The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

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The Reasons to Read the Adventures of Tom Sawyer

April 13, 2021 by Essay Writer

An Adventurous Book

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer is a literary classic. It is a great part of American literature and history. It is a great model of writing to all those who read it. Not only can this book be a considerable source of inspiration to all writers, this book is enjoyable unlike all of the monotonous books you might read daily. Who doesn’t want to read an exciting book with a fun story line? This is a very adventurous book. At some points keeps you on the edge of your seat from all of the suspense. While at other points Twain has you laughing as Tom gets into more mischief. This is a book that makes you want to read more. There is no better reason to read a book then for the enjoyment you receive.

Realistic Representation

Twain based his novel, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, mostly on his personal memories of growing up. Twain states, “most of the adventures recorded in this book really occurred”. In addition, the character of Tom Sawyer was based off a couple boys that he knew. This means that Twain’s novel is a realistic representation of life back in the 1840’s. While reading this book people can learn what it was like to live back in the 1840’s. Nearly all of the characters in Twain’s novel resemble people he knew from his childhood.

Utopian Picture

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer spends most of it’s focus on creating an utopian picture of boyhood. Therefore, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer never really deals with the larger issues that some of Twain’s other books contain. For example, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer doesn’t directly deal with slavery. Furthermore the book seems to exhibit xenophobia against Native American Injun Joe, but Injun Joe’s murders justify the town’s hate and fear for him. Because the novel evades explicit criticism of racism, slavery, and xenophobia, the novel has been able to escape the debate about the xenophobia and language. Nobody should shy away from this book for these reasons alone. To this day, this book still remains as one of Twain’s more popular works.

Life Lessons

The story follows the moral development of a troublemaker. Twain’s novel teaches us a lot of important life lessons that we can use, and who wouldn’t want that. For example Tom discovers in the book that you should always tell the truth. Tom withheld the truth for so long and felt horrible. He teaches us that telling the truth helps to take away that horrible burden. We can take this lesson and all of the other ones found in the book and apply them into our own lives.

The Essence of Childhood

Sometimes it seems like Tom and I are the same. Some of the stories in the novel are reminiscent. Tom is making the transition into adulthood just like many of us. He reminds us of all the fun and trouble we had as a child. Tom gets into a lot of mischief just like we did as kids. He lies a lot, often runs away, and steals. We start to see ourselves as Tom Sawyer. Even if you’re an adult the events of this book evoke the memories of childhood in your mind. Twain has captured the essence of childhood. Whether or not one has read the novel, many of the scenes are familiar and have become a part of our cultural heritage.

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178

Evolution of Tom Sawyer

April 13, 2021 by Essay Writer

“To exist is to change, to change is to mature, to mature is to go on creating oneself endlessly”(Henri Bergson). In the beginning of the novel, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain, the main character Tom was very immature. He was manipulative, puerile, and egocentric. He would manipulate others for his own benefit, not caring about any damage he caused. As the novel continues, Tom begins to develop and start becoming a man. He journeys through adolescence, and starts to mature. Because of his growth into manhood, he starts to do things for others, and commit courageous and brave acts. As Tom Sawyer grows throughout the novel, he starts to show signs of maturity and commits courageous acts.

As the novel progresses, Tom shows signs of maturity. In the beginning of the novel, Tom Sawyer was very selfish and didn’t really care about responsibility. Later in the novel, Tom witnesses things and goes through many experiences that helped him sofisticate and taught him many important lessons. He begins to put others before himself, and tries to help others, which show that he is becoming more wise and responsible. When Huckleberry Finn is gifted with a chance to live normal life, he wants to abandon it to run away. Since Tom cared about Huck, he convinces him to stay and try to deal with the certain rules that living like a kid have. Tom uses his manipulative ways but not for his own good, this time. When trying to convince Huck to return home Tom says, “Huck, I wouldn’t want to, and I don’t want to-but what would people say? Why they’d say, ‘Mph! Tom Sawyer’s Gang! Pretty low characters in it’ They’d mean you, Huck. You wouldn’t like that, and I wouldn’t” (Twain 211). Huck then agrees to go back to Widow Douglas so he could be a part of their “gang”. Tom manipulates Huck to go back to the Widow Douglas. This situation shows Tom’s growth and adulthood because in the beginning of the novel, Tom would manipulate people for his own benefit. But, this situation shows how Tom manipulated people for good. Tom wanted Huck to live a better life with the Widow, so he said that he could be in their gang if he goes back. But in actuality, Tom just wanted Huck to live a good life. Tom shows his adulthood when he begins to use his manipulative nature for other’s benefits.

