as an East Egger gives her various opportunities to achieve the American dream.

Daisy marries Tom who grants her stability and a family- this marriage is only possible due to their similar positions in society. Gatsby and many other suitors are attracted to Daisy’s wealth and the fact that she is “dressed in white” (Fitzgerald 74). Ultimately, Daisy chooses a stable future with Tom over Gatsby’s potential for love and wealth- her connection to Gatsby allows Daisy to avoid persecution and continue the stereotypical American dream with Tom.

Although Daisy’s status as an East Egger gives her more agency, Daisy’s pursuance of her true American dream is hampered by her society’s expectations of her class and of women in the 1920’s.

Daisy is hesitant to split with Tom due to her class deeming the West Eggers beneath them as their identity “chafed under the old euphemisms” (Fitzgerald 107). Daisy also may have been unwilling to damage her reputation as the golden girl- leaving her perfect East Egg lifestyle to start a life with the mysterious West Egger may have been too great of a sacrifice for Daisy. Daisy chose Tom over Gatsby as she couldn’t bear to lose what she already had for the potential for happiness; humans are reluctant to risk what they have for the chance of something greater.

Myrtle has as much control over her dream as she does her own death. While Daisy had the fortune to be born an East Egger, Myrtle is stuck at the bottom of the class hierarchy. She has little wealth as someone living in the Valley of Ashes, and her connections are all of the same class as her. Myrtle’s only chance at ascending the class ladder is Tom, who she believes can give her the material life she longs for. Unfortunately for Myrtle, Tom would never damage his East Egger reputation in order to start a life with her- Myrtle is below Daisy to the point where Tom believes she does not “have any right to mention Daisy’s name” (Fitzgerald 37). Without Tom, Myrtle is destined to remain where she is now- the reputation of the Valley extends to her and makes her undesirable to those of a higher class. What makes her unique however is the liveliness that attracts Tom to her.

While Daisy and many other characters seem aimless and in constant limbo, Myrtle is driven and passionate as Nick realizes “there was an immediately perceptible vitality about her” (Fitgerald 25). When Tom appears in her life, she latches on to him and acts as though she has already achieved her dream of becoming wealthy- while Myrtle does act unlikeable in many ways, this drive makes her similar to Gatsby. Both characters have a dream that drives their actions throughout the story- pursing a character who they believe can grant them their American Dream.

A similarity between Myrtle and Daisy is both women turn to men in order to achieve their dreams. When both women the reach the climax in their ability to achieve their dreams, they seek out powerful male figures to get what they desire. Daisy, with all of her class, has to rely on her marriage to Tom, a male East Egger, in order to achieve the modern American dream; Myrtle depended on Wilson to give her the life she wanted, only to end up in a stagnant marriage and “living over that garage for eleven years” (Fitzgerald 35). Even if Myrtle wanted to work in order to ascend the class ladder, the stigma around women in the workforce at the time would prevent her from succeeding. As the 1920s saw the emergence of the new woman, the stigma around them remained in society.

Women are still perceived as trophies for men to covet and are expected to play the “beautiful little fool” (Fitzgerald 17). Even in Gatsby’s eyes, Daisy is seen as a trophy for achieving his American dream of becoming an East Egger. Jordan, who personifies the modern woman, feels the pressure to maintain this image, for fear of failing and inadvertently proving her image as unrealistic and wrong- this pushes her to cheat and lie at her golf games. There is a prominent double standard in what is tolerated for men and women in the Great Gatsby, and the punishments society deems fit for each case.

Tom is an unmistakeable cheater, as there are many cases of him cheating on his wife. In spite of all of the witnesses of his infidelity, he is never reprimanded for his actions, while he turns and acts the part of a victim when Daisy cheats on him with Gatsby. While both characters are morally wrong in their actions, Tom is being hypocritical in his anger. Tom has also resorted to physical violence with Myrtle, only to walk away without penalty after he “broke her nose with his open hand” ( Fitgerald 37). Gatsby also acts questionably when standing outside Daisy’s house at night and tracking her through newspaper clippings, although this behavior is portrayed in a romantic sense, it is problematic. Without discipline or rebuttal for negative actions, those who engage in such behaviors are bound to become more dangerous in the future. Overall the dynamic between men and women during the 1920s was unbalanced and forced women to rely on males in order to achieve their dreams.

