The Old Man and the Sea

One Classic Novel by Ernest Hemingway

March 18, 2021 by Essay Writer

My Musings

One of the bookish resolutions that I took in 2018 was to read 10 classics. My progress wasn’t noteworthy but I am determined to change it in the coming years. I picked up The Old Man and the Sea because I am participating in an Instagram readathon in which the prompt was to read a book that is a part of a “100 books to read in a lifetime” list. Needless to state, The Old Man and the Sea frequently graces many such lists and was therefore a good option.

What is the book all about and what to expect?

The Old Man and the Sea is a classic novel written in 1951 by Ernest Hemingway. It is considered to be the last major work by the eminent author to be published while he was alive. The book is a short read (under 100 pages) which is set in Havana, Cuba. The story tells us the tale of an old fisherman, a young boy and a beautiful and brave fish.

What is the story like?

Santiago is an old fisherman who has gone 84 days without fishing. He has now been termed as “salao” by the local people, which means that he is suffering from the worst form of unluckiness. Once a sturdy and healthy man, he was great at his job and would always catch the best fish. Now, he is an old and poor man with nothing much to keep his days and mind occupied. Even the boy whom he loves dearly and had trained well is now forbidden by his parents to work with the old man because of his unlucky strike. Manolin, the young boy, however, loves Santiago and cares for him. He often brings him food and tea and they talk about all things under the sun especially Santiago’s favourite – the American baseball. Determined to change his luck and bring home a catch big enough to get the town talking, the old man sets out on the sea on the 85th day. He goes out into the Gulf Stream and his bait soon gets taken by a big fish which he supposes is a Marlin. But, the fish will not relent so easily. The old man is also determined and won’t let go easily. What follows is a fight for life with both sides being equally brave and determined.

How good are the characters?

The characters are one of the most honest and brave ones that I have come across in a book in recent times. Santiago, the old man is strong willed. Though his body is weakened by the number of years he has seen, the same cannot be said about his resolve. That he is old schooled in his manners and in his treatment of the nature’s elements only adds to his charms. Unlike, many younger fishermen he respects the sea and calls her La Mar, a term of endearment. Santiago, for me, was a character that cannot be equaled. His respect for the Marlin is also noteworthy. Though he is determined to prevail, he still respects the fish and apologizes to it profusely. He calls it noble and brave, and sometimes laments about the futility of such an existence, which makes people do such horrible things to nature’s beautiful creatures. The author’s writing style I consider myself quite incompetent to comment on the author’s writing style. The author chooses a very simple story and turns it into a masterpiece. If that is not wonderful, I don’t know what else is. I also liked the way a non-human i.e. the Marlin plays such an important role in the book. The life lessons which the old man teaches while battling for his own existence is also something to look forward to in this book.

What I absolutely loved?

Undoubtedly, the climax is the best part of the book but more about that in the following paragraphs.What did I not like? The Old Man and the Sea is a difficult read for somebody who isn’t familiar with all the fishing jargons, methods, techniques and equipment. This is probably one of the reasons most readers find it difficult to finish the book. It also means that once you are through the book you emerge as a more informed reader. I personally found myself googling for a lot of information throughout the course of the book, and that is something that really makes me happy.

What about the climax?

The climax is what makes this book a winner. The magic of The Old Man and the Sea lies in its tragic ending and that is what elevates the book to its classic status. The climax is mind boggling and, in the end, if you are a sensitive and emotional reader like me, you cannot help but shed a tear or two for the old man Santiago and his undying spirit. How good was the entertainment quotient? The book, though a short read, is not an easy one. It takes time for the reader to get into it and it is also perceptibly slow towards the middle, but that doesn’t take away the entertainment quotient. Finishing the book does require some effort but, in the end, it is worth every minute that you spend reading it.

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The Old Man And The Sea By Ernest Hemingway: a Man Can Be Destroyed But Not Defeated

March 18, 2021 by Essay Writer

The movie Little Boy directed by Alejandro Monteverde in 2015 is about a small child whose father leaves to war, which leaves the little boy to fend for himself. When his father is gone he gets bullied and continues to worry about his father and wanting him to come back. However, the boy does not let what anybody, including his own brother, says get to him. He continues to have faith and hope which keeps him strong until finally, the good news arrives. In Ernest Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea, published in 1952 is a story about an old man named Santiago who continues to get destroyed but never defeated. With his salao, spending time with the Marlin, and facing hardships Santiago is able to build himself up.

