Classical Views of Liberalism

Classical liberalism, as expressed by Locke, contains the notions of both intellectual or physical liberty (i.e., the natural rights and freedoms of man with respect to society) and economic liberty (i.e., the right to own and transmit property). With respect to the development of property rights, Locke argued from the standpoint of both Christian theology … Read moreClassical Views of Liberalism

Marx and Burke’s Contrasting Views of Ideal Progress

Edmund Burke and Karl Marx would have been mortified at each other’s conception of acceptable progress and the movement of history. Such repugnance, in fact, was indeed expressed by Marx, reflecting the two polar views of his and Burke’s respective philosopher parents, in this quote directed at Burke: The sycophant-who in the pay of the … Read moreMarx and Burke’s Contrasting Views of Ideal Progress

Communism and the Need for Political Action

As a young writer in a time of brewing class tensions, Marx studied the historical and present relationship between the classes and wrote several works, including “The German Ideology” (1845-46) and “Manifesto of the Communist Party” (1848). In his study of the history of society, Marx elucidates a trend in society toward an increase in … Read moreCommunism and the Need for Political Action

Marxist Influences in Darwin’s Origin of Species

Less than a decade after Karl Marx completed his philosophical work, The German Ideology: Part I, Charles Darwin was finally persuaded to publish his biological masterpiece, The Origin of Species. Could these two works be bound intrinsically through Marx’s moral account of history? Is it possible that such politically charged material influenced a scientific thesis … Read moreMarxist Influences in Darwin’s Origin of Species

Marx: Alienation, Unity, and Human Nature

Differentiation, decomposition, alienation, estrangement: these words appear again and again in Marx’s writings as descriptions of the failures of capitalism. For him, an emphasis on community and equality was the solution to the degrading atmosphere of competition that he observed around him. Much of his work could be interpreted as an attempt, often through critiques … Read moreMarx: Alienation, Unity, and Human Nature

Marx: Idealism vs. Materialism

Karl Marx’s infamous statement that, “I am not a Marxistâ€? holds a profound truth deeply connected with his philosophy. It could be understood to mean that he disdained the hundreds of interpretations of his work following their publication. However, the statement resounds with a more important idea — that a person cannot “followâ€? a philosophy … Read moreMarx: Idealism vs. Materialism

The Communist Manifesto and the Industrial Proletariat

Karl Marx’s Communist Manifesto was most appealing to and revolutionary for the industrial workers of 1848 (and those to come after that time). The call for unification of the proletariat and abolishment of the Bourgeoisie was an urgent one during a time of rapid progress in all aspects of industrial life. This urgency of The … Read moreThe Communist Manifesto and the Industrial Proletariat

The Reversal of Power: A Marxist Reading of Frankenstein

As Victor Frankenstein of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein delves deeper into his search for the causes of life, he becomes consumed by his quest for the answer to his question as he toils over his creation – a decrepit but mortal form compiled of various body parts. He pushes himself to the edge of his capacity … Read moreThe Reversal of Power: A Marxist Reading of Frankenstein

Conformity in the Kite Runner and the Communist Manifesto

As psychologist Rollo May once said: “The opposite of courage in our society is not cowardice, it’s conformity.” Throughout Khaled Hosseini’s novel, The Kite Runner, the reader is exposed to the dueling themes of conformity versus nonconformity, and the effects of either of those actions on those around them. But can this battle of to … Read moreConformity in the Kite Runner and the Communist Manifesto

Marx and Freud: Human Happiness and Human Nature

At the root of Karl Marx and Sigmund Freud’s differences regarding the nature of human happiness are their almost diametrically opposed models of human nature. Freud describes human nature in terms of universal, instinctive drives, the fulfillment of which constitutes happiness in its most basic form; Marx believes humans to be the only creatures capable … Read moreMarx and Freud: Human Happiness and Human Nature