Tom shows boldness throughout the novel, by doing things that others would fear to do. Since the beginning of the novel, Tom has done things that normally people wouldn’t do. But, when Tom and Huck witness a murder, Tom does something incredibly brave. Even though both Huck and Tom make an agreement to never speak of what happened the night of the murder, Tom defies that because he did not want an innocent man to be punished. When viewing the trial of Muff Potter Tom decides to speak up and say who the true murderer is even though his safety may be in danger because of this. “Tom began-hesitatingly at first, but as he warmed up to his subject, his words flowed more and more easily: in a little while every sound ceased but his own voice; every eye fixed itself upon him; with parted lips and bated breath the audience hung upon his words, taking no note of time, rapt in the ghastly fascinations of the tale”(Twain 143). Tom spoke about the night of the murder even though he knew that Injun Joe would come after him. He decided that he needed to speak up about the murder, even though he was slightly scared. Everyone watched as he spoke about the incident, bravely. To be courageous is to face difficulties without having fear. When Tom sees that Muff Potter is being accused of murdering someone, when he really didn’t do it, he speaks up. This is remarkably brave because he says who the true murderer is. And he knows that once he testifies and says that Injun Joe is the actual murderer, Injun Joe would want revenge and Tom would then be in danger. Even though Tom knew this information prior to saying what he saw, Tom decided to testify anyways because he knew it was the right thing to do. Tom shows bravery and courage when he speaks up about the true murderer of the doctor.

Tom Sawyer starts showing bravery and signs of adulthood, as he ages throughout the novel. Tom shows fearlessness and adult qualities when he tries to help others and speaks the truth. He helps Huck try to live a normal kid’s life by convincing him to go back to the people that love him. Tom also helps a man that was wrongly accused in trial by speaking up about what really happened. As people grow older, they become more cultured and some begin to help others and do things with audacity.

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181

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer: Money Can’t Always Buy Happiness

March 18, 2021 by Essay Writer

The Summary of the Novel

This is a story about a boy named Tom Sawyer, a rebellious boy who lives in St. Petersburg, America. He lives with his Aunt Polly, a strict woman who constantly worries about him.

Tom is crafty and sly, tricking most of the boys in his town to paint his fence for him. His closest friend is Huck, another rebellious boy like himself. A new family moves into town, the Thatcher’s, and Tom is in love with their daughter, Becky. As Tom and Huck play in a graveyard with a dead cat, they overhear some men and witness a murder by Injun Joe, a violent man set on revenge. Tom and his friends pretend to be pirates on a nearby island, living out in the woods for a while. However, because they are gone for so long, the townspeople assume that the boys have drowned in the river. Tom and the boys eventually return. Tom wrestles on whether to tell anyone about Injun Joe, but he is then forced to testify in court and Injun Joe runs away. As the manhunt for Injun Joe continues, Tom and Huck decide to search for buried treasure. However, they come across a haunted house, which is Injun Joe’s hiding place. They overhear that he has buried the treasure in a secret location and try to follow him, but instead Huck stops the murder of a widow. Tom takes Becky on a trip to a nearby cave and they get lost. Things look bad, as they’ve run out of food, but Tom finds a way out and saves Becky. Tom then tells Huck that the treasure is in the cave and the two of them get it. They both become instantly wealthy.

In the end, Huck struggles to the rich lifestyle, while Tom enjoys the money, but intends on being a classy thief.

Adjusting to Life with Money

As always a lot can be said about this story, but what draws my interest and attention is the idea that money can’t always buy happiness. In today’s world, it’s often a matter of “If I only had more money, I’d be happy” but we don’t see that in the world of Tom Sawyer. In his world, the poor are often the most free.

By the end of the story, the author provides two rowdy country boys with an enormous amount of wealth and they don’t know what to do with it. In fact, they struggle to adjust to life with money.

All Huck wants to do is go outside whenever he wants and enjoy nature. He wants to fish, swim, and explore caves. He doesn’t care about the fancy clothes and gourmet food. In his simple ways, he recognizes all of the obligations that wealth brings with it, like manners, politics, and how possessions can begin to possess us. And so for him, wealth is bondage, not freedom.

Even Tom pushes back against his wealth in a way. Instead of investing the money or buying nice things, Tom wants to start a gang of thieves. And while some may say that this shows his growing desire for more wealth, I think Tom wants to be a thief for the thrills and rebellion, not the accrued wealth.

Аnd so it’s kind of interesting that the two characters in the story that probably want or need the money the least end up the richest. But that’s a good thing. It shows that money doesn’t have to change people, especially for our protagonist, even if that protagonist is as rebellious and mischievous as Tom Sawyer.

