Heracles Hercules Furens

Difference in Hercules and Spiderman

August 26, 2020 by Essay Writer

In many Greek hero myths and stories, protagonists are presented with a series of hardships or task they must past. In the book Mythology by Edith Hamilton Hercules tries to achieve atonement. He brainlessly accepts all the challenges that Eurystheus gave him, while Spiderman thinks thoroughly before he performs his actions.

The tradition of achieving atonement has deteriorated away from modern culture myths. In the book Spiderman the hero of Stan Lee’s novels, Spiderman tries to achieve security and stability for his community.

Hercules is driven to serve the society because of his guilt while Spiderman serves the society willingly, which shows the difference between the Greek and modern idea about serving the society. The guilt that drives Hercules and the effort to make the society a better place drives Spiderman, shows that the idea of atonement has faded away in modern myths.

Greek heroes such as Hercules show heroism that is not displayed in modern day myths. Heroes such as Hercules do many things without thinking such as, encountering many creatures and performing tasks they would have never thought possible.

For example, as Hercules tries to achieve atonement for the horrible acts that he has committed against his family and he must complete twelve tasks, one of which involves going down into the underworld: “His task was to bring Cerberus, the three-headed dog, up from Hades” (Hamilton 174). This task requires a lot of strength and courage as mentioned by Hamilton, “He lifted him and carried him all the way up to earth and on to Mycenae” (Hamilton 174).

Without Hercules this task could not be accomplished by anyone. All twelve of the tasks that Hercules was to perform didn’t not require much intelligence or cleverness, just strength. In many Greek myths there are no brains involved in the deed or action executed, just senseless killing and other tests of strength. On the other hand Spiderman performs his heroic acts with not only with his strength but also with intelligence. By using intelligence Spiderman has a much better chance of accomplishing his duty. For example, while the Green Goblin tied up Spiderman he was, “…to quickly think how to escape” (Lee 87). Greek myths have evolved form heroes performing actions brainlessly to heroes performing action with intellectual aid.

Many Greek heroes perform lawful acts for their community that modern day heroes do not perform. Many Greek heroes serve their community because they want to achieve atonement for the acts that they have performed. In the case of Hercules, “…a wrong who has sent the madness upon him” (Hamilton 169). Hercules had gone mad after his wife, Megara has borne him three sons, “He killed his children and Megara, too, as she tried to protect the youngest (Hamilton 169). As the story continues to go on Hercules lives the rest of his life wanting to avenge his own life for the awful act that he has committed. As Hercules rushes out to kill himself his friend Theseus stood before him telling him why he shouldn’t kill himself: “Even so, suffer and be strong,” (Hamilton 170).

Theseus is implying that that Hercules should be strong and wait for death because, “… he rejected the idea that a man could be guilty of a murder when he had not known what he was doing” (Hamilton 170). And so Hercules went on to his cousin Eurystheus and there his cousin gave him twelve tasks that he must perform in order to achieve death. As Hercules performs this action, he almost accomplishes them with ease and after finishing all of the tasks no death had been brought upon him so he brought death upon himself, and therefore avenged his actions against his family.

In the case of Spiderman, he serves his community in order to have a safe and secure community for himself and for the city. Spiderman willingly risks his life to keep the community in which he lives a safe place. Clearly myths and stories have evolved from serving the community in order to achieve eternal piece to thinking about others and performing deeds for others.

In conclusion, Hercules and Spiderman have many differences but their biggest difference is that Hercules performs his duties and heroic acts brainlessly, while Spiderman performs his heroic duties with intelligence and strategy. Our modern day myths no longer have the idea of atonement instead, the heroes serve their community willingly. This is what makes a hero a true hero.

Read more

Male Identity and Greek Mythology’s Hercules in Films

August 26, 2020 by Essay Writer

Famed for his mighty muscles, Hercules was the son of the mortal woman Alcmene and the god Zeus. Hercules performed many legendary feats of strength, the first of which came as an infant: when Zeus’s wife Hera placed two serpents in his crib, Hercules quickly strangled them. After he had grown to manhood Hera got revenge by driving Hercules briefly mad, causing him to slay his own wife and children. As penance Hercules performed his famous 12 labors (or tasks), which included killing the Hydra, capturing Cerberus the dog, and cleaning the stables of Augeas.

