Sensibility and Alienation in Charlotte Smith’s “The Emigrants”

In September 1792, French revolutionaries murdered over one thousand political prisoners to prevent them from being freed and joining enemy forces. After the September Massacres, many, including the English poet Charlotte Turner Smith, had to question their support of the French Revolution and its founding principles. In 1793, Smith published “The Emigrants,” a two-part poem … Read moreSensibility and Alienation in Charlotte Smith’s “The Emigrants”

Close Reading: Sonnet 32 by Charlotte Smith

The new sensibility that characterizes Romantic literature often leads to the recurrence of melancholy as a powerful and recurrent motif, especially in poetry. Romantic poets recur to their poems to express personal feelings and anxieties and in order to capture this, poets use the imagination. As Addison and Shaftesbury put it, `the imagination must not … Read moreClose Reading: Sonnet 32 by Charlotte Smith

Forms of Psychoanalysis in Keats, Smith and Wordsworth

While oftentimes viewed as contributing to the development of Freudian psychoanalysis, the psychological discourse, and specifically that which deals with the unconscious (the part of the psyche which subjects are actively unaware), of Romantic poetry can also be seen as possessing various methods of its own for examining the psyche. Romanticism is frequently seen as … Read moreForms of Psychoanalysis in Keats, Smith and Wordsworth

Sublimity in Wordsworth and Smith

Romantic literature is deeply concerned with manifestations and attainment of the sublime. The notion itself asserts gender upon both subject and object, and pervades any attempt to gain historical knowledge. This fetishization of the sublime, however does not prevent the concept from being subverted consciously and unconsciously in the literature of the period. The poetic … Read moreSublimity in Wordsworth and Smith

Close Reading of ‘Ode to Death’: Smith’s Paradox of Acceptance

Charlotte Smith’s late poem ‘Ode to Death’, published in 1797 in her collection of Elegiac Sonnets, draws on the idea of accepting death as a ‘friend’ (l.1) rather than fearing it. The ode carries a deep sense of desperation and sorrow, as it alludes to the grief endured by Smith in her own lifetime; predominantly … Read moreClose Reading of ‘Ode to Death’: Smith’s Paradox of Acceptance

Order of Experience in Charlotte Smith’s Sonnets

Through her series of celebrated published sonnets, Charlotte Smith has provided readers and critics with useful insights into the life and experiences of an 18th century woman whose life events met her with a great number of detriments. Her self-described melancholic state through which she mourns a lost happiness often stands as a focus of … Read moreOrder of Experience in Charlotte Smith’s Sonnets