False to my Nature?: Coriolanus and the Art of Supposition

In a play largely about politics, class struggles, and the right of rhetoric versus the will to action, what remains most interesting about Coriolanus is its titular character: a relatively laconic soldier thrust into an unchosen world. Whereas the plebeians in the play long only for a democratic voice, Coriolanus, the chief guardian of the … Read moreFalse to my Nature?: Coriolanus and the Art of Supposition

Volumnia’s Dog: The Roman Classical Conditioning of Coriolanus

In William Shakespeare’s final tragedy Coriolanus, plebeians, senators, soldiers, enemies, and even some immediate family struggle in their attempts to indentify and characterize the essence of Caius Marcius Coriolanus. Coriolanus himself struggles for much of the final two acts of the play, trying out an identity that he ultimately realizes to be a contrived farce … Read moreVolumnia’s Dog: The Roman Classical Conditioning of Coriolanus

The Gendering of Tragedy: Honor in Shakespeare’s Coriolanus

Vengeance, chaos, uncertain honor and untimely death-whether describing the fall from grace of a noble king, impassioned General, or valiant warrior, each arises in the historically based tragedies of William Shakespeare. Coriolanus, Shakespeare’s account of the societal and self destruction of a Roman warrior paragon, proves no exception, depicting the demise that results from any … Read moreThe Gendering of Tragedy: Honor in Shakespeare’s Coriolanus

Humanity Versus Heroism in Shakespeare’s Richard III and Coriolanus

Shakespeare’s Richard III and Coriolanus are both characters who possess all the qualities of potentially invincible, fearless, and heroic warriors. They fail to emerge as heroes because neither of them are able to live beyond their idealistic motives as warriors, and incorporate humanity into their characters. Richard is consumed by his God-like complex, unexpectedly finding … Read moreHumanity Versus Heroism in Shakespeare’s Richard III and Coriolanus

Re-Creation and Immortal Fame: The Search for Eternal Life in Macbeth and Coriolanus

In Shakespeare’s time, having children was, arguably, even more important than it is today. In a society dominated by rules of inheritance and birthright, children were important, not only as the means of carrying on a name and genetic material, but also title and property. Shakespeare’s Macbeth and Coriolanus take up this issue but seem … Read moreRe-Creation and Immortal Fame: The Search for Eternal Life in Macbeth and Coriolanus

When in Rome, Do as Coriolanus Doesn’t

Particularly interesting in a genre that by its definition is meant to be a crowd-pleaser, Shakespeare’s play Coriolanus provides a protagonist who is not particularly likeable. Constantly insulting in his speech, prideful and short-tempered, Coriolanus, unlike his mother Volumnia, is neither able nor willing to accommodate political necessities in Rome. His shortcoming may be viewed … Read moreWhen in Rome, Do as Coriolanus Doesn’t

Name Brand – The Use of Names as Metonymy for Actions in Coriolanus

Mention Tonya Harding, Timothy McVeigh or Monica Lewinsky, and immediately the infamous deeds of each individual come to mind. Each of these names meant nothing until actions such as sex and violence became associated with them. Monica Lewinsky’s name became so recognizable that she used her name alone to try to sell a line of … Read moreName Brand – The Use of Names as Metonymy for Actions in Coriolanus

Comparison of the ‘Coriolanus Asks for the People’s Voices’ Scene in the Film and Text Versions

Despite the adaptation of a text to film benefiting from the opportunities and abilities bestowed to a director through the visual aspect of the medium, narrative complexity and depth of literary themes almost inevitably suffer a condensation. Ralph Fiennes’s adaptation of William Shakespeare’s Coriolanus is not immune to this trend, with temporal constraints forcing Fiennes … Read moreComparison of the ‘Coriolanus Asks for the People’s Voices’ Scene in the Film and Text Versions

Coriolanus the Overgrown Child: Analysis of Language to Interpret the Character

Shakespeare conjures in Coriolanus a character who manifests at times the immaturity and childishness of a typically arrogant and naïve Shakespearean antagonist; yet so too does he render a sense of Coriolanus’ virtuous nobility and honesty which one would find in an archetypally sympathetic Shakespearean protagonist. Thus, Shakespeare splits critics and audiences alike into these … Read moreCoriolanus the Overgrown Child: Analysis of Language to Interpret the Character