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160

The Character of Tom Sawyer

March 18, 2021 by Essay Writer

When we are first introduced to Tom Sawyer, via his good friend Huck Finn, we learn of his conservative nature near immediately. Tom suggests they tie a slave to a tree, “for fun,” (p. 6) and while we can assume that this is common behavior for young men of his time, Huck is a far different story. Later, when approached with the idea of freeing Jim, the aforementioned slave, Tom Sawyer agrees to go along with his dear friend’s plan, but not solely out of believing it is the noble thing to do, instead because he knows it will require an adventurous spirit. This shows us just how stubborn and ignorant the young boy is. Followed by a group of bored, but adventurous, children, Tom repeatedly mentions how he wants to start a gang of boys. We can assume he longs to start trouble with this group of young men, I came to this conclusion after studying his other behavior. He often ropes others into his mischievous plans by stating that they will join in, rather than asking them. This shows just how authoritative he is, even from the very beginning of the story when he suggest they begin the gang by stating, “Now, we’ll start this band of robbers and call it Tom Sawyer’s Gang. Everybody that wants to join has got to take an oath, and write his name in blood,” (p. 7) suggesting that the others show their utmost loyalty to him by taking a blood oath. We see just how inspiring Tom’s bravery is on the other children when Huck convinces himself to continue onward with his plan by thinking of how Tom would handle the situation. Huck states that, “Tom Sawyer wouldn’t back out now, and so I won’t either.” (p. 70)

We see this again near the climax of the story when Tom changes the plan mid-action. Huck questions his decision and Tom responds with, “but it’s the plan now,” (p. 238) suggesting that his idea is superior to the original plan.The first time we see a major change in Tom is when he is reading the list of scrawlings they had written, deciding which one to engrave on the wall. The writings were heartfelt and tear-jerking, clear when we see that, “Tom’s voice trembled whilst he was reading them, and he most broke down,” (p. 261) suggesting that Sawyer was nearly moved to tears by the pain written in these words.

We see that he is not as ignorant and unkind as previously thought, he is just a kid growing up in a time when being unkind and brash is the only thing taught to these young men. Tom Sawyer is not an unkind young man. He was raised in a time when masculinity and brashness were key characteristics that made a well-rounded man. Trying his best to balance being a child and growing into the shoes of a man must have been a hard task to handle. In summary, Tom Sawyer is a stubborn, but adventurous, young man with a conservative mind- one shaped by the household we can assume he grew up within. He has a loyalty to his friend, but remains strong-willed and mischievous.

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170

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Huck Finn’s Illustration of Kind Behavior

March 18, 2021 by Essay Writer

Within Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Tom Sawyer novel, Huckleberry Finn illustrates kind behavior. To this end, Finn treats Uncle Jake like he would treat a fellow White individual. Moreover, Finn is sorry for Muff Potter who is wrongly accused of murdering Dr. Robinson. Further, upon learning of Injun Joe’s planned attack against Mrs. Douglas, Finn seeks help from the Welshman. This essay highlights Finn’s kindness within The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by analyzing the following behaviors: Finn treats Uncle Jake like he would treat a fellow White individual; Finn is sorry for Potter who is wrongly accused of murdering Dr. Robinson; and Finn seeks the help of the Welshman after discovering that Joe plans to attack Mrs. Douglas.

To illustrate his kind personality, Finn treats an African American man named Uncle Jake like he would treat a fellow White individual. In this regard, Finn refrains from acting as though he is superior to Uncle Jake. This is crucial because Finn is a White American young man and thus enjoys the high social status ascribed to White people. Finn nevertheless disregards this ideology of entitlement and treats Uncle Jake like he would treat a fellow White American individual. For instance, Finn at one time shares a meal with Uncle Jake (Twain, n.d.). Through his indiscriminating stance while interacting with Uncle Jake, Finn illustrates his (Finn’s) kindness. Such kindness prompts Finn to desist from treating Uncle Jake as an inferior individual. In Finn’s understanding, if he is treated as an inferior individual, Uncle Jake would be hurt. Given that Finn avoids hurting Uncle Jake and thus treats him (Uncle Jake) as an equal individual, it is clear that Finn is kind.

Considering that Finn is sorry for Potter who is wrongly accused of murdering Dr. Robinson, Finn is further a kind character. On this note, Finn secretly watches as Injun Joe murders Dr. Robinson. Finn also watches as Joe shrewdly blames Potter for this murder. When Potter is arrested, detained, and prosecuted for this murder, Finn is sorry for Potter. To illustrate his regretful status, Finn offers various types of assistance to the detained Potter (Ibid.). Through this conduct, Finn illustrates his kind personality. Thanks to his kindness, Finn is pitiful about Potter’s wrongful accusation, detention, and prosecution. If he were not kind, Finn would not feel sorry for Potter.

Finn further illustrates his kindness by seeking the help of the Welshman after discovering that Joe plans to attack Mrs. Douglas. In this regard, Finn secretly overhears Joe explaining his plans of attacking Mrs. Douglas’ house. Fearing for Mrs. Douglas, Finn rushes to the house of the Welshman and reports Joe’s evil plan. This way, Finn causes the Welshman to come to Mrs. Douglas’ rescue. The Welshman thus helps in repulsing Joe, thus foiling Joe’s planned attack (Ibid.). While appraising this scenario, it is instructive to bear in mind that Finn helps to protect Mrs. Douglas from harm. It is also possible that Finn’s intervention saves Mrs. Douglas from being killed by Joe. In this regard, Finn highlights his kindness. Such kindness propels Finn to take action and save Mrs. Douglas. If he were not kind, Finn would not intervene to ensure Mrs. Douglas is not harmed by Joe.

In conclusion, within The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Finn illustrates kindness in several ways. For instance, Finn treats Uncle Jake like he would treat a fellow White individual. In addition, Finn is sorry for Potter who is wrongly accused of murdering Dr. Robinson. Further, Finn seeks the help of the Welshman after discovering that Joe plans to attack Mrs. Douglas. It would be insightful to find out why Twain uses Finn to explore the theme of kindness.

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258

The Use Of Satire And Allusions in Mark Twain’s Novel “The Adventures Of Tom Sawyer”

March 18, 2021 by Essay Writer

The huge allusion in the book has to be freedom. Freedom is something that Jim obviously wants and Huck, a white boy who is not raised correctly, wants to get away from his drunken father and all of the proper manners and speaking properly like he is expected to. In the beginning of the book and in the end Huck believes that Tom Sawyer has it all figured out because of his education. After Huck had ran away the first time Tom told him to come back and join his group of robbers. That gang falls apart in about a month. Huck doesn’t have a great attention span because of the fact that the Widow tries to teach him about Moses, but he loses interest when he realizes that Moses is dead. When he is fed up with it he just runs away from it. Huck was a boy who loved to pull practical jokes and to try and trick people just like he did in chapter two with Jim’s hat. Due to the fact that Jim is an uneducated slave he thinks that a witch came through and did but it was just Tom and Huck being mean. Tom is a terrible role model for Huck but Huck blindly does whatever Tom want and forgets about anything he learns o his adventures with Jim. Huck battles with the fact that he has to decide between social justice or as his widow tells him going to hell.

Throughout the book the Mississippi river is portrayed as being the perfect place to be, especially for Jim and Huck, to them it is the allusion of freedom and that raft represents the home full of safety. Some satire in the book happened when they get lost in the fog, Huck plays a trick on Jim and he takes it very seriously then Huck realizes that Jim cares about him he feels bad but he knows he should not feel bad, because of the way society is and the way they view slaves. So while Huck may feel bad he still has this internal conflict that he has to battle through all the time when he is with Jim. There is the thing that society thinks is right and that would be to turn Jim in but he made an actual connection with Jim throughout the book. Jim changed him, Huck is just a confused little boy who just needs to be steered in the right direction. Like for example whenever Tom pops up Huck turns right back into his former self, which would be tricking people he cared about and other things like that.

The river symbolizes a peaceful place for the author because of how he loved to steamboat in the Mississippi River while this seems like a minor detail in the life of the writer but it actually plays a huge role in the book. The river to Huck and Jim represents this place where they can’t be caught where they are no longer scared to be alive on the run. They seemed to love being on the island because in the book both characters agree that they love living on this island but it was simply way to close to civilization. They would have gotten caught if they had stayed there. When Huck fakes his own death he is finally in a peaceful part of his life but when the boat goes by and he sees that they are throwing very high quality bread he feels bad that he has upset some of his elders. Then he meets Jim right there on the island and Jim explains his situation and why he ran away. Jim throughout the book acts almost like a father figure to Huck because he teaches him and protects. Interestingly Huck has to pretend to be a girl in order to get information on land without being caught. But he is terrible at being a girl and fails miserably he even forgot to do the voice. He gives the lady a fake name and occupation he does not get into any trouble. Along their raft ride they feel that it was wrong to steal so they let some stuff go. If society had treated them so awfully that they had to run away, then why do they feel bad about stealing?

Huck behind Jim’s back goes and explores a wrecked steamboat and he finds robbers there and he tries to do the right thing by telling Jim we need to stop them. Then Jim says something even worse their raft had broken loose and floated away. So they end up stealing the robber’s boat with some of the stuff the robbers stole and once again Huck feels bad for leaving the robbers stranded. He even goes on land and convinces someone to go looking for them and he felt good about doing that good deed. It shows growth in Huck’s character from a little childish boy to a more caring slightly less childish boy. It would not be long before Huck turned back into a childish trickster again. When he tried to convince Jim that him floating away from Huck was all a dream when it actually happened in real life. Jim gets mad at Huck for making a fool out of. This would be a use of satire by the author because of the way that it ashamed the Huck for making Jim worried about not finding Huck again. Huck does apologize for his mistake.

