Repetition Is Key: Style and Meaning in Cry, the Beloved Country

Repetition is key to the dramatic effect in chapter 12 of Cry, the Beloved Country. Three important things are repeated: the title of the novel, the laws, and separation. Repetition makes very clear the point that the author, Alan Paton, is conveying: the people of South Africa need help. The repetition of phrases, ideas, or … Read moreRepetition Is Key: Style and Meaning in Cry, the Beloved Country

The Home and Family in The House on Mango Street and Cry, the Beloved Country

The House on Mango Street and Cry, the Beloved Country both involve themes emphasizing the home and family. From the old umfundisi seeking for his prodigal son to Esperanza searching and wanting a place of her own, both of these prolific stories involve how one reacts to the attraction of home and family. These novels … Read moreThe Home and Family in The House on Mango Street and Cry, the Beloved Country

The Beloved Country Cries in Pain

Written at the pinnacle of South Africa’s social and racial crisis, Alan Paton’s novel Cry, the Beloved Country traces the struggle of two families, black and white, through their shared suffering and the devotion to their beloved country that unites them in the end. Paton thoughtfully weaves his plot to show the diverse population’s differing … Read moreThe Beloved Country Cries in Pain

The Interrelated Structure of Cry, the Beloved Country

Alan Paton’s Cry, the Beloved Country exhibits the effects of living in Johannesburg; though it is a city divided by race, its inhabitants lead parallel lives (Cry, the Beloved Country 33-312). The lives of the two main characters, Stephen Kumalo and James Jarvis, are first depicted separately, giving each a quality of distinctness and independence … Read moreThe Interrelated Structure of Cry, the Beloved Country

Quest for the Son and Suffering in Cry, The Beloved Country

Throughout the novel Cry, the Beloved Country by Alan Paton, Paton uses suffering and the quest for the son together to add to the tragic framework of the novel. Paton uses suffering, an element derived from Greek tragedy in which the main protagonist(s) of the novel are subjected to hardship and pain, to enhance the … Read moreQuest for the Son and Suffering in Cry, The Beloved Country