Barack Obama’s Second Presidential Term Agenda Essay

August 17, 2021 by Essay Writer

Introduction

The 2012 presidential elections of the United States marked the presidential election of the 57th quadrennial. It occurred on the Tuesday of November 6, 2012. This is with President Barrack Obama the Democratic contender, together with Joe Biden his running mate being reelected for another term in office. Tuesday’s ballot vote represented record voter attendance in numerous regions. This is with Obama capturing 364 electoral ballots against McCain’s 162. Besides, Obama got a victory popular vote of 53 percent against his opponent’s 46 percent.

Predictions for the next four years presidential leadership

Most Americans show optimism about the next four years of the Obama regime. Nevertheless, this is with the 2008 figure dropping. Polls indicate that 54% of Americans show more optimism concerning the coming four years under the leadership of Barrack Obama. This is with 41% of them articulating that they think the performance of the nation will be worse off. In comparison to the optimism level of the historic election of 2008, 65% of the population was in support of his leadership.

Others indicate that after other ballot votes that took place sometime back there is a resemblance or exceeding the level of the state’s optimism. This is specifically in 2004 following the re-election of George W. Bush, whereby the optimism gauge ranged at 53%. Additionally, 94% of the democrats articulate that the country’s well-being will be better off indicating a majority of them being so positive about the next four years regime. However, 4% of them seem pessimistic about the subsequent four years.

On the other hand, the republicans seem to take a different viewpoint altogether. This is with 86% of them indicating that they expect everything to worsen, and 11% indicating that they have high expectations of the country performing better. Optimism by the Independents with a figure of 51% against 40% is evident.

Why the winner won the elections, and the looser lost

Superior campaign administration made Obama win the 2012 elections. This campaign can be referred to as, ‘the community organizers revenge’. This is since the majority of the tactics they used were the same that most national community organizers employed in building their ranks and spreading their message. Besides, by using the internet, Obama was able to engage with the youth who mark a majority of votes thus, could able to answer all the questions that they had, all through the campaign. This is as opposed to his opponent, McCain who in most of the messages seemed not to be sure. Moreover, by forming black, Hispanic, and white voters’ supporters, Obama was able to win. This is as opposed to his opponent who had white voters as his only supporters.

On the other hand, one reason why McCain lost is that in the Wall Street meltdown no leadership was shown. Also, he indicated that he could not multitask as a president by returning to D.C, after postponing his campaign. This is unlike the approach of his opponent, Obama, who showed cool-headedness together with his statement, which indicated a good president should be able to multitask. Additionally, the use of negative campaigns made another reason for McCain to lose. The constant negativity barrage, which he used, turned off many voters. However, despite noting some negative ads, which marked a third of the entire ads by Obama, voters found those of McCain having more prevalence. Moreover, most of the voters sought to see more optimistic ads, which Obama could afford easily since money was not a problem for him.

Conclusion

From the above, it is clear that though Obama won a second term in office, a lot of work is awaiting him to prove the Republicans wrong, and prove his worth to the Democrats who voted for him. The issue of the U.S economy is an issue that affects the whole world, which if he does not address well inflation will continue to affect all countries. Other issues that he ought to look at are unemployment, health provisions, among others.

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