Introduction to Poetry

The Analysis Of The Poem “Morning Nocturne”

November 8, 2021 by Essay Writer

Morning Nocturne ( here Nocturne Refers to That precious Moment At peaceful night Music Piano Romantic Party )In this poem, the poet refers to the sudden moment where on a Lakeside at evening when the lake is just calm uninterrupted “Whitewater” with the Ice-Green (bluish green) surface, beside to lakeside the attractive group of birds just like a flock of Geese to be ideal with their head and beak covered under their wings like stones on water but always ready to move.

The poet typically specifies the environment to be cold at evening time. For instance, they are completely off track of their hope to live, but their inner rising hope and water aid them to live as the days go dark and also their feathers helps to remain them warm and get lost in same jumbled winter’s museum. Their same summer sleeping spots where they preserved their memories of their December arguments over parking tickets and consumed dinner.

The poet compares peaceful life and the lake’s iceberg as a painted alloy by the one who erases her efforts as: “ An artist in hiding, a new world not made ”. The pale faded faint rays poured through instance crumbling November moods. The poet describes here about some substantial falls, Clotho’s mythology used here to properly depict the gentle flow of life, contrasting to tangle tree shadow, heavy plunges, and compared with different objects people use in everyday life like sewing basket, fated net, straight pins, a piece of feldspar, two buttons like twins in felted womb. This comparative mythology about how people live is born to be decided and vice versa.

The Poet recount questions the geese, can they hold the stony weight, “Michelangelo” the remarkable artist of the statue of David and the mural on the ceiling secrets of flight, The smell of the ooze and the child’s image holding out bread in a red hat? On our Bureau, with similarity of grey stones, Genesis of the broken piece of mountain batter round by water into small stones, Brought back to the far side of holiday sunlight, The pledged ticket retains of old guitar, Poet also states regarding the memory of an amazing memo written twenty years ago, which was perfectly sealed into the envelope but never dispatched, The awkward grown faint sketch of three soft ginkgo leaves. This was traditionally an iconic symbol of remarkable longevity and lovely piece of cultural art in Japan. This poem encloses the comparison of poets entire life experiences about up and down with golden memories just now tangled museum to go through.

Read more

How the Conflict of the Frustration of Poets Plays a Central Role in Introduction to Poetry by Billy Collins

November 8, 2021 by Essay Writer

AP English Literature and Composition

Introduction to Poetry Explication

Billy Collin’s poem, Introduction to Poetry, dramatizes conflict of poets’ frustration when their work is overanalyzed instead of being enjoyed. More specifically, this poem’s narrator stresses the author’s intent of providing open-ended messages when writing poetry while audiences fail to appreciate poetry properly, instead seeing them as intellectual burdens. This struggle is shown by the shocking personifications and imagery in the final two stanzas of “[tying] the poem to a chair with rope/and [torturing] a confession out of it… and [torturing] a confession out of it.” These highly charged descriptions show how disappointed poets become when they realize that their poetry stresses student readers in understanding the poems rather than taking time to enjoy the poems.

The first and second stanzas provide sensory imagery to reflect the variety of poetry there is in the world. By using visual imagery to note that students “hold [poems] up to the light/like a color slide” or auditory imagery like “[pressing] an ear against its hive,” the poem’s persona illustrates how subjective poems can be. Similar to how there are millions of colors, there are millions of interpretations for poems and one should be excited by all these possibilities instead of draining oneself to find the “one true meaning.” This painful but pointless search for the supposed one true meaning that literary persons prescribe is further outlined by comparing readers’ analyses to “[dropping a mouse] and watching him probe his way out.” This metaphor effectively explains how lost readers are when examining poetry. Currently, poetry is a labyrinth to many readers, which can be great for rereading and trying new options to discover new interpretations like “[feeling] the walls for a light switch” but should also be avoided because of the confusion audiences dislike. The particular usage of “switch” emphasizes how poems can change meaning and expose new details the more times one reads it.

The poem’s persona directly states their purpose for poetry by “[wanting] them [the readers] to waterski across the surface of a poem.” The diction of “waterski” demonstrates how audiences should enjoy the poem for what it is, on-the-surface like a wave, and under-the-surface like the ocean but not systemically dive deep into the ocean right away. Readers should wade through the waves for a while first and fully absorb the poem’s beauty first and then take on the fun of individualistic analysis, as highlighted by the comparison to the exciting sport of waterskiing.