Firstly, when Santiago states that “a man can be destroyed but not defeated” he refers to his salao. Throughout the novella Santiago experiences major amounts of this, especially before his fishing trip. For instance, when Santiago and Manolin sat on the Terrace many of the fishermen “made fun of the old man” however, he “was not angry”. The old man does not let anybody get to him no matter what they have to say. In addition to his salao, Santiago is also very poor. While the boy and the old man walked “to the old man’s shack” it was evident that his income was not good. When they walked in Santiago had a mast wrapped up against the wall and it was “nearly as long as the one room of the shack” which shows how small his space was. However, this is mainly due to not catching a fish in the past eighty-four days, and fishing is his only income. Santiago does not let his poverty get the worst of him. Despite all his “salao” Santiago does not give up on fishing which is his life. He is a determined and avid fisherman and he refuses to give up. In order to not be defeated, Santiago ignores the truth to keep himself strong. He caught a massive Marlin who was nearly an equal match for Santiago. But Santiago was bound to never give up. Santiago refuses to lose hope. He is just out at sea only focusing on this big fish he’s been waiting to catch. He feels a connection to this fish. This connection is the feeling of being brothers because of their strength, inner power, and loneliness. Even when he was tired while fighting the sharks he felt very weak and tired. In his fight, he killed 3 sharks. Even though the fight was unfair because he could not see he decided to remain mentally strong. In the end, he won the fight because his mental strength overcame his physical weakness.

In addition to when Santiago states that “a man can be destroyed but not defeated” he refers to his hardships. Santiago has faith, but despite all the hardships he goes through he does not lose hope. Even though the other fisherman do not believe in him, and the boy does not go with him he still goes fishing by himself. Santiago has a significant amount of inner strength and confidence. He decides to go fishing again, even though he is physically challenged, and his inner strength is as strong as ever. By paying attention to the birds he was able to follow them which lead him to find this great fish. He quickly made sure that his line was set and really hoped that this fish would take a bite. The moment he knew he had this great fish hooked he attempted to bring it in, but the fish did not budge. Instead, the fish just went on its course which left Santiago sitting there calmly. One of the biggest forms of saloa that Santiago experiences is his loneliness. Throughout the novella, Santiago remains lonely. However, in the beginning, is the most important part. Santiago even has a picture of his wife to make him feel that he even has the slightest amount of company. The entire town thought he was dead, and even if he was alive he would have come back with nothing. Everybody failed to see his inside instead of his outside. Manolin, who was the only person who believed in him, was the first to rush to him and see if he was ok.

From the very first pages of the story Santiago is a humble man with little worldly success to show for his many years. “Everything about him was old except his eyes, ” says the narrator. As blue as the sea, they were “cheerful and undefeated”. His humility is not a sign of resignation; not “disgraceful, ”

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The Old Man And The Sea: a Man Can Be Destroyed, But Never Defeated

March 18, 2021 by Essay Writer

The Old Man and the Sea

“A man can be destroyed but never defeated”. That was what Ernest Hemingway, one of the most popular writers in the twentieth century, said in his long nights at a bar. And it is precisely the motto of his novella The Old Man and the Sea. Santiago is an old and poor fisherman in a small Cuban town called Cojímar. For a long time, for longer than he can even remember, he was not able to catch a fish. He lives in a little shack, sandy floor, no kitchen. Every day he goes out to see in his little sail boat and every day he returns with nothing. But one day he decides it is enough.He packs his little boat with a few gallons of water, his line and goes off to sea at dusk. He plans to go far out to catch a big fish.

Santiago soon hooks a marlin, which initially he thinks weights over 1,000 pounds. Then starts an epic fight between man and beast, between an old man and a powerful fish.

The Old Man and the Sea is not a story about an old man fishing a marlin. It is a story about how a man can be destroyed, but never defeated. A man like Santiago will prefer to be killed before being defeated, be that hunger for not catching a fish in a long time or by a fish, whom although he thinks is more powerful, he knows is less intelligent. Santiago is a hero not because he catches a big marlin, but because he goes beyond.

This novel is a parable of the macho man Hemingway always wrote about. In Santiago one can see Robert Jordan, the main character of For Whom the Bell Tolls; Jake Barnes, of The Sun Also Rises; Harry Morgan, of To Have and Have Not; and Frederic Henry, of A Farewell to Arms. In fact, Santiago and all these characters are Hemingway, or at least the public image Hemingway wanted to show the world.

The Old Man and the Sea is a story about manhood as it was interpreted in the twentieth century. It is a manhood that is broken inside, that is dark, but callous on the outside, where men apparently are big machos, but on the inside as soft as a baby.

One can see that on the letters Hemingway sent to his friends. He was sensible and sensitive and suffered of mood swings that made him vulnerable. In Mary Welsh’s autobiography (she was Hemingway’s fourth and last wife), she narrated all Hemingway’s personality problems and his mental illness.

