Essay on Analysis Of Lorraine Hansberry ‘s ‘ A Raisin Of The Sun ‘

African Men in America

In the play “A Raisin in the Sun”, Lorraine Hansberry describes the new lives of Africans living in America after the period of slavery. The lives of African change drastically, and they have to encounter new obstacles after slavery ends. These obstacles are racism, unequal opportunities, and hatred from the society they live in. Hansberry illustrates these facts through Walter’s family. Each member in Walter’s family has his or her own ambitions and dreams. These characters represent a particular group of Africans who live in the post World War II. In comparison to other characters, Walter stands out the most compare to other characters due to the characteristics he possesses. Walter transforms from an ambitious dreamer and a selfish man to a leader of his family, overcoming the obstacles and challenges to becoming an independent black man in America . Past Tense? (I am not sure.)Walter represents the group of black men who lived during the post-World War II. Like Walter, many black men encountered challenges and obstacles before they became independent and successful in their society. One of these obstacles was education. According to EducationNext, in 1952, there was “More than a quarter of black males (28 percent) completed no more than four years of schooling, compared with less than 9 percent of white males” (FULLER). Education is a key to a better and happier life, but there were many black men who did not have a proper education compare to the white men. This lack of education prevented the black men to have the opportunity to improve their lives. Thus, lack of education did not allow them to work in high-ranking occupations such as CEO, government officials, and office workers because these jobs w…

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…that not many African men had during his time. Walter has a happy family, a loving wife, and an acceptable occupation. Unfortunately, Walter wants more in his life, and he feels hopeless and depressed when something does not go in his ways. Walter starts to change when he experiences and learns Willis’s betrayal, his father’s hard work, his son’s dream of becoming a bus driver, and his mother’s explanation about the Africans’ pride. Through many difficulties, Walter becomes the man of the family, and he learns the importance of accepting and living a happy life with his family. Like Walter, many African men had to overcome the challenges and obstacles. They had to face and endure through racism. These two ideas often led to many tragic and depressed incidents such as unequal opportunities, inequality treatments, segregation, and death.

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