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Gender Roles in the Great Gatsby

June 3, 2020 by Essay Writer

Gender Roles

The Great Gatsby paints a frivolous and cynical female picture of the “Jazz Age”. These women almost lose a good sense of moral responsibility. What is presented to the readers is a feminine spirit that advocates money and selfishness world. Daisy is the heroine of the novel, but the author does not have a positive description of her, so she can only outline her image through fragmented pieces. Daisy is the spokesperson of the upper class. Like other girls in the “Jazz era”, she is born in a feminine social dance.

Their traditional values ??and beliefs are obliterated by the materialistic society. They pin their own ideals of life on material interests. Above, they pursue wealth and enjoy themselves. She is the representative of the parasitic upper-class women. She is a rich lady who enjoys her life as her goal. She is shallow and false, loves vanity, is bored, and has nothing to do. She is self-centered in everything, and it is impossible to sacrifice her vested interests for Gatsby.

Five years ago, she married Tom because of her love for money and betrayed Gatsby. In Tom’s material world, she became selfish, hypocritical, and spiritually empty like Tom, and the words of the speech were filled with voices of money. Five years later, Gatsby came forward with hope and pursued the beautiful love that had never changed in his heart. At this time, Gatsby was only an old lover who was obsessed with her nostalgia for Daisy. Daisy is a beautiful, radiant woman. If she does not go deep into the inner world of Daisy, she should be a poetic woman just by her appearance, as if all the sunshine is concentrated on her, her beauty is enough to touch everything. However, she married a wealthy and bored rich man. Although they come from different social classes and accept different cultural literacy, they all show selfishness, emptiness, and money-oriented character. This is related to the situation of women in the historical era and reflects the attitude of American society towards women at that time.

Daisy has her own rules of life and personality, but she lives in Gatsby’s illusion. She is beautiful, stupid, selfish, vulgar, and is a trivial little person in the real world. She turned into a wonderful dream of supremacy, a pure symbol that would make him relive the old feelings. She represents the inner essence of the decaying “American Dream”. A false, empty, unrealistic illusion. The author discusses this serious issue through Daisy’s attitude and approach in dealing with the relationship between people. At a grand reception at Gatsby, Daisy took her arrogant husband, Tom Buchanan, to Gatsby’s home. Gatsby introduced to Daisy and Tom the many celebrities who attended the reception, especially the ones who were particularly outstanding during the period:

“Perhaps you know that lady.” Gatsby indicated a gorgeous, scarcely human orchid of a woman who sat in state under a white-plum tree. Tom and Daisy stared, with that peculiarly unreal feeling that accompanies the recognition of a hitherto ghostly celebrity of the movies.

“She’s lovely,” said Daisy.

“The man bending over her is her director”(Fitzgerald 104-105).

From the surface point of view, this is a very elegant picture, just as fascinating as the world famous painting. But in a deeper sense, this picture has no real meaning. The star and her director will never enter real life except for the scenes in the rehearsal. After continuing to introduce other scenes of this cocktail party, the author suddenly pulled the reader’s attention back to the pair of characters, creating a static or snap-like impression for the reader, as if the reader had come to this. Behind the white plum tree, I saw another scene behind the screen:

The last thing I remember was standing with Daisy and watching the movie-picture director and his Star. They were still under the white-plum tree and their faces were touching except for a pale, think ray of moonlight between. It occurred to me that he had been very slowly bending towards her all evening to attain this proximity, and even while I watched I saw him stoop one ultimate degree and kiss at her cheek.