Hercules appears in many ancient Greek stories and is one of mythology’s best-known heroes. Mythologies are fantasies that have the power to endure in people’s minds and culture through time. For this, mythological stories and characters have been part of substantial themes of films in the history of filmmaking. They have a significant place in the world of filmmaking because mythological stories and characters have the ample amount of mystery and magic that has the ability to capture the audience’s attention and imagination.

Storylines may differ or be similar to the myths itself but the essence of the mythological character exudes.

One such masculine and mythological character is the half-man half-god Greek hero, Hercules. This mythological character with extraordinary physical strength has been featured and appeared in numerous films in the big screen and television. With the different depictions of Hercules, this paper then is an assessment on how he was portrayed and presented in films. The materials considered for this study were Disney’s animated film “Hercules” released on 1997 and Roger Young’s miniseries entitled “Hercules. Half Man. Half God. All Power. ” released on 2004 by the Hallmark Channel.

Hercules on Disney’s Animated Film According to the Big Cartoon Database (n. d. ) “Hercules” was a “Disney update on classic mythology”, an animated film about his journey towards finding a place where he belonged. Here, Hercules, the son of Greek gods Zeus and Hera was born god-like strength in Olympus, the home of the gods. When Hades, the God of the Underworld, learns that his plan of domination in the future will be affected because of Hercules’ existence, he summons his two followers, Pain and Panic, de-immortalize the child Hercules and kill him in the mortal world.

Pain and Panic, failed in their mission and only succeeds in making Hercules mortal. No mortal beings are allowed to dwell in Olympus, which leaves Hercules in the care of Alcmene and Amphitryon, the childless mortal couple who found him on the bushes. Hercules later grows into a misfit adolescent because of his extraordinary strength that always gets him in the center of chaos. His adoptive parents later tells him of his past and a medal found with him that is a link to Zeus, his father. Hercules then journeys to the temple of the gods.

Zeus appears and confirms Hercules thoughts. Zeus tells him that the only way that Hercules can enter Olympus again is that if he becomes an earthly hero to gain his godliness. The adolescent Hercules then goes on a pursuit of a hero status with the help and instructions from the satyr, Philoctetes. He achieves the hero status later in adulthood but is perplexed because he still is not a god. When Hades learns that Hercules still lives, he orders his soul-bound follower Megara to deceive Hercules.

Hades tries to block his path to being a God with calamities and creatures like the multi-headed, Hydra. Hercules becomes a God when he sacrifices himself for Megara. The animated film ends with Hercules choosing to stay in the mortal world to be with Megara. The most obvious difference of the animated film from the original Greek myth of Hercules is that the dreadful factors of his origins were revised and some components of modern day popular culture were utilized. According to Royalty. nu (n. d. ), Hercules was born to Alcmene, wife of Amphityron, but fathered by the Greek God Zeus.

Zeus deceived Alcmene into thinking that he was Amphitryon on a night when the real Amphitryon was away. Hera, Zeus’ wife loathed Hercules and tried several times to try and kill Hercules, much unlike in the animated film, where Hera as Hercules’ mother doted on him. The animated film focused on Hercules’ early life; the famous ten labors of Hercules and the other half of his life was not included. The circumstances of the Greek myth characters like Megara, Zeus, Hera, Aphitryon, Alcmene and the rest included in the film were greatly modified to fit the storyline of the animated film.

Apart from that Hercules’ twin brother, Iphicles was excluded in the storyline. Greek mythology portrays Hercules as a character with “low intelligence and terrible temper”(Royalty. nu, n. d. ). Although there was much difference from the original Greek myth, Hercules’ character as half-man half-god hero with weaknesses was still portrayed. Hercules’ character in the animated film was a bit naive but he was not quick to loose his temper. Audiences were also given a taste of Hercules’ famous battles with calamities and creatures.

Hercules on Roger Young’s Miniseries According to FilmAffinity (n. d. ), this Hercules miniseries is about “the gifted child born of a blood greater than mortal who would become the most powerful of all gods”. Roger Young’s miniseries starts with how Hercules was conceived. Similar to the Greek myth, the dissolute God Zeus deludes the Princess of Thebes, Alcmene, into thinking that he is the princess’ husband, Amphitryon, and then forces himself on Alcmene on a night where the princess was awaiting her husband’s return.

