The Risks That Poetry Undertakes: “We Real Cool,” “next to of course god america,” and “Gypsies”

In the present day, poetry is often viewed as an inaccessible literary form – one that is made by and for those with a certain education and class background. T. S. Eliot commented that ‘it appears […] that poets in our civilisation […] must be difficult’ to be considered important.[1] However, the origins of poetry … Read moreThe Risks That Poetry Undertakes: “We Real Cool,” “next to of course god america,” and “Gypsies”

e. e. cummings: A Lyrical Rebel

Modernist poet Edward Estlin Cummings (pen name e. e. cummings) uses diverse poetic structures in “Buffalo Bill’s” and “next to of course god america i” to draw the reader’s attention to the deeper meaning behind the words. Cummings experiments with capitalization, punctuation, and line breaks to lightly veil his personal opinions with humor and disorganization. … Read moree. e. cummings: A Lyrical Rebel

Life is Meaningless: E.E. Cummings’ l(a

Throughout his illustrious career, E.E. Cummings produced some of the finest poems, plays, and paintings the world has ever seen. While many are masterpieces, few are as unique as his leaf-style poems. Perhaps his most famous – and arguably his best – of those poems is the transcendent “l(a.” At the surface, “l(a” is a … Read moreLife is Meaningless: E.E. Cummings’ l(a

The Imagery of American Hypocrisy in Poetry

Poetry has been used since its inception to send strong messages about current and historical issues, and these are often political in nature. In their poems “next to of course god america i” and “King Cotton, 1907” from “Scenes from a Documentary History of Mississippi,” E.E. Cummings and Natasha Trethewey, respectively, explore the nationalism and … Read moreThe Imagery of American Hypocrisy in Poetry