Feminism & Mid-20th Century Western Films: An Unlikely Parallel

The growth of feminism’s influence in American society during the mid-20th century paralleled the rise of strong, independent female characters over the traditionally weak women of Hollywood western film. The shift of female character types in a predominantly patriarchal genre correlates with the rise of feminism and the increase of movements rights, especially in the … Read moreFeminism & Mid-20th Century Western Films: An Unlikely Parallel

Examinations of Philosophy and Identity in Faulkner’s As I Lay Dying

The story of a dysfunctional family and its epic journey across the South, William Faulkner’s As I Lay Dying is famous for its use of multiple narrators who interpret and recount the journey of the Bundren clan from their own unique perspectives. All of the characters, whether members of the family or outsiders who encounter … Read moreExaminations of Philosophy and Identity in Faulkner’s As I Lay Dying

Anne Bradstreet’s Poetic Message of Hope

Hope in the face of death seems to be an impossible concept to adequately convey to a reader. After all, death itself seems to be the epitome of hopelessness and despair. However, Anne Bradstreet conveys in her poetry this very idea. Bradstreet lived in a Puritan community in America where people lived very hard lives … Read moreAnne Bradstreet’s Poetic Message of Hope

The Clear Value of Romantic Love: “Soeur Louise de la Misericorde,” “Twice,” and Other Poems

The idea of romantic love being presented as invariably negative in 19th century literature is questionable to some extent. Romantic love is often characterised as being damaging and hurtful in Rossetti’s poetry through the contrast with divine love in poems such as ‘Soeur Louise de la Misericorde’ and ‘Twice’, supported by her religious devotion and … Read moreThe Clear Value of Romantic Love: “Soeur Louise de la Misericorde,” “Twice,” and Other Poems

Damaging Impacts: The Importance of Internal Conflicts in “War”

It is a widespread belief that war brings peace through destruction, however, in certain circumstances, the destruction is so great that no amount of peace can reconcile the lives and emotion lost. In the short story “War”, Timothy Findley writes about Neil, an innocent, coming-of-age boy who is enjoying his summer when suddenly he is … Read moreDamaging Impacts: The Importance of Internal Conflicts in “War”

Cloudstreet Analysis: Place and Identity in Winton’s Narrative

Tim Winton’s Cloudstreet (1991) is a fantastical and vivid exploration of the lives of the 20th century ‘Aussie battlers’ whose reputations fabricated the Australian identity present in today’s society. The novel resonates the idea that this identity was forged through hardship, tragedy, faith and luck in a country shaped by injustice. I believe that a … Read moreCloudstreet Analysis: Place and Identity in Winton’s Narrative

He Loves Me…He Loves Me Not

At the crux of Chronicle of a Death Foretold is a love story. The story itself is quite simple but in reality is dominated by the elusiveness of love and filled with cultural customs, clashes, illusions, and ambivalence. The conception of love in the novel is bleak; Santiago’s parents marry out of convenience “without a … Read moreHe Loves Me…He Loves Me Not

The Young, the Old, and David Lurie

It is universally accepted that, at the age of fifty-two, men should be courting women of similar ages. However, David Lurie, the protagonist of J. M. Coetzee’s Disgrace, does not comply with these standards. He is absolutely infatuated with women in their twenties, his college students, and young schoolgirls as well. Not only is he … Read moreThe Young, the Old, and David Lurie