The poem finally features unique structural features such as multiple short stanzas and free verse. The lack of rigid organization or adherence to a rhyme scheme may imply the freeness that poets want to express in their works, that each poem can have multiple meanings and should not be boiled down into one particular analysis, unlike how some teachers or professors would force students to “dig deeper” for meaning that was never really there. The narrator, who probably reflects Collins himself, wants to reveal that their poems are not meant to trick readers but to provide a sense of enjoyment. It is even simply feels free to skip lines so often rather than keeping the long complete sentences required by proper English grammar. All in all, this poem conveys that making effortful unnecessary reaches as to what each line means can disrespect the purpose of a poem, which is to find one’s own meaning for leisure.

Read more

Billy Collins – Introduction to Poetry and Metaphors, Imagery, and Irony

November 8, 2021 by Essay Writer

Irony in “Introduction to Poetry”

In Billy Collin’s poem “Introduction to poetry”, the speaker is assuming the role of a teacher who’s tasked with teaching poetry to unwilling students. Collins attempts to convince the audience that poetry is not such a difficult part of literature to understand, and reminds them of why it exists in the first place: for entertainment and relaxation. Collins uses metaphors and imagery throughout the poem, and adds irony to reinforce the ideal that poems shouldn’t be read only to “decode” them.

Firstly, it’s important to note what perspective Collins uses throughout the poem. The reader assumes the speaker is a teacher in school. In addition, the speaker doesn’t actually address the reader, but rather his fictitious students in class. The poem is a dialogue between teacher and students, for the purpose of teaching the reader. In this way, Collins is able to communicate his ideas with the reader without giving them explicit instructions.

However, Collins also gives many examples through the speaker using metaphors. He compares poetry to several different things throughout the length of the poem, the first of which the speaker asks the students to “hold it up to the light like a color slide” (Collins, 1988, line 3). Here, “it” refers to the poem in question. He’s encouraging readers to look for it’s true value, and appreciate the little things that might not be seen at face value. He continues, “press an ear against its hive” (Collins, 1988, line 4). In this way, Collins is acknowledging the difficulty of poetry for some students, comparing it to a beehive, with the danger of being stung. This is a metaphor for any student afraid to take a guess in fear that their answer is wrong. But at the same time, the speaker encourages his students to take that risk anyways, and explains the rewards further in the poem: “I want them to water-ski across the surface of a poem” (Collins, 1988, line 10). Here, the speaker gets to his point about what poetry ought to be. Water-skiing is a way to relax out on the lake on a nice summer day for a leisurely activity. Water-skiing is gliding across the top of the surface, and that’s exactly what Collins wants readers to do with poetry. He wants them to enjoy it at it’s face value for leisure.

Yet, the speaker continues with what his students are not supposed to do, too. He ends the poem with, “They begin beating it with a hose to find out what it really means” (Collins, 1988, line 16). This is the speaker advising students they shouldn’t read and decipher poetry just because it’s been assigned. They shouldn’t read it with the intent of finding out what it means so they can write an essay on it, but actually read the poem for enjoyment and to appreciate its value, and then the deeper truths will come naturally. This is what’s ironic about Collins’ poem. His whole goal is to convince the reader not to read just to decipher the meaning, but that’s exactly what’s required in analyzing “Introduction to Poetry.”

All in all, Collins speaks through a teacher and addresses students of poetry, trying to put them on the correct path. He feels poetry is to be enjoyed and not scrutinized, and relays this to the reader through metaphors and imagery. But at the same time, ironically delivers this meaning in a hypocritical way.

Read more

Introduction to Poetry by Billy Collins: My Own Personal Identification and Enjoyment of His Poem

November 8, 2021 by Essay Writer

Poetry Response

The poem Introduction to Poetry by Billy Collins is something that I can identify with on a personal level. Teachers often ask me to analyze poetry (especially in this class), and I don’t usually feel like I’m doing it the way that they want me too. I also really enjoyed this poem because of the vivid imagery and personification throughout. It kept the pace of the poem fast and made it really entertaining to read.