Now the time has come where Huck must listen to what everyone else has told or listen to Jim ad help him escape. Huck knows that according to Miss Watson he would go to hell for helping a slave run away. Huck was about to give Jim up until Jim said that Huck was his only friend. But Huck lies to the guards and they end up giving Huck 40 dollars in gold once again Huck feels bad but does nothing about it this time because he knew he saved Jim. Huck and Jim end up getting split up but when Huck gets on shore he is surrounded by dogs and immediately a man calls them off and introduces himself. He is interrogated basically then taken in to the household. Huck gets very scared of the feud that these two families have with each other imagine having to bring a rifle to church just so that the other family will not kill your entire family now that is scary. Huck and Jim end up reuniting and continue their adventure along the river. Now Jim is captured and Tom is trying to make this elaborate stupid plan and of course Huck just seems to be following along just like normal whenever Tom is around Huck has to play dumb and just do whatever Tom says. It is ironic how Huck fails to listen to the actual good person and plays tricks on him. But with Tom it is almost like he is trying to fit in with the rest of the group. He is trying to be cool trying to fit in with society but to be perfectly honest society was not that great back then and Huck was very close to realizing that slavery was wrong and that he should join their side instead of turning them in. He knows that but Tom ruins him consistently. While Jim brings out this other side of Huck the one that the reader wants to see more of the one reader wants to wrap this book up correctly. Tom, Huck, and Jim return, in many ways, to what they played at the beginning of the novel. Tom once again gets caught up in his romantic ideas of amazingly rescuing Jim, which, though funny, are annoying when we see how long they delay Jim’s escape. He gets so involved in his imagination that he and Huck almost forget why they are going through so much trouble. Huck, for his part, returns to the same follower status in relation to Tom that he held at the beginning of the novel. Normally the voice of reason and conscience in his dealings with Tom, he seems to have totally forgotten his principles and his friendship with Jim. Both Tom and Huck get so in to their game that they seem to forget that slave are human beings. To them, he becomes almost an object or a prop, to the extent that they even ask him in all seriousness to share his quarters with snakes and rats. Imprisoned in the shed, Jim is just as captive and powerless as he was before he originally escaped there is nothing he can do but hope that Huck and Tom’s game works out.

All in all, the author uses satire and allusions to entice the reader and get them to think about this book on another level. To try and make the reader think.

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301

The Key Concepts of Loyalty and Friendship in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, a Novel by Mark Twain

December 9, 2020 by Essay Writer

Analysis on ‘The Adventures of Tom Sawyer’

In the Adventures of Tom Sawyer written by Mark Twain, friendship and loyalty are concepts that are important in the lives of humans. In this novel, Tom makes new friends and new experiences. However, he especially treasures the bonds that he has with Huckleberry Finn and Becky Thatcher. With Huckleberry Finn, the author, Mark Twain shows how simple adventures, blood oaths and more can bring two people close together. Also, Twain illustrates how meaningful the feeling of love can be and how loyal Tom and Becky must be to build a relationship that will last for a long time. Therefore, the theme of this book is friendship and loyalty and can be recognized through many scenes and characters in this book.

One of the strongest points of friendship and loyalty between Tom and Huck is portrayed in the scene where the friends make a blood oath. Their friendship blossomed when they began sharing various superstitions that could cure warts. One particular superstition which they spoke about was entering a graveyard with a dead cat at midnight. According to Huck, eventually the “Devil follow corpse, cat follow devil, warts follow cat.” This led them to the scene where they entered the graveyard to try and put this superstition to the test and ended up witnessing the murder of Doctor Robinson. Later, they managed to escape the place they were in and forged a blood oath to keep mum or quiet about this unfortunate incident. “Now look-a-here, Tom, less take and swear to one another- that’s what we got to do- swear to keep mum.” “but there orter be writing ‘bout a big thing like this. And blood.” Here in these two quotes from the text, one could understand that the two friends exchanged much trust and loyalty to believe that each of them would keep mum about this dangerous murder after a blood oath. Therefore, the heights of friendship and loyalty between Tom and Huck could be understood well in this chapter.

Friendship and loyalty between Tom and Huck is also demonstrated when the two friends decide to run away from home on another adventure to Jackson’s Island. One night, Tom decides to return home and check on how his family members, Aunt Polly, Mary and Sid are coping. While he is hiding under the bed at home, Tom finds out that there will be a funeral for Huck, Joe and himself on a Saturday afternoon. As a result, on a Saturday afternoon, there was rustling in the gallery and the church door opened slightly; Tom, Huck and Joe had returned. Everyone was eccentric and Aunt Polly, Mary and the Harpers began to welcome Tom and Joe with warm hugs and kisses. Meanwhile, Huck was looked upon with many unwelcoming eyes and began to uncomfortably move away from the present situation. At this moment, Tom said, “Aunt Polly, it ain’t fair. Somebody’s got to be glad to see Huck.” He understood how Huck was feeling left out. When Tom stood up for Huck, their true friendship and loyalty were proved yet again. As a result, Huck was welcomed as well and also received Aunt Polly’s loving attention. Therefore, there was true friendship and loyalty that Tom felt towards Huck deep down in his heart.

