How Society Compensates for Spirituality

Within T.S. Eliot’s “The Hollow Men” the influences of society and how it can affect the general personality of the public is reflected in Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby and Countee Cullen’s “Yet Do I Marvel”. Eliot uses the contradiction of hollow and stuffed men to set up how men have been affected by their societies, … Read moreHow Society Compensates for Spirituality

A Formalist Critical Approach to “Heritage” by Countee Cullen

The speaker in “Heritage” expresses profound emotions regarding an African-American perspective of the motherland. Countee Cullen writes in an irregular meter throughout the piece, consistently using seven syllables in each line. The speaker is effectually declaring the pains of the slave trade to be innocuous to an African American with the poem’s perspective, which is … Read moreA Formalist Critical Approach to “Heritage” by Countee Cullen

Cracking the Carapace: A Synthesis of the Harlem Renaissance

“During the early 1900s, the burgeoning African-American middle class began pushing a new political agenda that advocated racial equality. The epicenter of this movement was in New York, where three of the largest civil rights groups established their headquarters.” (Harlem Renaissance, 2011). This cultural movement of the 1920s and 1930s, also known as the “New … Read moreCracking the Carapace: A Synthesis of the Harlem Renaissance

The Voices of the Voiceless: Comparing the Poetry of Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen

As two key figureheads in what is now deemed the Harlem Renaissance, Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen served as voices for a previously voiceless population. Their poetry speaks of the enduring struggles of being an African American, and the effort required to merely survive in such a discriminatory society. However, despite being poets with similar … Read moreThe Voices of the Voiceless: Comparing the Poetry of Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen