The ‘Ideal’ in Campion and Marlowe

Thomas Campion and Christopher Marlowe have explored the concept of ‘the ideal’ in ‘A Man of Life Upright’ and ‘Come Live with me, and be my Love,’ respectively. Campion delves into the idea that a man may be more content in life by upholding strong morality. In ‘Come Live with me, and be my Love,’ … Read moreThe ‘Ideal’ in Campion and Marlowe

The Veiled Woman: Female Innocence Comes “Undone” in Marlow’s Hero and Leander

Although the nature vs. nurture debate seems as though it is a rather contemporary argument, it was actually a common thematic element of Elizabethan literature. Christopher Marlowe, in particular, focused on human behavior and the influences of natural instinct versus learned habit. In his “minor epic” Hero and Leander, Marlowe genders nature and nurture by … Read moreThe Veiled Woman: Female Innocence Comes “Undone” in Marlow’s Hero and Leander

Central Themes of The Passionate Shepherd to his Love and The Nymph’s Reply

The poems “The Nymph’s Reply to the Shepherd” by Sir William Raleigh, and “The Passionate Shepherd to His Love” by Christopher Marlowe have the same central theme, that love and nature are beautiful but don’t last forever. Both authors use literary elements to support this central idea. In “The Nymph’s Reply to the Shepherd”, Raleigh … Read moreCentral Themes of The Passionate Shepherd to his Love and The Nymph’s Reply

An Explication of Lord Byron’s She Walks in Beauty and Christopher Marlowe’s The Face That Launched a Thousand Ships

On the afternoon of June 11, 1814, at the home of Lady Sitwell, George Gordon, Lord Byron, upon seeing his cousin Lady Anne Wilmot Horton in “a mourning dress of spangled black” (Leung 312), was so moved that by the next day he had written “She Walks in Beauty,” first published in Hebrew Melodies in … Read moreAn Explication of Lord Byron’s She Walks in Beauty and Christopher Marlowe’s The Face That Launched a Thousand Ships

The Poet and the Narrator in Christopher Marlowe’s Hero and Leander

In Christopher Marlowe’s narrative poem Hero and Leander, a major obstacle confronts the reader in the form of attempting to separate the narrative voice of the poet Marlowe from that which W.L. Godshalk calls “the sensibility of a dramatized narrator. . . who stands between us and the lovers” (307). David Farkas, in his “Problems … Read moreThe Poet and the Narrator in Christopher Marlowe’s Hero and Leander

The Interplay of Reason and Passion in “Hero and Leander”

“The dominant mode of ethical thinking in the Renaissance argued that the passions should be governed by reason to ensure good order in society.” A paradox exists in Renaissance ethics: passions – by definition, ‘barely controllable’ – should be controlled, and the success of a stable public sphere pivots on the control of one’s private … Read moreThe Interplay of Reason and Passion in “Hero and Leander”

Contradiction, Comedy, and Sympathy in Marlowe’s ‘Hero and Leander’

Christopher Marlowe’s Hero and Leander challenges 16th century Christian teaching. Christian teaching on desire stems from Thomas Aquinas’ Natural Law which is a set of moral laws intended to identify God’s purpose for human life. One of the five primary precepts states that the main purpose of sex is to procreate. Therefore, according to Natural … Read moreContradiction, Comedy, and Sympathy in Marlowe’s ‘Hero and Leander’