Mark Twain also exhibits the friendship and loyalty between Tom and Becky. He first begins his conversation with Becky Thatcher when he is punished for playing hooky and is asked to sit next to her. Eventually, he admits that he loves her and becomes engaged to her. However, their relationship comes to an abrupt end, and as a result they make many attempts to make each other feel jealous by being with friends who are from the opposite genders. Later, they make up and go to an island together where they become lost. “Becky cried, and Tom tried to think of some way of comforting her.” Here, one can understand that Tom tries his best to support and look out for Becky. He was also willing to drown his fear in love in order to help his one and only Becky feel better. Also, “Tom said they must go softly and listen for dripping water- they must find a spring.” This example displayed the leadership that Tom wanted to show towards the suffering Becky. Overall, the friendship and loyalty of Tom and Becky were well illustrated in these chapters, truly and meaningfully.

In conclusion, Mark Twain successfully illustrated the theme of friendship and loyalty in this book. The friendship of Tom and Huck was exceptional and profound. They were willing to support each other in every situation and trust each other 100%. Additionally, whereas the friendship between Tom and Becky was rocky in the beginning, it improved gradually as they spent more time together. In fact, Tom was able to become mature enough to look after Becky and show loyalty to her all the way on the island when they were lost. Therefore, in the book, The adventures of Tom Sawyer, the author, Mark Twain was able to effectively display the importance of friendship and loyalty in a person’s life and how special it can make someone feel.

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Discussion On Whether Tom Sawyer Has Gone Too Far In The Adventures Of Tom Sawyer

December 9, 2020 by Essay Writer

Even though Tom Sawyer is just a young boy in the chapter “Here a Captive Heart Busted,” his actions cross the boundary of child’s play and enter into the boundaries of wrongdoing. This comical, yet tedious chapter in Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn gives insight into a main point of the novel, that Jim is a human being just like the whites and deserves to be treated like one. At this pre-Civil war time, most people conceive slaves to be sub-human, or half-human, which allows them clear consciences to sell and use them for labor. Needless to say, slaves were not allowed to escape. Runaway slaves like Jim were not sympathized as humans claiming freedom, but chastised for stealing property from their masters. Twain challenges us in this view, and uses the simple hearted Huck Finn to recognize human characteristics in him like love, kindness, and loyalty. After many chapters of this metamorphosis in Huck’s mind, Tom Sawyer enters the story. The way he treats Jim stands in sharp contrast to Huck’s way, and his absurd demands cause the reader to become exasperated. An evaluation of specific details leads us into a better understanding of Twain’s racial beliefs.

In the “Captive Heart” chapter, Tom demands Jim to do ten ridiculous tasks: each task originates in Tom’s notion that Jim must perform the role of an adventurous prisoner. These tasks are so ludicrous that even Huck has a hard time seeing the point. They are tediously described as “the work and bother of raising the mullen, and jew’s-harping the rats, and petting and flattering up the snakes and spiders and things, on top of all the other work he had to on pens, and inscriptions, and journals, and things, which made it more trouble and responsibility to be a prisoner than anything [Jim] ever undertook” (254). One of Tom’s ideas is for Jim to write out a lengthy inscription explaining the woes of a prisoner on the side of the “prison” walls. Yet, Tom rejects the log walls because “they don’t have log walls in a dungeon: we got to dig the inscriptions in a rock” (249). Comically, the grindstone they choose is too heavy for the two boys to carry all the way that Jim has to slide out of his chain, walk out into the field, and carry it back with Huck. That the prisoner temporarily frees himself in order to fulfill conditions to be free is ironic, and it reveals that Tom regards Jim’s freedom as a game; unfortunately, Jim does not feel this way, his escape is a matter of rights, freedom, and his life. Tom and Jim’s different priorities create a conflict that pulls the readers to desire Tom to stop handling Jim’s life so haphazardly.

Another instance where Tom’s absurd notions are fulfilled at Jim’s expense occurs when Tom demands that Jim have a rattlesnake for a dumb pet. Tom expects Jim to tame it and pet it so that it will love Jim and follow him around everywhere. Scared for his life, Jim pleads, “Please Mars Tom doan’ talk so! I can’ stan’ it!” (251). Tom replies, “Jim, don’t act so foolish. A prisoner’s got to have some kind of a dumb pet [?] there’s more glory to be gained in your being the first to ever try it than any other way you could ever think of to save your life” (251). Again, a conflict arises between Tom and Jim’s priorities; Whereas Tom is playing a game, Jim is negotiating his life and freedom. The structure Twain uses here causes readers to protest that it does not matter if Jim gains any glory by being a pretend prisoner. Instead, readers are encouraged to sympathize with him and want him to become free. Furthermore, it is clear that Jim is not the fool, but rather Tom. Yet, because Jim is a slave, he must submit to any whimsical idea Tom may have because he is white. Through such interactions, Twain leads readers to recognize a great injustice in slavery.

