Roosevelt’s Camapign for Japanese Americans Essay

October 14, 2020 by Essay Writer

Introduction

The history of Japanese in the United States of America is overwhelmed with events of internment and imprisonment in camps. Once President Roosevelt had occupied the main position in the American government, he issued an announcement that ordered to free all representatives of the Asian nation from internment camps in the territory of the USA. The following paper is intended to discuss and analyze the primary source that proves these actions of Franklin Roosevelt in 1943. Once President Franklin evaluated the situation of World War II with Japanese who were deprived of their freedom rights and dignities by American military forces, he decided to announce to free all the people of Asian ethnic background in his country in 1943, which is now used as a credible primary source in discussions of contemporary history.

Observation

The format of the primary source called “FR Says Loyal Japanese to Be Freed” is an extraction from a newspaper (not identified) that was issued in 1943. This piece of literature presents President Roosevelt’s announcement regarding the resolution he made to free all the Japanese from American internment camps. The text consists of summarization and quotations of Mr. Roosevelt’s statements. The words “Americans of Japanese ancestry who are loyal to this country will be permitted to work in normal homes and jobs”1 attracted my attention the most.

Evaluation

The author of the discussed primary source is not stated, although he or she quoted Franklin Roosevelt and was published by one of the American newspapers in 1943. The creator of the article did not have any bias, based on who this person was and the period when he or she was writing. However, as the author wrote for regular citizens, they had to compose the text according to the popular style. The context in which the source was produced was about World War II, multiple violations of Japanese people’s rights, and their lives in internment camps2.

Analysis

The significance of the discussed source is tremendous because it played a major role in the lives of American Japanese – all people had a chance to know that the representatives of the Asian nation were finally free.3 This fact is considered to be both unique and important for contemporary people as it tells them how the US government treated Japanese in the 20th century.4 The country’s population should care about this historical event to develop respect and understand the price of freedom that every race had paid for it.5 From President Roosevelt’s announcement, I learned that he was concerned with the problems of Japanese at internment camps. Such a kind and compassionate relation cannot be learned from any other source.

Question

I still have one question about the moment of World War II in history: “What made white people think that they were the supreme race?” I do not have any questions to the author of the article discussed in the paper. It would also be interesting to understand how these events influenced relations among modern Americans and Japanese.

Conclusion

President Roosevelt’s words regarding making Japanese from American internment camps free were rephrased and quoted by an unknown author and published in the newspaper issued in 1943. This announcement became crucial for the representatives of the Asian nation in the USA. This source can be claimed important for all Americans as it shows them the significance of the moment and Franklin Roosevelt’s relation to his citizens.

Bibliography

Curley, John. “In All Fairness- Are They Loyal?” University of La Verne Archives and Special Collections, 1943. Web.

Fellowship of Reconciliation. “Evacuation! A Selected Bibliography on the Japanese Evacuation.” University of La Verne Archives and Special Collections, 1943. Web.

“FR Says Loyal Japanese to Be Freed.” University of La Verne Archives and Special Collections, 1943. Web.

The Commission on World Peace. “For Interracial Tolerance.” University of La Verne Archives and Special Collections, 1944. Web.

War Relocation Authority. “First Quarterly Report.” University of La Verne Archives and Special Collections, 1942. Web.

Footnotes

  1. “FR Says Loyal Japanese to Be Freed,” University of La Verne Archives and Special Collections, September 15, 1943, Web.
  2. War Relocation Authority, “First Quarterly Report,” University of La Verne Archives and Special Collections, 1942,Web.
  3. Fellowship of Reconciliation, “Evacuation! A Selected Bibliography on the Japanese Evacuation,” University of La Verne Archives and Special Collections, 1943, Web.
  4. The Commission on World Peace, “For Interracial Tolerance,” University of La Verne Archives and Special Collections, 1944, Web.
  5. John Curley, “In All Fairness- Are They Loyal?” University of La Verne Archives and Special Collections 1943, Web.
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