In the poem, the author describes how he would look at a poem to find its true meaning, and how he wants “them” to look at the poem he has presented to “them”. His description of his actions is very gentle and reminds me how one should treat a small child. He describes being physically gentle, but also being open-minded and learning from the poem. Then he talks about how “they” try to figure out the poem. In his description, it sounds like “they” are torturing the poem. I can identify more with the “they” in this poem than the author. I am not a huge fan of poetry and I often feel like there is a deeper meaning that I am missing. Even when someone explains a deeper meaning in a poem, I often still don’t truly understand and think that it would be much easier is we just wrote what we meant and left it at that. I think that the “they” in the poem was students of the author, which would explain even more so why I identify with them so strongly. (Also I’m sorry Mr. Bingham, you probably feel the same way that the author feels).

The imagery and personification in this poem were the main literary devices, but they were more than sufficient. Even though, as I stated above, I identify more with “them” and I think I treat poems more like “they” do, I still felt bad for the poem that was being abused and could see how the author’s method of analyzing and reading the poem was nicer and would yield a much deeper and more meaningful understanding of the poem. I really liked how the author talked about the poem like it was a person because I made it much easier to feel sorry for and care about the poem. The imagery really helped with this poem because the ideas were good, but the execution was what really made the poem memorable and interesting to read. If there had been very little imagery this poem would have been very bland and boring to read.

Overall, I liked this poem. I am not a huge fan of poetry and I often feel like it goes over my head so I identified strongly with the “they” who abused the poem. By using personification, the author was able to make the poem sympathetic. The imagery used played a large part in the poem being entertaining and not drab, as well as keeping the pace and really bringing the ideas behind the poem to life. I really liked this poem and I immediately identified with it.

Read more

The Conflict of the Frustration of Poets in Introduction to Poetry, a Poem by Billy Collins

November 8, 2021 by Essay Writer

Billy Collin’s poem, Introduction to Poetry, dramatizes conflict of poets’ frustration when their work is overanalyzed instead of being enjoyed. More specifically, this poem’s narrator stresses the author’s intent of providing open-ended messages when writing poetry while audiences fail to appreciate poetry properly, instead seeing them as intellectual burdens. This struggle is shown by the shocking personifications and imagery in the final two stanzas of “[tying] the poem to a chair with rope/and [torturing] a confession out of it… and [torturing] a confession out of it.” These highly charged descriptions show how disappointed poets become when they realize that their poetry stresses student readers in understanding the poems rather than taking time to enjoy the poems.

The first and second stanzas provide sensory imagery to reflect the variety of poetry there is in the world. By using visual imagery to note that students “hold [poems] up to the light/like a color slide” or auditory imagery like “[pressing] an ear against its hive,” the poem’s persona illustrates how subjective poems can be. Similar to how there are millions of colors, there are millions of interpretations for poems and one should be excited by all these possibilities instead of draining oneself to find the “one true meaning.” This painful but pointless search for the supposed one true meaning that literary persons prescribe is further outlined by comparing readers’ analyses to “[dropping a mouse] and watching him probe his way out.” This metaphor effectively explains how lost readers are when examining poetry. Currently, poetry is a labyrinth to many readers, which can be great for rereading and trying new options to discover new interpretations like “[feeling] the walls for a light switch” but should also be avoided because of the confusion audiences dislike. The particular usage of “switch” emphasizes how poems can change meaning and expose new details the more times one reads it.

The poem’s persona directly states their purpose for poetry by “[wanting] them [the readers] to waterski across the surface of a poem.” The diction of “waterski” demonstrates how audiences should enjoy the poem for what it is, on-the-surface like a wave, and under-the-surface like the ocean but not systemically dive deep into the ocean right away. Readers should wade through the waves for a while first and fully absorb the poem’s beauty first and then take on the fun of individualistic analysis, as highlighted by the comparison to the exciting sport of waterskiing.

The poem finally features unique structural features such as multiple short stanzas and free verse. The lack of rigid organization or adherence to a rhyme scheme may imply the freeness that poets want to express in their works, that each poem can have multiple meanings and should not be boiled down into one particular analysis, unlike how some teachers or professors would force students to “dig deeper” for meaning that was never really there. The narrator, who probably reflects Collins himself, wants to reveal that their poems are not meant to trick readers but to provide a sense of enjoyment. It is even simply feels free to skip lines so often rather than keeping the long complete sentences required by proper English grammar. All in all, this poem conveys that making effortful unnecessary reaches as to what each line means can disrespect the purpose of a poem, which is to find one’s own meaning for leisure.

Read more
Order Creative Sample Now
Choose type of discipline
Choose academic level
  • High school
  • College
  • University
  • Masters
  • PhD
Deadline

Page count
1 pages
$ 10

Price