It seems as if The Old Man and the Sea was Hemingway’s last effort to show his alter ego (Hemingway killed himself ten years after writing this book, and critics argue it was the last great book he wrote). Santiago was a fisherman, just like Hemingway, and Santiago fished in the same sea than Hemingway.

Death is a vital part of the story and of the Hemingway literature. All his books have death somewhere: a good friend of Robert Jordan dies, Frederic Henry’s wife and child die, Harry Morgan’s skipper dies. Santiago does not die (at least the open ending does not lead to that), but the struggle between him and the marlin does lead the reader to think that Santiago will eventually die in the struggle. Eventually Santiago kills the marlin and drags him down to the beach, but another death menace reappears: sharks. Santiago fights the sharks, but they eat the marlin and leave only the skeleton. The skeleton interestingly resembles Santiago’s old body, shattered by a hard life in the sea.

War is another important characteristic of Hemingway’s life and literature. He was a soldier during World War I and was hurt in the Italian front. He then worked as a journalist and reporter in the Spanish Civil War and the World War II. As with his personal life, Hemingway’s characters have also been surrounded by war. The Sun Also Rises, For Whom the Bell Tolls and A Farewell to Arms all occur during war or post-war periods. Even though The Old Man and the Sea does not, the struggle between the old man and the marlin resembles war. It is a war between a man and an animal, between a man and his fate.

This brilliant novel is a perfectly balanced story, where Hemingway’s terse prose shines. There is nothing extra, nothing misses, both in respect to the story and to the craftsmanship of the writing. The Old Man and the Sea has won the Pulitzer Prize and probably made Hemingway en route to winning the Nobel Prize in 1954. This is a book for kids, teens and adults. Every time there will be a different meaning.

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Santiago’s Inner Power in The Old Man And The Sea

March 18, 2021 by Essay Writer

Santiago is the main character in The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway. Santiago believes that “a man can be destroyed but not defeated.” I think that the term of heroism relates to his belief because in many stories the hero, usually a man, is completely destroyed in body and in thought but they aren’t defeated. In the story of Hercules, his feelings were destroyed and he felt like his life crashed down but he came back stronger than he was before. In Santiago’s story, The Old Man and the Sea, he is tired out from fighting off sharks to keep his catch. In the end the sharks end up eating all of the fish leaving nothing but its skeleton. Exhausted from the fight Santiago continues to head back home. When Santiago gets to his home he lies down and gets some sleep while the fish’s skeleton stay lying on his boat. The town was in awe at the skeleton of the big fish and some even thought it was a shark. Marking Santiago as proof that pride will drive men to do incredible things.

Santiago went around eighty seven days with bad luck and not catching any fish. His apprentice was forced to join another fishing boat due to the old man’s bad luck. The apprentice still came to the old man’s boat and home every night to make sure things were tied up on the boat and that Santiago had food in his shack. Santiago decided to sail farther than he has ever gone the next day and try his luck to catch some fish out there. He set up his fishing lines and waited around until a fish was caught. For three days Santiago was reeling in the big fish, called a marlin, until the marlin got tired and Santiago was finally able to reel the marlin up close to the boat. Santiago stabbed the marlin fish with a harpoon and drug it up onto the boat. The marlin left a blood trail during the trip back to shore. The blood trail attracted sharks that attacked Santiago for his catch. Santiago had to fight off the sharks with the harpoon until a shark pulled the harpoon into the ocean leaving Santiago to make a spear made from an oar with a knife tied to it. After a while the sharks have completely eaten the marlin’s meat leaving nothing but its skeleton. Santiago seeing his trip as a complete loss continues to head back to shore. When he gets to the shore he ties down his boat at the dock and heads to his shack to sleep. Santiago was very upset with himself saying that he “went out too far” and if he didn’t go out as far he thinks that he would have caught a fish and the fish would have made it back to shore completely in flesh.

Santiago’s heroism is very unusual because he wasn’t very heroic at most parts until he was fighting off sharks to keep his catch. Santiago can be seen as a hero to his apprentice for showing him everything he knows about fishing and helping the apprentice learn to fish as good as Santiago does. There are a lot of similarities between a classic hero and Santiago. Both show great strength, bravery, and the certainty of getting the job done. Even though heroes are very admirable they tend to lead themselves into their own downfall with their qualities. Most heroes’ downfalls are heartbreaks or distractions from their “job”. Santiago’s downfall was most likely his pride but it was also the sharks. Killing the marlin fish was done mainly out of pride which led to his downfall because the marlin’s blood attracted the sharks that ate the marlin and attacked Santiago for the marlin. He continuously says that he is sorry to the skeleton of the marlin fish knowing he has ruined them both. Thinking that he shouldn’t have gone out as far as he did and deciding that his downfall was only because he went out too far and accepting that it was not his fault for trying. Santiago and his journey stood as proof that pride motivates a man to do great things.