There is only so much nonsense that Jim can take. Every preposterous new idea adds to his frustration. He finds “so much fault with [having an onion sent to him in his coffee], and with the work and bother of raising the mulllen, and jew’s harping the rats, and petting and flattering up the snakes and spiders and things, on top of al the other work he had to do on pens, and inscriptions, and journals, and things, which made it more trouble and worry and responsibility to be a prisoner than anything he ever undertook, that Tom most lost all patience with him” (254). Here, Jim’s complaints can be understood and forgiven because they are so acceptable. Although Jim should have the right to protest these ridiculous ideas, Tom loses patience with Jim the one who thinks with reason and clarity. He counters that Jim “was just loadened down with more gaudier chances than a prisoner ever had in the world to make a name for himself, and yet he didn’t know enough to appreciate them, and they was just about wasted on him. So Jim he was sorry, and said he wouldn’t behave so no more [?]” (254). Readers are allowed to witness a sensible adult man under the controls of a silly young boy. Readers can sympathize that Jim is forced to try to make a name for himself as a prisoner, when all he wants to do is be free and be united with his family. He is even forced to appease his white friend by apologizing that he is behaving wrongly. Such a humble admission causes Jim’s character to be viewed as noble and friendly. No doubt, Twain forms these details to comment that Jim is a human who is capable of thinking and making decisions. Readers are made to feel that it is an injustice for Jim to be subject to Tom’s whims.

Chapter thirty-eight of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn elaborately depicts the schemes of a young boy to create a fanciful adventure about a captive prisoner. As charming as this plot is, it loses its fun when the prisoner turns out to be a real slave. Tom’s attempts at fun are so out of place that readers become frustrated that Jim is forced to perform such stupid and unnecessary tasks. Tom’s requests and attitude show that he does not take Jim seriously as a human being. This attitude contrasts to that of Huck who has learned to value Jim through the relationship he formed with Jim on the river. Mark Twain fashions these details to infuriate readers at the injustice of slavery and challenges them to regard former slaves as whole human beings. To treat them negligibly is to be as outlandish as Tom Sawyer.

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336

The Adventure of Tom Sawyer

December 9, 2020 by Essay Writer

An imaginative and mischievous boy named Tom Sawyer lives with his Aunt Polly and his half-brother, Sid, in the Mississippi River town of St. Petersburg, Missouri. After playing hooky from school on Friday and dirtying his clothes in a fight, Tom is made to whitewash the fence as punishment on Saturday. At first, Tom is disappointed by having to forfeit his day off. However, he soon cleverly persuades his friends to trade him small treasures for the privilege of doing his work. He trades these treasures for tickets given out in Sunday school for memorizing Bible verses and uses the tickets to claim a Bible as a prize. He loses much of his glory, however, when, in response to a question to show off his knowledge, he incorrectly answers that the first two disciples were David and Goliath.

Tom falls in love with Becky Thatcher, a new girl in town, and persuades her to get “engaged” to him. Their romance collapses when she learns that Tom has been “engaged” before—to a girl named Amy Lawrence. Shortly after being shunned by Becky, Tom accompanies Huckleberry Finn, the son of the town drunk, to the graveyard at night to try out a “cure” for warts. At the graveyard, they witness the murder of young Dr. Robinson by the Native-American “half-breed” Injun Joe. Scared, Tom and Huck run away and swear a blood oath not to tell anyone what they have seen. Injun Joe blames his companion, Muff Potter, a hapless drunk, for the crime. Potter is wrongfully arrested, and Tom’s anxiety and guilt begin to grow. Tom, Huck, and Tom’s friend Joe Harper run away to an island to become pirates. While frolicking around and enjoying their newfound freedom, the boys become aware that the community is sounding the river for their bodies. Tom sneaks back home one night to observe the commotion. After a brief moment of remorse at the suffering of his loved ones, Tom is struck by the idea of appearing at his funeral and surprising everyone. He persuades Joe and Huck to do the same. Their return is met with great rejoicing, and they become the envy and admiration of all their friends.

Back in school, Tom gets himself back in Becky’s favor after he nobly accepts the blame for a book that she has ripped. Soon Muff Potter’s trial begins, and Tom, overcome by guilt, testifies against Injun Joe. Potter is acquitted, but Injun Joe flees the courtroom through a window. Summer arrives, and Tom and Huck go hunting for buried treasure in a haunted house. After venturing upstairs they hear a noise below. Peering through holes in the floor, they see Injun Joe enter the house disguised as a deaf and mute Spaniard. He and his companion, an unkempt man, plan to bury some stolen treasure of their own. From their hiding spot, Tom and Huck wriggle with delight at the prospect of digging it up. By an amazing coincidence, Injun Joe and his partner find a buried box of gold themselves. When they see Tom and Huck’s tools, they become suspicious that someone is sharing their hiding place and carry the gold off instead of reburying it.