When Alcmene gives birth to twin boys, Hercules and Iphicles, Alcmene and Amphitryon are perplexed on which baby is fathered by Zeus and whose is Amphitryon. They later realize that Hercules is Zeus’ son when he kills the snakes with his bare hands an infant. Hercules develops into a lumbering young man, “rejected by his mother, envied by his brother Iphicles and loathed by Zeus’ wife Hera” (FilmAffinity). Similar to the Greek myth while Alcmene reserves no love for Hercules, he grows up with Amphitryon doting on him and teaching him. Hercules then falls for Megara but was rejected.

Their brief connection results to a child. When he lost his temper and accidentally hurt his teacher Linus during a class, Amphitryon sends far away to be taught under the care and instruction of a centaur, Kiron. Hercules becomes an agile adult and more capable to handle his great strength. He then was married to Megara after he helps the king from the creature Hydra. Megara and her sons, turn out to be “tools of the vengeful Hera, plotting against him and initiating events that lead to his banishment from his people” (FilmAffinity).

To atone the punishment that he deserved in killing his own children, Hercules agrees when he was given difficult challenges which were set out to destroy him. With his ally Linus, he travels the Stymphalian Swams to the River styx of the underworld, faced with challenges and monstrous creatures that was arranged to kill him. Hercules willingly continues on this journey that afterward made him a “legend on Earth and achieve immortality in the heavens” (FilmAffinity). With the storyline of the miniseries, it was clear that the filmmakers focused on the raging politics between the noble mortals and their want of power and control.

It is important to note that this miniseries was one of the few productions that embarked on Hercules true conception with regards to the original Greek myth. Hercules’ character of recklessness and short temper was portrayed true to the original Greek myth during his younger adult days. There were slight alterations unto how certain events happened to the characters but the miniseries was in a way loyal to the Hercules’ myth. For example, Hercules develops a more profound thinking later on the miniseries but there was no hint of that according to the Greek Myth.

The Gods Hera and Zeus were not given much attention during the miniseries and only appeared briefly. The supposed raging battle between Hera and Zeus was implied but not shown comprehensively. Conclusion In conclusion, both films were individual depictions of Hercules’ character as the legendary Greek hero. He is a paragon of action and masculinity, and thus embodies characteristics such as great strength, great courage, and great appetites, including erotic adventures with both women and boys or young men.

These qualities did not prevent him from being regarded as a playful figure that used games to relax from his labors and played a great deal with children. Aelian, while he was a champion and a great warrior, he was not above cheating and using any unfair trick to his advantage. However, he was renowned as having “made the world safe for mankind” by destroying many dangerous monsters, and he was also held up as an example for never having attacked first, but for having conquered all merely by defending himself when attacked, and protecting the helpless and distraught.

His self-sacrifice obtained him the ascent to the Olympian realms and he was welcomed by the gods. He represents a balanced, complete energetic principle of the masculine, partaking of both light and dark influences. Historically, the strong American presence in post-war Italy is evident in the very physical presence of Steve Reeves as Hercules. Moreover, the film’s masculinization of revenge also seems to reflect the ideals of post-war society. Instead, as the character of Hercules suggests, it is more important for the wandering male, and also the foreign influence, to be incorporated into the domestic sphere.

Hercules preserves the morality at the centre of the family. Paradoxically, however the interference of Hercules also ensures continued dependence on foreign influence and protection. Each film represented the filmmakers approach on representing a storyline associated with Hercules’ myth. Disney may have chosen to emphasize more on Hercules’ journey to his fate in a more conducive way that was appealing since their audiences are young people. Roger Young’s miniseries took more of a similar likeness to the original myth although alterations were made on how events were played because the storyline demanded that it be so.