In some ways Santiago’s heroism is very unique because he is teaching his apprentice how to be a good fisherman like he is along with trying to get his business to go back to being good like it used to be. Most hero stories show the hero fighting the bad things or bad people and saving the city or town. In Santiago’s story he is showing people to not give up during the bad or hard times and he is teaching a younger man to be the good guy that he is even through fishing. Santiago is a hero to most men and to his apprentice. Throughout the novel Santiago has an undying determination to catch the marlin fish and bring it back to shore with him. Even if Santiago would have returned to shore with the marlin fish, his glory would have been short lived along with the marlin’s meat. Santiago’s glory doesn’t come from the journey or the battle with the fish itself but from his pride and determination to fight for the marlin fish.

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Isolation in “The Old Man And the Sea”

March 18, 2021 by Essay Writer

Isolation is a term in which it is familiar to mean to be secluded from others and or to remain alone or apart from the rest of society. In The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway, isolation is a primary theme that defines who the old man is and helps with one’s reflection on the parts of life that can be considered most important. The old man is a character isolated from people – and, in a way, from the society entirely in his time on the sea. The isolation helps the author define who he is and emphasize the unique nature of the old man’s character. Isolation becomes both a flaw, as he suffers from loneliness, but also a necessary quality he may need in staying strong as he suffers through long hours by himself being pulled by a fish.

The story starts off with Hemingway introducing the old man, Santiago, as “an old man who fished alone… and he had gone eighty-four days now without taking a fish.” Isolation can be one of the hardest mental sufferings to cope with, but Santiago shows us that he still perseveres to focus on what he has to do. Hemingway illustrates Santiago like this because he wants the audience to know from the start that this was a man you could feel sorry for. Manolin, a young boy who Santiago taught how to fish, was forced by his parents to switch boats when Santiago was unable to catch a fish for the 40th day. Manolin, feeling a strong fatherly bond with Santiago, continued to help him by helping him carry his supplies back to the shack and made sure Santiago ate proper food. This loneliness could have been partly due to the old age Santiago dealt with. Throughout the book, Manolin is the only boy introduced who actually cares about Santiago and looks up to him with respect. Evidently, all the other fisherman make fun of Santiago, for his bad luck, or they pity him, because of his poor situation. The author also describes how he hides his deceased wife’s picture under a clean shirt because it makes him feel “too lonely” to see it. The impression we get from this characterization is that Santiago is an old widower barely managing a existence, through the help of a son figure. This may be one of the reasons why as to how Santiago continuously wished for Manolin’s presence to help him throughout his journey on the boat.

Hemingway characterizes isolation throughout the boat ride when he writes about Santiago talking to himself. This shows that whenever he is on his own he misses the sound of another voice. Santiago frequently wishes that he had Manolin there with him so that he would be able to get some assistance in bringing the fish in more quickly. Santiago’s line ‘I wish I had the boy,” proved how isolated he was from the outside world while on this voyage to catch the fish, due to the way he was almost begging for someone to be with him in any way possible. However, since he was alone, he was able to think about the many different aspects of his life. He thinks, ‘No one should be alone in their old age, he thought. But it is unavoidable.’ Evidently, as the people around you start to die of old age, the remaining people are forced to live in isolation by themselves; it is something that will happen at some point. When night falls and he has still not brought the marlin in, Santiago ‘looked cross the sea and knew how alone he was now.’ He felt vulnerable and weak in that moment and wished someone was there to help him, and then he saw some birds and realized that ‘no man was ever alone on the sea.’

Santiago had the chance, when the fish was not pulling or fighting, to think about himself and what he saw as important in his life. While alone on the ocean, Santiago’s thoughts often turn to DiMaggio, the baseball player. In Santiago’s perspective, this baseball player was a symbol of strength and courage, and that could be why his thoughts went to relate with DiMaggio when he needed to reassure himself of his own strength and power. Loneliness for Santiago meant to come out on the other side with improvement of his skills and the recognition of what it was like to have pushed his limits to their maximum capacity.

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The Christianity Issues in ‘The Old Man And The Sea’

March 18, 2021 by Essay Writer

The Old Man and the Sea looks like a Christian illustration from multiple points of view. Its hero, the angler Santiago, appears epitomize Christian temperances, and the story plainly and more than once interfaces his preliminaries adrift to Christ’s misery on the cross. Notwithstanding, a cautious examination of Santiago’s character and activities demonstrates that he is certainly not a Christian character and that, in all actuality, he typifies a warrior ethic that is contrary with Christian standards. The parallels between The Old Man and the Sea and the commonplace Biblical story of the execution add account and enthusiastic capacity to the novel, however Hemingway does not utilize them to propel a religious good or exercise. Rather, they serve to propel Santiago’s warrior logic. In spite of the fact that The Old Man and the Sea has shallow Christian components, at its center it can’t be viewed as a Christian novel.

