Merchant of Venice Essay

April 24, 2020 by Essay Writer

Introduction

Shakespeare uses many vivid methods to create anxiety of the audience; he also uses staged irony and other skills to engage the audience in the play, Merchant of Venice. The ways that Shakespeare uses would have been suitable for an Elizabeth audience or a modern audience too since the atmosphere and initiatives are passed across. Shakespeare uses two different settings for The Merchant of Venice, Venice and Belmont (Turner, Antonio, et al., p.29).

This paper will discuss the techniques that Shakespeare uses to communicate his message to the audience and how he makes the play seem real by the use of setting. In Shakespeare’s time, Venice is a capital where wealth streams; it is also a multinational city at the border of Christendom. Belmont, alternatively, is the residence of Portia and her baffling casket. Romance and festivity dwell here, and at the end of the play, the victorious Christians end up here. Belmont is viewed through rose-tinted glasses as a green world that is taken away from the ruthlessness of the actual humanity, unlike Venice, which is controlled by women (Turner, Antonio, et al., p.29). The way in which the audience is introduced to the world of Venice in the first scene is how the people of Venice are concerned with wealth and trade, which reflects the outlook the Shakespearean viewers, would have had at the time. The language used by Solanio, Solarino and Antonio dominates the subject of business. The style of writing used in Venice and Belmont differs as used by Shakespeare. “But what warmth is there in your affection towards any of these princely suitors” with the concern of Venice, the statement stresses more on love than riches. Bassanio describes Portia regarding wealth when he says ‘?a lady richly left’. In Venice, Antonio gives Bassanio a loan as an expression of his deep friendship, but in Belmont, love converses openly. Shakespeare uses Shylock in a character that is very compelling, and this makes Shylock seem to be dominating the play and too broad. He is dramatic in his way of bringing out his message to the spectators. When he is cruel, he is terrifying; he becomes kind and turns Venetian society’s traditions on themselves (Blagys, Michael p.43). Shylock is pitiable and compassionate at times, he is handled harshly in Venice and has witnessed his daughter escape with a man who despises him. Shakespeare has used comedy in the final act to teach a different message to the people. Shakespeare has used Shylock’s character pleasing and obscure, and this makes him seem to be the only impressive figure in the play. Shylock’s scenes are clutch and captivating, and many detractors believe, the book goes down whenever he exists (Blagys, Michael p.43). The Merchant of Venice contains all the elements of a Shakespearean comedy, but it is repeatedly surpassed by Shylock’s character and his pursuit for a pummel of flesh. Shylock is presented as a disgraceful man who has lost his daughter but is filled with greed. Suddenly the light language of the comedic session disappears for all scenes at a time, and Antonio’s fortune is more anticipative than funny. The last act converts the play’s state to be a comedy, mounding on the essential humor and providence, but what is left is gloomed by the fact that Antonio might pay Bassanio’s debt with his life. Reality is emphasized in the book; Bassanio uses his appearances to electrify both the Venetian people and Portia from Belmont. The book brings out presentations because Bassanio accentuates his look his whole life. He is after wealthy so that he may earn an excellent reputation in Venice. By Bassanio saying “It is not unknown to you, Antonio how much have I disabled mine estate” (Act I, Scene 1, lines 122-125) that is a confession he makes of him using his money so that everyone can like him. Bassanio uses his manifestation in Belmont to impress Portia; he makes Portia believe that he has wealth and is striking so that she would crave having him for a husband and assist then she would help him induce his debts. For instance, when Bassanio says, “I have a mind presages me such thrift that I should questionless be fortunate” (Act I, Scene 1, lines 173-176). Shylock deceives everyone by making them believe he is something he is not; he seemed charitable and bighearted. For example, when he says “I would be friends with you and have your love forget the shames that you have stained me supply your present wants and take no do it” (Act I, Scene 3, lines 135-139) he seems as assisting Bassanio and Antonio when he offers money to them, and they take a loan from him. Portia swindles her suitors and the people of Venice; she creates an impression that she is into them. Like she says, “yourself, renown prince then stood as unfair like any comer, I have looked on yet (Act II, Scene 1, lines 20-23) her choice of lexis seems to be saying that the prince will win her love. In conclusion, Shakespeare has well conveyed his message to the audience and has used features, which make the play seem to be real. By the use of two different settings, he has shown how people have ideological differences in the world. The book puts the audience in suspense and in a comedic mood.

References

Blagys, Michael. “A Lighting Design Concept for the Lighting for William Shakespeare’s: The Merchant of Venice.” (2015). Turner, Antonio Jo, et al. “THE MERCHANT OF VENICE 2017: COMPANY LIST.” (2017).

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