Works Cited FilmAffinity. Hercules (TV). FilmAffinity – MovieAffinity. Retrieved November 2, 2006 from http://www. filmaffinity. com/en/film260353. html The Big Cartoon Database. Hercules Story Details. The Big Cartoon Database. Retrieved November 2, 2006 from http://www. bcdb. com/cartoon_synopsis/6-Hercules. html Royalty. nu. Hercules, Young Hercules. The Gordon Knot Webring. Retrieved November 2, 2006 from http://www. royalty. nu/legends/Hercules. html

Read more

Greek Mythology and Hercules

August 26, 2020 by Essay Writer

In Disney’s animated variation of the timeless folklore story, Hercules, they depict Hercules as a soft, klutzy, heroic superhuman. According to the traditional Greek mythology story, Hercules conserves peoples deals with his bravery and strength. Murder, catastrophe, and bloody battles spread throughout the pages of Greek mythologies. It is apparent that the Disney version of the Hercules myth is not a proper one. Understood for entertaining young movie-goers, Disney can not supply an absolutely precise representation of the real Hercules’s adventures, nor of Greek and Roman Folklore.

Resemblances and differences occur between the film and the misconception and takes place in the birth, life and death of Hercules. One of the lots of mistakes in Disney’s Hercules is Hercules’s training. In the Disney motion picture, Zeus and Hera, the parents of Hercules, reign as king and queen of the Gods. Disney represents Hera as Hercules mom, however, this is not true. He ends up being a demigod when Discomfort and Panic try to eliminate him with a potion however Hercules does not consume the last drop.

Hercules grows up on Earth as a mortal with his mortal parents.

In the folklore variation, Hera, the wife of Zeus, dislikes Hercules, an outcome of Zeus sleeping with Amphitryon’s spouse, Alcmene. Born from a mortal mother, for that reason, makes Hercules a demigod. Hercules reminds Hera of her hubby’s unfaithfulness and even presumes regarding send snakes to kill Hercules. This misconception of affairs and vengeance would appeal more to an older audience. Another mistake in Disney’s Hercules appears when Hercules concerns his strength and discovers it difficult to suit.

As a naughty teenager, he always causes havoc any place he goes. In order for Hercules to join his moms and dads on Mt. Olympus, he needs to gain his godhood by becoming a hero. Hercules goes to see Philoctetes, a fitness instructor of heroes, who refuses to train him up until Zeus strikes him with his lightning bolt. In the folklore version, by the time Hercules turns seventeen, he solitarily eliminates a lion scaring the land near Thebes. He hones his battle skills with his adopted daddy and other aides.

Later, Hera sends Hercules into a fit of rage and he kills children. Feeling the need to make amends, Hercules sets out to perform a number of tasks given to him as punishment where he uses his strength. Lastly, in Disney’s Hercules, Pegasus, a winged horse materializes from the clouds. Zeus and Hera gives the playful side kick to Hercules as a gift at birth. Pegasus acts as a true and helpful friend to Hercules throughout the movie. He takes his best friend with him on his many adventures.

One of the best known mythological creatures in Greek mythology is Pegasus and often depicted in books, movies and video games. In mythology, Pegasus was born from the evil blood of Medusa when Perseus decapitates her. A a matter of fact, Hercules never comes across Pegasus in Greek mythology. Disney’s version of Hercules has many errors in comparison to the mythology version but also includes many similarities. One similarity in the movie and the myth reveals the strength of Hercules.

Many notice his power and muscle very early in his life when he strangles the snakes as an infant. This episode takes place in the Disney movie as well in the classic mythology. This exhibits the first sign of Hercules’s amazing superhuman strength. In Greek mythology, Hercules performs some of the most difficult labors from killing the nine-headed Hydra to trapping a boar and saves peoples’ lives across the land. By the end of his twelve labors, Hercules becomes a true hero in the eyes of the Greeks.

His remarkable strength and heroic qualities allows him to become a famous character in classic Roman and Greek mythology. Overall, this animated Disney film makes for enjoyable family entertainment, however, the writers did not do justice to Hercules. If Disney would have made the movie serious or true to the mythology stories, however, it would not appeal to young movie-goers. This could result in a decrease in Disney revenue. Disney tries to make touching and exciting movies for kids and making this movie with such graphic scenes would be out of their realm of entertainment.