At first, Santiago is by all accounts a perfect Christian. He keeps Christian symbols in his home, he alludes to God and Christ more than once, and Hemingway points out his “confidence,” “expectation,” and “love”— the three essential Christian ideals. Be that as it may, these appearances are shallow. For instance, however Santiago says he has “confidence,” he doesn’t utilize the word in a religious sense; rather, he utilizes it regarding a superstitious thought of fortunes and to depict his emotions about baseball. When he supplicates amid his fight with the fish, he introduces his petitions by saying he isn’t religious and afterward continues to discuss them mechanically, overlooking the words. Santiago’s watchful and trained way to deal with everything in life is stressed all through the novel, so his messiness here just attracts regard for his absence of duty to his petitions. Significantly more vital, Santiago never considers God. Rather, he discovers solace, quality, and importance by considering mainstream things: the human world, baseball, and the animals of the ocean—not religion.

Santiago isn’t religious, yet he does live by an ethical code and has a rationality of life. He is an ace of his specialty, considerably more mindful to its fine points of interest than the other angler in his town are. He represents the masculine ideals of mettle and assurance. What’s more, he has a solid feeling of good and bad with regards to slaughtering. He adores and regards the fish he seeks after, thinking of them as his “siblings,” and he loathes executing an animal for no great reason. More than whatever else, Santiago has a continuing pride, which he communicates most obviously at the times he understands that more sharks are coming to eat the immense marlin he has gotten. He says, “A man can be wrecked however not crushed”— that is, a genuine man will battle in any case, to death if necessary, yet he will never surrender. Together, these standards shape a furiously autonomous warrior’s theory of life, where living admirably is tied in with meeting foes in fair fight. This is certifiably not a Christian point of view, which would advocate a patient restraint and a docile resistance of hardship.

Amusingly, Hemingway utilizes Christian imagery to propel this substitute perspective. After Santiago has snared the considerable marlin, he passes the angling line over his back and holds it in the two hands, cutting his palms more than once. This stance takes after that of Christ on the cross, and Santiago’s injuries summon the stigmata, the cut injuries Christ bore from the execution. Be that as it may, toward the finish of his misery, Santiago isn’t recovered or renewed like Christ. Or maybe, his fish is stolen from him by sharks, and he comes back to arrive near death. His anguish must be viewed as redemptive on the grounds that, in Santiago’s view, battle and avoidance are closes in themselves. In the novel’s rationality, we are our best and most genuine selves just in a demise battle. This message is best outlined in Hemingway’s depiction of the plain snapshot of the fish’s demise: “At that point the fish woke up, with his passing in him, and rose high out of the water demonstrating all his incredible length and width and all his capacity and his excellence.” Only in death does the fish come totally alive, or is its significance altogether obvious.

In a Christian story, a profound religious message may be imparted through the activities of a conventional man. In The Old Man and the Sea, Hemingway turns this scholarly tradition on end. Rather, he appropriates the intense, thunderous story of Christ’s execution keeping in mind the end goal to pass on and laud the existence logic of a normal man.

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The Character Of Santiago In The Old Man And The Sea By Ernest Hemingway

November 3, 2020 by Essay Writer

In Ernest Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea, published in 1952 is a story about an old man named Santiago who continues to get destroyed but never defeated. With his salao, spending time with the Marlin, and facing hardships Santiago is able to build himself up.

Firstly, when Santiago states that “a man can be destroyed but not defeated” he refers to his salao. Throughout the novella Santiago experiences major amounts of this, especially before his fishing trip. For instance, when Santiago and Manolin sat on the Terrace many of the fishermen “made fun of the old man” however, he “was not angry”. The old man does not let anybody get to him no matter what they have to say. In addition to his salao, Santiago is also very poor. While the boy and the old man walked “to the old man’s shack” it was evident that his income was not good. When they walked in Santiago had a mast wrapped up against the wall and it was “nearly as long as the one room of the shack” which shows how small his space was. However, this is mainly due to not catching a fish in the past eighty-four days, and fishing is his only income. Santiago does not let his poverty get the worst of him. Despite all his “salao” Santiago does not give up on fishing which is his life. He is a determined and avid fisherman and he refuses to give up. In order to not be defeated, Santiago ignores the truth to keep himself strong. He caught a massive Marlin who was nearly an equal match for Santiago. But Santiago was bound to never give up. Santiago refuses to lose hope. He is just out at sea only focusing on this big fish he’s been waiting to catch. He feels a connection to this fish. This connection is the feeling of being brothers because of their strength, inner power, and loneliness. Even when he was tired while fighting the sharks he felt very weak and tired. In his fight, he killed 3 sharks. Even though the fight was unfair because he could not see he decided to remain mentally strong. In the end, he won the fight because his mental strength overcame his physical weakness.

