The Dawn is Coming: “Frost at Midnight’s” Hope for the Next Generation

It’s a common hope in the life of parents that their children will go on and live more successful lives. That their child will learn the lessons their parents taught them and the road their parents laid out for them to lead them to a more promising future. In Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s poem “The Frost … Read moreThe Dawn is Coming: “Frost at Midnight’s” Hope for the Next Generation

The Socially Revolutionary Nature of Coleridge’s Conversation Poems

The Romantics sought to distinguish their work from the Enlightenment Era’s prioritisation of logic and reason by rejecting and, in effect, redefining literary convention. Coleridge’s conversation poems are considered hallmarks of Romanticism for their revolutionary treatment of form and confrontation of core 19th century values. As a means of celebrating the imagination and communicating with … Read moreThe Socially Revolutionary Nature of Coleridge’s Conversation Poems

Comparison of Anne Finch’s ‘To The Nightingale’ and Samuel Coleridge’s ‘To The Nightingale’

Anne Finch’s ‘To The Nightingale’ and Samuel Coleridge’s identically titled poem both display a pastoral appreciation of nature. The two poems are both conversation poems. This was a particularly popular form in the Romantic Period, and used conversational language to discuss higher themes of nature and morality. The protagonists address the nightingale, and use it … Read moreComparison of Anne Finch’s ‘To The Nightingale’ and Samuel Coleridge’s ‘To The Nightingale’

Attaining the Harmonious Vision through the Natural World

From the 18th to the early 19th century, a wave of Romantic writers rose fervently against the emergence of industrialisation, resisting against the Industrial Revolution’s intrusion upon the natural world. Samuel Coleridge, William Wordsworth, and female writers such as Joanna Baillie were among the many Romantic poets rising against this decline of nature. These poets … Read moreAttaining the Harmonious Vision through the Natural World

Language, Verse Form, and Loss in The Mariner

”To account for life is one thing; to explain life another” – Coleridge (Norton p.596) One of the most easily definable of Coleridge’s Mariner’s losses is his loss of a concrete existence. Coleridge’s mariner exists in a liminal space in ‘The Rime of the Ancient Mariner’. He is neither dead nor alive, his soul has … Read moreLanguage, Verse Form, and Loss in The Mariner

Values of Romanticism: Wollstonecraft, Coleridge, and Shelley

The Romantic period was a time of exceptional change, emphasising the power of imagination as a window to transcendent experience and spiritual health. Lasting from the late 18th to early 19th century, the transitory period of Romanticism challenged engraved societal paradigms, moving from a time of strict hierarchy based on rationality to a focus on … Read moreValues of Romanticism: Wollstonecraft, Coleridge, and Shelley

The Sublime in the Poetry of Keats and Coleridge

The philosophical concept of The Sublime, though typically hard to define due to its complex nature, is most often described as an object or a surrounding which evokes a feeling of profound awe when viewed. The key difference between the concept of The Sublime and the more straightforward one of ‘beauty’ is that The Sublime, … Read moreThe Sublime in the Poetry of Keats and Coleridge

How the Lyrical Ballads Portray a Natural and Exuberant Sense of Life?

‘Lines’ opens with a celebration of natural life and its exuberance, ‘the red-breast sings from his tall larch’. Here the singing robin is portrayed through metonymy giving a sense that it is something accessible and familiar to the common people. The singing ‘red breast’ and ‘tall larch’ are dual symbols of joy and renewal, linked … Read moreHow the Lyrical Ballads Portray a Natural and Exuberant Sense of Life?

Homoerotics of Romantic Poetry

In the work of the Romantic poets, there is a clear disparity in the representation of male and female homoerotics. While male homosexual poetry is generally characterised by a careful synthesis of personal feeling and an imagined homosocial tradition in Hellenism, female homoerotics are typically torn between an extreme degree of sexual sublimation into the … Read moreHomoerotics of Romantic Poetry