Huck begins to shadow Injun Joe every night, watching for an opportunity to nab the gold. Meanwhile, Tom goes on a picnic to McDougal’s Cave with Becky and their classmates. That same night, Huck sees Injun Joe and his partner making off with a box. He follows and overhears their plans to attack the Widow Douglas, a kind resident of St. Petersburg. By running to fetch help, Huck forestalls the violence and becomes an anonymous hero. Tom and Becky get lost in the cave, and their absence is not discovered until the following morning. The men of the town begin to search for them, but to no avail. Tom and Becky run out of food and candles and begin to weaken. The horror of the situation increases when Tom, looking for a way out of the cave, happens upon Injun Joe, who is using the cave as a hideout. Eventually, just as the searchers are giving up, Tom finds a way out. The town celebrates, and Becky’s father, Judge Thatcher, locks up the cave. Injun Joe, trapped inside, starves to death. A week later, Tom takes Huck to the cave and they find the box of gold, the proceeds of which are invested for them. The Widow Douglas adopts Huck, and, when Huck attempts to escape civilized life, Tom promises him that if he returns to the widow, he can join Tom’s robber band. Reluctantly, Huck agrees.

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202

Essay of The adventure of Tom Sawyer

December 9, 2020 by Essay Writer

Tom Sawyer lived with his Aunt Polly and his half-brother, Sid. Tom dirties his clothes in a fight and is made to whitewash the fence the next day, as a punishment. He cleverly persuades his friends to trade him small treasures for the privilege of doing his work. He trades the treasures for Sunday School tickets which one normally receives for memorizing scriptures, redeeming them for a bible, much to the surprise and bewilderment of the superintendent who thought “it was simply preposterous that this boy had warehoused two thousand sheaves of Scriptural wisdom on his premises—a dozen would strain his capacity, without a doubt”. Tom falls in love with Becky Thatcher, a new girl in town, and persuades her to get “engaged” by kissing him.

But their romance collapses when she learns Tom has been “engaged” previously, to a girl named Amy Lawrence. Shortly after being shunned by Becky, Tom accompanies Huckleberry Finn to the graveyard at night, where they witness the murder of Dr. Robinson. Tom, Huck, and Joe Harper run away to an island. While enjoying their new-found freedom, the boys become aware that the community is sounding the river for their bodies.

Tom sneaks back home one night to observe the commotion. After a brief moment of remorse at his loved ones’ suffering, Tom is struck by the idea of appearing at his own funeral. Back in school, Tom gets himself back in Becky’s favor after he nobly accepts the blame for a book she has ripped. Soon, Muff Potter’s trial begins, in which Tom testifies against Injun Joe. Potter is acquitted, but Injun Joe flees the courtroom through a window. Tom then begins to fear for his life as Injun Joe is at large and can easily find him. Summer arrives, and Tom and Huck go hunting for buried treasure in a haunted house. After venturing upstairs, they hear a noise below.

Peering through holes in the floor, they see Injun Joe disguised as a deaf-mute Spaniard; Injun Joe and his companion plan to bury some stolen treasure of their own. From their hiding spot, Tom and Huck wriggle with delight at the prospect of digging it up. Huck begins to shadow Injun Joe nightly, watching for an opportunity to nab the gold. Meanwhile, Tom goes on a picnic to McDougal’s Cave with Becky and their classmates. In his overconfidence, Tom strays off the marked paths with Becky and they get hopelessly lost. That same night, Huck sees Injun Joe and his partner making off with a box. He follows and overhears their plans to attack the Widow Douglas. By running to fetch help, Huck prevents the crime and becomes an anonymous hero. As Tom and Becky wander the extensive cave complex for the next few days, Tom one day accidentally encounters Injun Joe, although the boy is not seen by his nemesis. Eventually, he finds a way out, and the two children are joyfully welcomed back by their community.

As a preventive measure, Judge Thatcher has McDougal’s Cave sealed off, but this traps Injun Joe inside. When Tom hears of the sealing several days later and directs a posse to the cave, they find the corpse of Joe just inside the sealed entrance, starved to death. A week later, having deduced on Injun Joe’s presence at McDougal’s Cave that the villain must have hidden the stolen gold inside, Tom takes Huck to the cave and they find the box of gold, the proceeds of which are invested for them. The Widow Douglas adopts Huck, and, when Huck attempts to escape civilized life, Tom tricks him into thinking if Huck returns to the widow, he can join Tom’s robber band. Reluctantly, Huck agrees and goes back to the Widow Douglas.

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