In addition to when Santiago states that “a man can be destroyed but not defeated” he refers to his hardships. Santiago has faith, but despite all the hardships he goes through he does not lose hope. Even though the other fisherman do not believe in him, and the boy does not go with him he still goes fishing by himself. Santiago has a significant amount of inner strength and confidence. He decides to go fishing again, even though he is physically challenged, and his inner strength is as strong as ever. By paying attention to the birds he was able to follow them which lead him to find this great fish. He quickly made sure that his line was set and really hoped that this fish would take a bite. The moment he knew he had this great fish hooked he attempted to bring it in, but the fish did not budge. Instead, the fish just went on its course which left Santiago sitting there calmly. One of the biggest forms of saloa that Santiago experiences is his loneliness. Throughout the novella, Santiago remains lonely. However, in the beginning, is the most important part. Santiago even has a picture of his wife to make him feel that he even has the slightest amount of company. The entire town thought he was dead, and even if he was alive he would have come back with nothing. Everybody failed to see his inside instead of his outside. Manolin, who was the only person who believed in him, was the first to rush to him and see if he was ok.

From the very first pages of the story Santiago is a humble man with little worldly success to show for his many years. “Everything about him was old except his eyes, ” says the narrator. As blue as the sea, they were “cheerful and undefeated”. His humility is not a sign of resignation; not “disgraceful, ”

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Chasing Fish: Comparing The Ultimate Goals Found in “The Old Man and The Sea” And “Dances with Wolves”

November 3, 2020 by Essay Writer

We are all chasing our own fish. We’re all trying desperately to grasp something that is just out of our reach. For Santiago, the main character in Hemingway’s The Old Man and The Sea, he is chasing a literal fish. He exhibits exceptional amounts of patience towards this fish – as one must when pursuing an important goal – spending eighty-four uneventful days at sea in hopes of finally snagging the monster. Santiago sacrifices his physical and mental stability whilst in pursuit of his ultimate goal, and if one looks at the bigger picture, Kicking Bird of Dances with Wolves does the same. But, in order to compare the ultimate goals of the main characters, we must first deduce what Kicking Bird’s “fish” is. What is it that keeps slipping for his clutches?

Some could argue that Kicking Bird’s metaphorical “fish” is the white man, that he is constantly yearning to understand their customs and way of life. This would explain his inquisitiveness and interest toward Lieutenant Dunbar throughout the book. Though this is sound reasoning, I would argue against it. If Kicking Bird’s “fish” is the white man, then he would have caught it long ago when he adopted Stands With A Fist into his family. Kicking Bird would have been given the opportunity to examine the white customs first hand – however limited they were – from Stands With A Fist when she was younger and not fully assimilated into the Sioux culture yet. Kicking Bird isn’t wanting to only understand the white man’s way of life and customs, but his motives as well. He wants to fully understand why the white man is pioneering through the Sioux Lands, and what it is they are hoping to accomplish by doing so. By analyzing the book and Kicking Bird’s actions throughout, one could come to the conclusion that Kicking Bird’s “fish” is the understanding of the white man’s incentive.

When compared side-by-side, Santiago’s and Kicking Bird’s behavior towards their respective “fish” are nearly identical. Just as Santiago tolerates the marlin’s antics – regardless of how frustrating they may be – Kicking Bird is incredibly patient with the antics of Lieutenant Dunbar. Towards the beginning of Dances With Wolves, Kicking Bird observes a far more patient attitude towards Dunbar than others in the tribe. An example of such behavior appears when the Lieutenant tries to convey the word “buffalo” despite the language barrier. Instead of deeming Dunbar crazy for rolling around in the dirt and trying to leave like Wind In His Hair, Kicking Bird sits quietly and tries to decipher the meaning behind Dunbar’s makeshift skit. Kicking Bird also takes it upon himself to help the other members of the tribe teach Dunbar the Sioux language, a monotonous task that requires an extensive amount of patience. Why would Kicking Bird take on such a tedious task if it is not to gain what he is seeking, if it isn’t to catch his “fish?”

Kicking Bird believes that being civil with Dunbar will help him build up a trust with the Lieutenant, and forging such trust would finally allow Kicking Bird to ask what it is that the white man wants so badly from the Sioux land. Later on in the book, Kicking Bird comes extremely close to broaching the topic with Dunbar. He asks the Lieutenant how many white men will be passing through the Sioux land, and the answer Dunbar gives is a very ominous “like the stars.” Though Kicking Bird’s long-standing question is partially answered with how many white men are coming, he is still unaware of the reason behind the white man’s actions. He is still in pursuit of that aspect of his “fish.”

