Feminism and Cultural Exploration in Aurora Leigh

Victorian literature, like almost all literature, speaks inherently of the social, philosophical and religious issues which molded the people of the time. The Romantic ideals of the singling-out and celebration of the self are often challenged by Victorian literature, with its focus on putting the self into a social context and examining the relationship which … Read moreFeminism and Cultural Exploration in Aurora Leigh

The Runaway Slave at Pilgrim’s Point Analysis

‘The Runaway Slave at Pilgrim’s Point,’ by Elizabeth Barrett Browning, is a dramatic monologue spoken through the voice of a female runaway slave. Browning was an abolitionist. In this poem, Browning deviates from the traditional values of motherhood and creates a narration where the speaker kills her child, who is a product of this oppressive … Read moreThe Runaway Slave at Pilgrim’s Point Analysis

Romantic Language Comparison: How do I Love Thee? and Sonnet 116

Both ‘How Do I Love Thee? (Sonnet 43)’ by Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Shakespeare’s ‘Sonnet 116’ explore the ideas of love and romance in the traditional form of a sonnet. Whereas Browning writes about the intense love she felt towards her husband-to-be in Sonnet 43, which was part of a series of sonnets written in … Read moreRomantic Language Comparison: How do I Love Thee? and Sonnet 116

The “Silence of Womanhood”: Paradox as Power in Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s Sonnet 13

In Sonnet 13 of Sonnets from the Portuguese, Elizabeth Barrett Browning skillfully manipulates the sonnet form to construct what is essentially a love poem, albeit an unusual one that paradoxically eschews the rote sentimentality associated with these works and emphasizes separation rather than blissful union. The poem’s variations in syntactic structure, rhyme scheme, and diction … Read moreThe “Silence of Womanhood”: Paradox as Power in Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s Sonnet 13

Pity and Revenge in Frankenstein and The Cry of the Children

Both the poem The Cry of the Children by Elizabeth Barrett Browning and the novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley portray acts of cruelty in an attempt to arouse pity from readers. The victims in each case feel bitter self-pity and respond with resentment towards those who wrong them. The working class children in the poem … Read morePity and Revenge in Frankenstein and The Cry of the Children

Analyzing “How do I love thee?…” By Elizabeth Barrett Browning

William Wordsworth once described poetry as being “the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings…”(1). He could not have described Barrett’s Sonnet 43 more succinctly, in spite of the fact that he preceded her by half a century. Barrett wrote 44 sonnets about her love for her fellow contemporary poet and later husband, Robert Browning, a series … Read moreAnalyzing “How do I love thee?…” By Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Devices Used In Jane Eyre and Aurora Leigh to Represent Female Subjugation

Though the authors and genres of the works Jane Eyre and Aurora Leigh are distinctive, the messages and methods of communication within both are quite comparable. Both authors aim to, among other things, expose the plight of their female contemporaries and offer strong suggestions as to how the injustices faced by women might be rectified. … Read moreDevices Used In Jane Eyre and Aurora Leigh to Represent Female Subjugation

Poetry, Gender and Nature versus Reality: Aurora Leigh and Elizabeth Barrett Browning

The Victorian era was a period of great social and political upheaval, especially for women. Increasing opposition to the lack of women’s political rights in relation to marriage and property laws, such as the fact that any income a woman earned automatically belonged to her husband, as well as debates on education, was termed “The … Read morePoetry, Gender and Nature versus Reality: Aurora Leigh and Elizabeth Barrett Browning

Pan and the Dual Nature of Artistic Creation in Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s “A Musical Instrument”

In her 1862 poem “A Musical Instrument,” Elizabeth Barrett Browning returns to the mythical figure of Pan, a favorite topic of hers as well as a popular and traditional metaphor for poets since classical times. Barrett Browning had already written about Pan and even the Pan and Syrinx myth in her earlier poems “The Dead … Read morePan and the Dual Nature of Artistic Creation in Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s “A Musical Instrument”