“Respectability and Escape: Unrealized Potential in The Dead”

In the Irish Catholic Society portrayed by James Joyce in Dubliners, the characters live in a world guided by “respectability”, yet some are driven by the urge to escape. Joyce illustrates the reputable populace as false and undesirable, and depicts his protagonists as the few who recognize and attempt to seize opposing views. Nevertheless, in … Read more“Respectability and Escape: Unrealized Potential in The Dead”

Eveline as Ireland: a realistic and symbolic approach

Eveline as Ireland: a realistic and symbolic approachJames Joyce has always been widely regarded as a major exponent of ‘the children of a fragmented, pluralistic, sick, weird period’ as Nietzsche called the artists of the time (Bradbury, p. 7). His career as an artist may be considered a ‘journey from realism to symbolism’ (Daitchies, p. … Read moreEveline as Ireland: a realistic and symbolic approach

The New Manly Woman: How Female Strength of Self is Achieved through Expression and Ownership of Sexuality in Joyce

Like character actors or members of an ensemble drama, women are omnipresent in Joyce’s literary corpus. In Dubliners, for example, women are painted and developed within a variety of character framings. The reader is exposed to woman as sister (such as the sisters Moran in “The Dead”), as young girl (Eveline), as ethereal object of … Read moreThe New Manly Woman: How Female Strength of Self is Achieved through Expression and Ownership of Sexuality in Joyce

Hardly Joyous: Servitude in Hardy and Joyce

Both James Joyce’s Eveline and Thomas Hardy’s The Son’s Veto express the negative effects that service has upon an individual’s life. While Joyce uses an intimate obligation, a promise to a dying mother, Hardy’s story addresses a wider cultural restriction that is created by social class systems. This paper will explore the disdain felt by … Read moreHardly Joyous: Servitude in Hardy and Joyce

Motionless Citzenry: A Look at the Theme of Paralysis in James Joyce’s Dubliners

Every night as I gazed up at the window I said softly to myself the word, paralysis. It had always sounded strangely in my ears, like the word gnomon in the Euclid and the word simony in the Catechism. But now it soundedto me like the name of some maleficent and sinful being. It filled … Read moreMotionless Citzenry: A Look at the Theme of Paralysis in James Joyce’s Dubliners

Duffy as the Übermensch

According to Friedrich Nietzsche, “‘free spirits’…do not exist, did not exist” but “could one day exist” (18). Mr. James Duffy, the protagonist of James Joyce’s “A Painful Case” in Dubliners, has characteristics similar to that of Nietzsche’s theoretical overman. Nevertheless, although Duffy appears to live like an overman, his life ironically parallels an ascetic religion … Read moreDuffy as the Übermensch

Duality and Paralysis in “Two Gallants”

Duality and Paralysis in “Two Gallants”James Joyce’s “Two Gallants”, from Dubliners, is at first glance the tale of two men driven by greed to manipulate a slavey. Lenehan and Corley enjoy their mischievous banter as they stroll through Dublin, all the while plotting to deviously collect money from a woman. When examined closer, “Two Gallants” … Read moreDuality and Paralysis in “Two Gallants”