Both Santiago and Kicking Bird sacrificed much for their “fish.” They both relinquish parts of their lives to pursue their ultimate goals, and some of their actions yield harsh consequences. Santiago nearly dies of dehydration, and is forced to cope with the cuts in his palms and the cramps in his shoulders from fighting with the marlin for three days and three nights. Kicking Bird has to deal with the condemning attitudes of numerous tribe members regarding his acceptance of Dunbar. Both men finally made it to shore, so to speak; Santiago made it back to his home – however empty-handed – and Kicking Bird was no longer ridiculed for his fondness of Dunbar. Although both survived their respective chase, both essentially became the pursuit of their “fish,” and in the end, neither truly caught it.

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The novel The Old Man and the Sea

November 3, 2020 by Essay Writer

The novel The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway is set in a Cuban community whose fundamental economic activity and staple means of survival is based on the fishing activities and dependence of fish as the primary source of nutrition. The themes in the story are depicted and revolve around an epic struggle between a veteran fisherman and the ultimate catch of his life, which came after eighty-four days of failed endeavors at sea. The main character in both the film and novel is the old fisherman, Santiago, and his apprentice, Manolin who watches over the old man in his days of struggle and futile attempts riddled with bad luck that has seen him go for eighty-four straight days without success (Hemingway pg. 11). This analysis explores the strengths of the film in comparison with the original thematic concerns in the novel, the old man, and the sea.

The action and adventure film from the novel by Hemingway is a one hour and twenty-three-period film, a carbon depiction of the messages that the novel itself contain. The message that comes out clearly from the onset of the novel and the film is persistence and determination; not losing hope on one’s chosen trade no matter what. Santiago never relents despite the isolation that begets him leaving him with the young boy, Manolin who believes in him and is mindful of his welfare. In the novel, the sail of his skiff represented the ‘flag of permanent defeat,’ as most of the locals, including the family of his apprentice, saw him as a failure and jinxed person who could offer their boy nothing at best (Halliday¸ pg. 18). The persistence exhibited by Santiago show the honor in struggle and quest to never losing hope until that day when he finally landed a big catch, marlin. Even after the catch at sea with marlin, he still endures a three-day struggle to bring the huge catch ashore, warding off sharks and other sea creatures that continuously ate the flesh of the fish that he had finally landed.

There are different aspects that come into the movie more clearly than they are perceived in the novel. For instance, the pride and the moral belief that Santiago had in his line of trade was so immense that in the end only his heroic abilities and admiration by the people who had berated him as perennial failure became evident. In his inability to bring whole the fish ashore without the sharks invading his catch, elements of greatness rather than failure became more explicit in the end. To the person who perfectly understood and believed in him, he feels a bit disappointed and believes he should have done more to reassure him of his belief in him and asks personal questions the probable reason for his own undoing, the answer he gives is “Nothing…I went too far” (Hemingway pg. 178).

The mood that comes out in both the movie and the novel is that of sympathy and compassion that Manolin had for the Old man. The fact that everyone is withdrawn and uninterested in his affairs compel Manolin to take a keen interest in him and provide him with the basics that he needs in order to survive in the days that he fails to secure any catch, and they were plenty (Hemingway pg. 154). He offers Santiago, company throughout the times when he is not at sea and updates him on the topics of baseball sports through the newspapers (Halliday¸ pg. 14). That comes out clearly since the old man spent a significant amount of his time drawing the connection from the natural environment, considering the fish, the birds, and stars were the only brothers and friends. To show him more love and care Manolin was worried continuously over the absence of the old man for the three days he was at sea struggling with the huge catch he took most of his efforts to bring home. When he finally arrives and falls into a deep sleep from the exhaustion of the struggle, he fetches him some coffee and waits by his side to wake up. Santiago, through the little care and attention he received from Manolin, had rich energy free of fatigue, a spirit that was evidently indefatigable and made him feel more accomplished despite the reservations of observers that he amounted to nothing much.

The compassion that Manolo had for the Oldman was so boundless such that observers were standing by at times asked if by any chance they were related. For instance, in the movie, Pruitt asks Lopez if they are relatives, the reply that Lopez gives that they are only related ‘by affection. (Halliday¸ pg. 14)’ He usually wishes Santiago good luck whenever he sets out for the fishing endeavors, on most occasions in which he is all alone by himself, and he either talks loudly to himself or sings. The age gap between the two friends never at once became a barrier as mandolin believed that the old man was a great fisherman and that, soon, he will come back from the fishing activity that saw him absent for almost three days leaving Manolin worried.

