The Self as Influenced by the Uncanny in De Quincey’s Opium-Eater

Even before Thomas De Quincey fully expounds upon the mental and physical effects of frequent substance abuse in his Confessions of an English Opium-Eater, he states that “…if no definite boundary can be assigned to one’s power, the spirit of hope and pleasure makes it virtually infinite” (8). Far from delivering a simplistic commentary on … Read moreThe Self as Influenced by the Uncanny in De Quincey’s Opium-Eater

Intoxication and the Orient in Baudelaire and De Quincey

In Artificial Paradises, Baudelaire writes this of hashish: “Enthusiasts who would procure the magical delights of this substance at any price have continued to seek out hashish which has crossed the Mediterranean—that is, hashish made from Indian or Egyptian hemp”(15). Only hashish from the “Orient,” i.e. most of Asia and Northern Africa, is intoxicating enough … Read moreIntoxication and the Orient in Baudelaire and De Quincey

Emerging from Darkness and Dreams in De Quincey

De Quincey’s dreams and visions as described in his work function as a different world, which exists in places of temporary darkness, and his attempts to capture them must function outside of that world, in a well-lit space of recollection and translation onto paper. This hindsight is comparable to the manner in which he acted … Read moreEmerging from Darkness and Dreams in De Quincey