“I like her,” said Daisy. “I think she’s lovely.”

But the rest offended her—and it is inarguably, because it wasn’t a gesture but an emotion (Fitzgerald 107).

Daisy likes the movie star because she does not have any substantive ideological connotations. She is just a kind of furnishings, a prop, in addition to the image on the screen, she has no practical significance, beauty is just a shape of the body. She has completely escaped from the real environment of human existence and has become a fixed posture. This description is actually the confession of Daisy’s belief in life. Here she declares her attitude towards people’s feelings and the rules they follow. The emptiness and shallowness of the essence of Daisy will inevitably lead to her emotional indifference and moral degradation. Through the shaping of the character of Daisy, Philip has profoundly and powerfully condemned and criticized the spiritual emptiness and character decline of those who are hidden under the beautiful appearance.

Another major female role in the novel is the unmarried woman Jordan Becker, who is a good friend of Daisy and has the same personality qualities as the upper class women of Daisy. She is selfish and has no sense of responsibility and has the same monetary values ??as Tom and Daisy. She loves to lie, dishonesty, and cheat in the golf championship game because “she wasn’t able to endure being at a disadvantage…”(Fitzgerald 58) She was a liar, she was seen cheating in a golf game, but she managed to escape the scandal by bribery or repression. Nick said, “she was incurably dishonest” (Fitzgerald 58). Because he saw in Jordan the irresponsible nature of Daisy, only the nature of extraction. In the social environment of the time, Jordan had a certain sense of independence but undoubtedly influenced by the materialism and individualism in that era, showing a strong individualistic tendency to become selfish, indifferent and cynical. It was because of her selfishness and indifference that she did not get the love of Nick.

The third major female character in the novel is Myrtle Wilson. She is portrayed as a lower-level figure who is vain, frivolous, and arty. Her husband, George Wilson, was a lower-level worker who repaired the car in the Valley of the Ashes, and Martel looked down on her husband. She is hypocritical and loves the limelight. For example, at a party, she tries to show her “impressive hauteur”, her laughter, her posture, her speech, every moment becomes more and more artificial, and later, “she seemed to be revolving on a noisy, creaking pivot through the smoky air” (Fitzgerald 31). In a short period, she changed three skirts and said that she would buy another one the next day. She envied the money and status of Tom Buchanan and confessed to him. She pretended to be funny and learned the tone of the upper class to reprimand the waiters in the hotel. She is hypocritical, advocating money, and wants to squeeze into the upper class; but when she argues with Tom and mentions the name of Daisy, she is broken by Tom’s slap, blood flow, obviously in a pathetic and sad status. The tragic ending that she was finally driven to death by Daisy undoubtedly represented the tragedy of this kind of women in the jazz era at the bottom of society.

The significance of Daisy in the whole story is that she is not the perfect object that Gatsby portrays and desperately pursues in his dream world, but a wonderful representative in the “Jazz Age”, a secular society. The avatar of the typical essence. She is also a loser in love and marriage. Her failure is closely related to Gatsby’s more painful social failure.

In short, the re-exploration of the above female characters has practical significance for today’s society. Modern women must strive for equality with men, and should be self-respecting, self-reliant, and achieve independence in the true sense.

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"The Great Gatsby" and "Call Me by Your Name"

June 3, 2020 by Essay Writer

The prevalence of infatuation as a thematic concern in Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby” and Aciman’s “Call Me by Your Name” is beyond all doubt. Be it the religious idolatry of another within Call Me by Your Name or the illusion of love which fuels desire within The Great Gatsby, what we may take for certain, in both novels is that what infatuation fuels is something forbidden with regard to both contexts. Gatsby’s desire is fuelled by the forbidden nature of Daisy, a married woman now, with which his affair would’ve been scandalous within American society in the 1920s the desire of Gatsby’s love is shown through their separation and his obsession with the “green light” expressing the inability to achieve his American dream Daisy.

