The Importance of Truth in A Doll’s House, by Henrik Ibsen Essay

Though unknown to the outside world, many seemingly perfect relationships are dark moral places to investigate. We constantly see idealistic relationships that appear flawless at first glance; however, we are too taken aback when we discover such relationships are based on deception. In A Doll House, Henrik Ibsen contends through Nora that truth plays a crucial role in idealistic living; and when idealistic lifestyles are built on deceit an individual will eventually undergo an epiphany resulting in a radical understanding of reality, potentially leading to the destruction of relationships. This idea is exercised in the play when Ibsen immerses us directly in the center of a romantic and idealized relationship between an older man, Torvald Helmer, and his childlike trophy wife Nora. While Nora is young, beautiful, childlike, immature and naïve, her husband Torvald is a stern, serious and controlling business man. Throughout the play, we discover how faulty and deceptive based the relationship between Torvald and Nora is, and so does Nora. Act one involves an introduction of the relationship between the two, and we are first introduced to the idea of how baseless the relationship really is on truth. The second act develops Nora’s recognition of the faulty marriage and further problems begin to complicate as well as develop Nora’s understanding; finally, the third act is when Nora experiences the epiphany that her relationship with Torvald is truly faulty and is based on nothing true at all. Although the idea that was significantly radical in Ibsen’s time, it is significant and seems to become more evident as a truth in our society today. Openness and truth is necessary for a truly idealistic lifestyle.

In Act I we are introduced …

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…a that an idealistic lifestyle based off of lies and falsehood is in fact, not an idealistic lifestyle at all. At every opportunity Ibsen suggests that behind the façade of marriage, what exists is nothing close to what a marriage should be, and this is exactly what Nora comes to realize nearing the end of the play. The one miracle she had hopped to occur, was that their “Living together could be a true marriage.” It is undeniable that the ideas Ibsen develops that truth plays a crucial role in idealistic living; and when such idealistic lifestyles are built on deceit an individual will eventually undergo an epiphany resulting in a radical understanding of reality. In the case of this play, Nora and Torvald’s relationship disintegrates and she leaves him to find herself and to find a true idealistic lifestyle. As for Nora and Torvald, their marriage is destroyed.

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