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Hemingway’s Code Hero in The Old Man and the Sea. Traits & Definition

September 29, 2020 by Essay Writer

Introduction

Ernest Hemingway, a modernist,the author of The Old Man and the Sea, The Sun Also Rises, A Farewell To Arms, etc presents unique characters in each of his literature compositions. Referred to as the Hemingway code heroes, these characters portray stringently enforced laws of behavior, which allow them to live up to the richness of their lives. Hemingway sets a good illustration of code heroes. These are not people bearing occult powers or people campaigning for truth or justice.

To solve the misconception, Hemingway sets in with his The Old Man and the Sea, featuring Santiago, an aged angler and an epitome of code heroes. Santiago displays many code hero qualities, including the three essential code qualities of honor and integrity, grace under pressure, and determination to succeed.

Honor and Integrity

Santiago lives his life with honor and integrity. With this quality, he passes for a code hero, as the author illustrates. He is a man who knows well that respect is two-way traffic, and for him to be respected, he ought to respect others in return. However, according to him, it matters less whether he will gain respect by the end of the day.

All he knows is that he bears the obligation to respect people as well as their decisions. Though aged, he enjoys the company of the young boy, Manolin. On one fishing occasion, Manolin tells Santiago, “And the best fisherman is you…No I know others better” (23). This drives home the point that Santiago is a man of honor, not necessarily in the field of fishing, but in life in general.

He deserves credit as the boy puts it. In his struggle with the fish, Santiago, as Hemingway’s code hero in The Old Man and the Sea, utters words that point out his level of integrity. He respects and loves, not only people but also animals. ”Fish, I love you and respect you very much…But I will kill you dead before this day ends” (Hemingway 54).

In addition, he uplifts the dignity of all people, despite their differences. He symbolically says that all of them can fish to show how he respects their varied capabilities. Building on these deductions, it is inferable that honor and integrity form part of Santiago’s life as one of the main values.

Grace Under Pressure

Santiago displays grace under pressure when he tries to catch the marlin and get it back home. It costs him his time, energy, and a good deal of patience to make the catch. Although he finally makes a catch, it proves hard for him to draw it into the boat. However, he does not give up. His eyes are set only to his goal, a token of grace. In fact, as his hands and fingers ache because of his struggle to pull the marlin, “He rubbed the cramped hand against his trousers and tried to gentle the fingers” (Hemingway 60).

The gentling of the fingers is the sign of grace during the pressing situation of his hands. In another case, Santiago symbolically graces himself with the words, “But I must have the confidence, and I must be worthy of the great DiMaggio who does all things perfectly even with the pain of the bone spur in his heel” (Hemingway 68).

He strives to imagine a day when he will be as great as DiMaggio, who is a famous baseball champion. He is his model, and therefore, even if pressed by life’s circumstances, as his fishing, he knows that he can pass for a great person. Thus, the author qualifies in developing the character of grace under pressure as possessed by code heroes like Santiago.

Determination to Succeed

According to Hemingway’s code hero definition, this is a person who possesses courage the determination to succeed, Although Santiago has not caught a fish for a very long time, he sails to the sea every day and is determined to succeed in the catching. Even after sailing far in the sea without making any catch, he never gives up. “Everything about him was old except his eyes, and they were the same color as the sea and were cheerful and undefeated” (Hemingway 49). His wide-open and cheerful eyes in his old age show how he is determined to live and not to die.

When he catches the huge marlin fish, it pulls him for three consecutive days and nights, but Santiago does not let go of it. In addition, the blood that the fish smears on the seawaters attracts other predators that fight to take the fish from the hands of Santiago. In response, he fights them back, killing as many of them as possible.

In the process, he says, “I’ll fight them until I die” (Hemingway 115), words that reveal his determination to succeed in taking the fish off the sea. In his claim, “…a man is not made for defeat. A man can be destroyed but not defeated” (Hemingway 103), which is no more than a sign of his determination. Therefore, Santiago bears the code hero characteristic feature of being determined to succeed.

Conclusion

Santiago has the important code hero traits of honor and integrity, grace under pressure, and determination to succeed. Hemingway qualifies in defining a code hero.

Technically, he drives away the prevailing misconception about code heroes. The aged angler carries the day through the way he stands as an illustration of code heroes. Though aged, he stands out as a man of honor and integrity. He owes respect and love to all, whether young or old.

Moreover, as an angler and considering the struggles he encounters, he pictures grace in every pressing situation that comes his way. He manifests his determination to succeed when he decides never to let go of the marlin despite the other fish, which try to pull it out of his hands. To sum up, He exemplifies a Hemingway code hero.

Works Cited

Hemingway, Ernest. The Old Man and the Sea. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 2005. Print.

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