Where-as, in Call Me By Your Name Aciman presents forbidden love through the nature of a same-sex relationship set in Italy in the 1980s where same-sex marriages would only become legal in 2016, the obsession is presented through the worship of Oliver who is represented a “moment in heaven” for Elio, highlighting the inability to disregard obsession as a catalytic force.

Nonetheless, obsession is the fuel for both relationships within The Great Gatsby and Call Me by Your Name, with which the relationships are dependent upon for them to exist

Within The Great Gatsby Fitzgerald presents Gatsby’s infatuation through his dependence on the “green light” which symbolizes his desire of love for Daisy – a symbol of the “ideal he has created”. The “green light” hangs at the end of Daisy’s dock, and Gatsby bought his house in order to be able to see it each night, the green light most obviously symbolizes his unwavering love for Daisy. After Gatsby revealed his knowledge of the significance of the “green light” to Daisy after their reunion it could be regarded the “the colossal significance of that light had now vanished forever”. Daisy’s unawareness to the light suggests that the light was only a symbol of what could’ve been and provided Gatsby with a reminder of their existence together in one world a possibility for them to be connected. But, now the symbol of the “green light” is more important to Gatsby than Daisy herself as she “could ever approximate the platonic ideal he has invented” (Pearson) but also now the significance which the light withholds represents more than love, almost an unquestionable devotion and worship to a source which could never be fulfilled by Daisy with which he will continually struggle to reconcile with this dream throughout. The use of the colour “green” is also significant of Fitzgerald as it could symbolize money to the reader, therefore the “green light” symbolizes the wealth Gatsby feels he needs to attain to be able to win Daisy back from Tom, however, Fitzgerald makes Gatsby completely unaware to the clear distinction between wealth and class within the 20th century, as even though he has been able to make his own money he will always represent the class of new money whereas Tom and Daisy represent that of old money something which Gatsby can never achieve and will always be shut out of the upper classes by those who were born into wealth. Whilst the green light is symbolized with wealth and money, Daisy is often referred to being gold or silver by Fitzgerald, as she is seen as being the “golden girl” and seen as “gleaming like silver” expressing a more safe, enduring and strong source of wealth than that of Gatsby’s, as the money of Gatsby is represented by the green light which resembles his desire to do anything to achieve it whereas the inherited money of Daisy and Tom is out of reach. Furthermore, as well as the green light representing of new and old money Fitzgerald may have used it to symbolize the American Dream – the idea that people from a lower-class background can move up the social class ladder by working hard. Throughout the novel, Fitzgerald focuses on the idea whether the promise of the American dream is a reality, for Gatsby it is rather unfulfilling even though he has moved from lower-class background to the highest class in New York on his own accord. However, Fitzgerald within The Great Gatsby presents Gatsby as representative of the hollowness of the American Dream as he is still unable to achieve his goal of Daisy, which here we could suggest that the green light offers Gatsby a suitably inaccessible focus for his yearning (Tanner) – highlighting the green light as the ideal representative ideal of having Daisy and provides him with almost an alternate universe where this fantasy does actually exist. Within the novel, Gatsby is continually mocked by Tom Bucanan for his lower-class beginnings calling him a common swindler who’d have to steal the ring he put on (Daisy’s) finger implying that the American Dream can never be fulfilling to Gatsby or fit the ideal he has created as there is a sense of forbidden love between those who are of new money and those of old money, expressing those of the new money or lower class backgrounds will never be accepted by those of old money such as Daisy and Tom, and that the chances these two classes can mix is just an allusion, similarly to Gatsby’s allusion of who Daisy is. However, Gatsby’s infatuation with the green light can be seen as highly unattainable through the car crash, whereas a result the lower-class characters die whereas the upper-class characters survive. The upper-class characters as able to stay immune from the consequences of their actions, Fitzgerald may be trying to suggest that although those from the lower class are able to rise they will be pawns to the upper class who will continuously assert their dominance and power of those of the lower class. Furthermore, Fitzgerald states Gatsby believes in the green light, the orgastic future that year by year recedes us expressing the American dream is not a reality is just a dream of an ideal situation, but also expressing Gatsby’s infatuation for Daisy can never be achieved as she recedes before him, whilst he is wanting to become the person he thinks she will want him to become he is only pushing her away as she is just an image of the platonic ideal he has created. The reality of Gatsby’s American Dream of Daisy is that he isn’t in love with her as much as he was in love with the idea of her and the green light symbolizes this ideal, his infatuation is just a “focus for his yearning” (Tanner) of Daisy.