Read more

Hercules on Roger Young’s Miniseries

August 26, 2020 by Essay Writer

The most obvious difference of the animated film from the original Greek myth of Hercules is that the dreadful factors of his origins were revised and some components of modern day popular culture were utilized. According to Royalty. nu (n. d. ), Hercules was born to Alcmene, wife of Amphityron, but fathered by the Greek God Zeus. Zeus deceived Alcmene into thinking that he was Amphitryon on a night when the real Amphitryon was away. Hera, Zeus’ wife loathed Hercules and tried several times to try and kill Hercules, much unlike in the animated film, where Hera as Hercules’ mother doted on him.

The animated film focused on Hercules’ early life; the famous ten labors of Hercules and the other half of his life was not included. The circumstances of the Greek myth characters like Megara, Zeus, Hera, Aphitryon, Alcmene and the rest included in the film were greatly modified to fit the storyline of the animated film. Apart from that Hercules’ twin brother, Iphicles was excluded in the storyline.

Greek mythology portrays Hercules as a character with “low intelligence and terrible temper”(Royalty. nu, n. d. ).

Although there was much difference from the original Greek myth, Hercules’ character as half-man half-god hero with weaknesses was still portrayed. Hercules’ character in the animated film was a bit naive but he was not quick to loose his temper. Audiences were also given a taste of Hercules’ famous battles with calamities and creatures. According to FilmAffinity (n. d. ), this Hercules miniseries is about “the gifted child born of a blood greater than mortal who would become the most powerful of all gods”.

Roger Young’s miniseries starts with how Hercules was conceived. Similar to the Greek myth, the dissolute God Zeus deludes the Princess of Thebes, Alcmene, into thinking that he is the princess’ husband, Amphitryon, and then forces himself on Alcmene on a night where the princess was awaiting her husband’s return. When Alcmene gives birth to twin boys, Hercules and Iphicles, Alcmene and Amphitryon are perplexed on which baby is fathered by Zeus and whose is Amphitryon. They later realize that Hercules is Zeus’ son when he kills the snakes with his bare hands an infant.

Hercules develops into a lumbering young man, “rejected by his mother, envied by his brother Iphicles and loathed by Zeus’ wife Hera” (FilmAffinity). Similar to the Greek myth while Alcmene reserves no love for Hercules, he grows up with Amphitryon doting on him and teaching him. Hercules then falls for Megara but was rejected. Their brief connection results to a child. When he lost his temper and accidentally hurt his teacher Linus during a class, Amphitryon sends far away to be taught under the care and instruction of a centaur, Kiron. Hercules becomes an agile adult and more capable to handle his great strength.

He then was married to Megara after he helps the king from the creature Hydra. Megara and her sons, turn out to be “tools of the vengeful Hera, plotting against him and initiating events that lead to his banishment from his people” (FilmAffinity). To atone the punishment that he deserved in killing his own children, Hercules agrees when he was given difficult challenges which were set out to destroy him. With his ally Linus, he travels the Stymphalian Swams to the River styx of the underworld, faced with challenges and monstrous creatures that was arranged to kill him.

Hercules willingly continues on this journey that afterward made him a “legend on Earth and achieve immortality in the heavens” (FilmAffinity). With the storyline of the miniseries, it was clear that the filmmakers focused on the raging politics between the noble mortals and their want of power and control. It is important to note that this miniseries was one of the few productions that embarked on Hercules true conception with regards to the original Greek myth. Hercules’ character of recklessness and short temper was portrayed true to the original Greek myth during his younger adult days.

There were slight alterations unto how certain events happened to the characters but the miniseries was in a way loyal to the Hercules’ myth. For example, Hercules develops a more profound thinking later on the miniseries but there was no hint of that according to the Greek Myth. The Gods Hera and Zeus were not given much attention during the miniseries and only appeared briefly. The supposed raging battle between Hera and Zeus was implied but not shown comprehensively.

In conclusion, both films were individual depictions of Hercules’ character as the legendary Greek hero. Each film represented the filmmakers approach on representing a storyline associated with Hercules’ myth. Disney may have chosen to emphasize more on Hercules’ journey to his fate in a more conducive way that was appealing since their audiences are young people. Roger Young’s miniseries took more of a similar likeness to the original myth although alterations were made on how events were played because the storyline demanded that it be so.

