“Eveline” a Short Story by James Joyce Essay

July 16, 2021 by Essay Writer

Updated: Aug 29th, 2020

James Joyce cites that, Eveline Hill is a young woman who is around nineteen years. She sits alongside her window as she waits to leave her place of residence. During this time, she recalls many things surrounding her life that are making or driving her from home. Both her mother, Mrs. Smith, and elder brother, Earnest are dead while the other brother spends most of his time away from home in his church decorating business.

She remembers how Mr. Smith, their father, mistreated her brothers. The story unveils that Eveline had limited loyalty towards the work that she used to do. A brief overview of the story shows that, even though Eveline falls for Frank who is a sailor, she does not accompany him to Buenos Aires just as promised (Joyce 3). This paper will seek to give a critique of Wendy Dennison’s student paper.

Upon reading Wendy Dennison’s paper, it is observable that her paper is strong. To some extent, the reader understands that Wendy’s work possesses a huge grip of expressing ideas, which in turn gives satisfaction. Wendy’s paper has an analysis of the audience that makes it possible for easy message delivery (4). For instance, the paper does not contain difficult words such as protean and epitome. As such, the paper is strong because the choice of words is appropriate and the plot shares qualities of writing that are apparent to fellow classmates as well as the instructor. Additionally, having seen that Wendy knows about “Eveline”, it is truthful to say that she has carried out prewriting exercise.

Literature studies indicate that a strong paper must have a prewriting exercise. Therefore, in this case, Wendy’s paper contains argumentative tactics, valuable word choice, and attitude, which explains more about Eveline’s essential timidity, self-doubt, insecurity, and capacity for her self-deception.

On the other hand, Wendy’s paper needs a bit of polishing because literature writing and understanding involves learning the questions relevant to ask yourself as you write or read. In order to deepen comprehension, the writer or reader must examine and think critically about the components of the work. In this context, critical means the overarching evaluation, synthesis, and inference as well as analysis of all the discerning inquisitions and thoughts (5).

Agreeably, the composition of Wendy’s paper provides unclear inference regarding the implications of certain elements such as tone, structure, and characterization of Eveline’s story. Thus, it is agreeable that Wendy’s paper requires some polishing in order to bring out clarification on synthesis and analysis as well as inference of the plot. Additionally, the discovery and development of ideas bring a sense of obviousness (6). A proper paper must give suspense, which in turn brings about a process of discovering ideas called invention. Inadequate employment of invention is one of the reasons as to why Wendy’s paper needs polishing.

Conclusion

In conclusion, James wrote an enjoyable story about teenage thoughts. He brought out feelings and emotions that cluster many youngsters’ minds. For example, when Eveline heard a bell clang upon her heart, a feeling ran through her heart and she heard Frank say, “come” repeatedly. Arguably, Wendy’s paper is strong as it has some citations quoted directly from James Joyce’s Eveline story. “Look lively” is a quote that urges Miss Hill to loosen up and appear bold in her work (7). Given the fact that Wendy’s paper includes directed freewriting, it becomes solemn to give corrections. This provides room for enhancements.

Works Cited

Joyce, James. “Eveline.” Literature and the Writing Process. Ed. Elizabeth McMahan, Susan X Day, and Robert Funk. 7th ed. Upper Saddle River: Prentice, 2005. Print. 3–7.




This essay on “Eveline” a Short Story by James Joyce was written and submitted by your fellow student. You are free to use it for research and reference purposes in order to write your own paper; however, you must cite it accordingly.

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