Furthermore, within Call Me By Your Name Aciman presents Elio’s infatuation through his longing desire for continuous physical intimacy with Oliver becoming infatuated by every part of him, similarly to The Great Gatsby Elio is reliant upon on idea of what he imagines Oliver is similarly to Gatsby’s ideal of Daisy. Aciman presents Elio’s infatuation through his admiration of Oliver, whom his continuously observes. Elio becomes obsessed with the Star of David around Oliver neck, Aciman present the confidence it brings to Oliver and it represents his Jewish identity which is “timeless, ancestral, immortal” a sense of belonging which Elio could be envious for what Oliver is experiencing and what he may have been able to achieve through his Jewish identity, Oliver is “ok” with accepting his Jewish heritage whereas Elio isn’t he admires this strength of Oliver and the individuality of him sparks his infatuation further. Elio however, unlike Oliver is taught to be a Jew of discretion by his mother – not showing their Jewish identity but also not hiding it, similarly to Elio’s feelings for Oliver as they must be repressed to suit the expectations of the time. Elio is shocked with Oliver okay with being Jewish as he lets his Star of David hang loose from his t shirt and whilst Oliver is accepting of his religious identity this sparks admiration and only furthers his infatuation as “he was okay with being himself” the self-confidence which Oliver has is such a shock to Elio because he cannot accept either his religious identity or his own sexual identity. His infatuation strives from Oliver being “okay” with everything, a source of an ideal he has created almost Gatsby but rather than wanting Oliver as a lover his infatuation almost suggest he wants to be Oliver. Therefore, the Star of David and Elio’s and Oliver’s shared beliefs in Judaism could be an analogy for their shared ambiguous sexuality. The symbol of the Star of David is also significant to Aciman’s own Jewish background, as he grew up a religious minority in Egypt, a central theme to his biographical work, Out of Egypt. Furthermore, within Call Me by Your Name Aciman further uses religious imagery to express Elio’s idolatry for Oliver – which can also be seen through Gatsby’s ideal of what Daisy is and him worshipping this false sense of an ideal he has created in order to fulfill the void of her within his life. Elio worship’s Oliver continually throughout the novel as he is completely infatuated by him his body, his personality and the way he acts- as Elio wishes to have touched, caressed, worshipped that scrape expressing to the reader that Elio’s infatuation stems from Oliver’s body which his ultimate reason and hope in life. Timothy Keller remarks idolatry happens when we take good things and make them ultimate things which can link to Elio’s presentation and obsession with Oliver as he becomes his ultimate thing as he is “heaven” a source of almost God-like perfection to which Oliver has become Elio’s God whom he idolizes and gives him a sense of purpose something which he never thought he’d be worthy of or able to achieve. But also, the idea of relating Oliver of a God could express the idea that he is the provider of a home, unconditional love, and safety. Also significant is the relationship between Elio and Oliver which is created by Aciman as they are in a homosexual relationship that would have been forbidden in Italy during the 1980s and only became legal in 2016. But also, the use of a gay relationship within a highly Catholic Country would’ve have also proved significant as it is ironic as Oliver is presented as Elio’s “God” figure. This sense of a forbidden relationship can also be represented within The Great Gatsby as Daisy is a married woman and Gatsby’s love for her would be considered as unacceptable during the 1920s, but also it could be considered as forbidden due to times limitations upon their relationship.

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