Read more

Heracles: A Tragic Hero in Constant Struggle

May 7, 2019 by Essay Writer

Heracles, Greece’s greatest hero, is a demigod whose mortal life is dominated by a series of successes due to his tremendous strength and failures due to his excessive passions. While, ostensibly, his passions cause him pain and bring about misfortune, he ultimately gains eternal glory through the hardships he endures. Through images of unnecessary conflict and violence, Heracles is directly and indirectly characterized as tragically flawed by a lack of self-control, indicating the necessity of proper judgment and intelligence to offset brute force.

Heracles’s just inclination to self-inflict punishments in contrition for his avoidable misdeeds ironically becomes one of his greatest sources of suffering and thus one of his greatest sources of fame. Though “without his consent he could not have been punished by anyone” (227), he shows a “greatness of soul” (227) by always going above and beyond to make up for his wrongdoings. Unfortunately, this would often result in his punishing “himself when others were inclined to exonerate him” (227), subjecting himself to extremes no other human could withstand. For example, in order to purify himself for killing his “children and Megara” (229), he completes “the Labors of [Heracles]” (232), a series of daunting tasks which include feats like killing “the lion of Nemea” (232), driving away the “Stymphalian birds” (233), and bringing “Cerberus, the three headed dog, up from Hades” (234). Furthermore, in his regret for disrespecting his friend Admetus’s house during a time of mourning, he heaps “blame upon himself” (241) and resolves to wrestle Death and “bring Alcestis back from the dead” (241). Though he is successful in all his tasks, he is never truly “tranquil and at ease” (236), meaning that the suffering he endures is futile to healing his emotional state. Heracles, the ideal Greek who is depicted as sternly devoted to repentance to the point of self-detriment, highlights the importance Greek culture places on proper reconciliation for one’s actions, no matter one’s status in life.

Heracles’s great power, giving him the guise of invincibility, overshadows his vulnerability to lapses in judgment and accidental misuses of strength, which cause not only himself but also those around him great suffering. Heracles is often “conspicuously absent” (226) and does not apply his intellect into much of what he does. Instead, his emotions are “quickly aroused and apt to get out of control” (226). For instance, when he was a child, he “disliked his music master” (229), so he “brained him with his lute (229), dealing “a fatal blow without intending it” (229). Another time, “with a careless thrust of his arm” (237), he accidentally kills an innocent boy who is serving him. Furthermore, wrongly motivated by his sexual appetite for Deianira, Heracles fights “the river-god Achelous” (236) although Achelous has “no desire to fight [Heracles]” (236). Heracles’s belligerent actions may hint at the Greek belief that the best way to resolve issues is through conflict rather than through negotiation.

Heracles’s tragedy is the irony of juxtaposing his cunningness during battle with a lack of decision-making skills and self-restraint outside of battle that reveals his apparent blessing, his great strength, as a curse that limits his success to situations involving conflict. Despite his inability “not to get roaring drunk” (242) in a house of mourning, he is smart enough to defeat Antaeus, a Giant who is invincible as long as he “[touches] the earth” (236) by “holding him in the air” (236) and strangling him. In spite of his “simplicity and blundering stupidity” (242), he is clever enough to trick Atlas into taking the sky back by pretending that he wants to put “a pad on his shoulders to ease the pressure” (234). Even after death, it is hard to imagine Heracles “contentedly enjoying rest and peace” (244), suggesting that this curse forces him into an endless cycle of violence. The fact that Heracles’s mistakes and shortcomings do not detract from his standing as the greatest Greek hero is highly indicative of the Greek culture’s greater reverence for physical strength than for intellectual ability.

In his role as both a hero and a victim, Heracles ironically distinguishes himself as both the inflictor and alleviator of suffering, emphasizing the importance of directing physical prowess using prudence. Otherwise, a person’s life will mirror the tragic life of Heracles and be subject to endless conflict, needless suffering, and uncontrollable impulses. Heracles, despite his inimitable strength, is still human, showing that although it may not be apparent at first, even the greatest of beings are capable of the simplest mistakes.

Read more
Order Creative Sample Now
Choose type of discipline
Choose academic level
  • High school
  • College
  • University
  • Masters
  • PhD
Deadline

Page count
1 pages
$ 10

Price