The Best of Both Worlds

In Voltaire’s Candide, the title character voyages from continent to continent in search of love and the meaning of life. On his journeys, his optimism–learned from his ever-present tutor, Pangloss–is slowly whittled away. Candide experiences corruption and deceit, particularly in the church. Most importantly, Candide realizes that one should cultivate one’s own life and not … Read moreThe Best of Both Worlds

The Child-like Scientist: A Study of the Similarities Between Jonathan Swifts’ Gulliver’s Travels and Voltaire’s Candide in Reference to Satire Developed through Naivete

A child has the ability to make the most critical and objective observation on society and the behavior of man. How is this possible? A child has yet to mature and lacks proper education and experience. However, it is for this very reason that a child would make the perfect social scientist; his or her … Read moreThe Child-like Scientist: A Study of the Similarities Between Jonathan Swifts’ Gulliver’s Travels and Voltaire’s Candide in Reference to Satire Developed through Naivete

Resignation to Realism in Voltaire’s Candide

Although the main characters in Voltaire’s Candide supposedly resign themselves to work and cultivation rather than philosophizing in the end, it is necessary for them to survive struggle and turmoil in order to come to this realization. The adventures that bind Candide to his companions throughout the story provide a model for Voltaire’s outlook toward … Read moreResignation to Realism in Voltaire’s Candide

Function of the Narrative Form in Voltaire’s Candide

In a study of Voltaire’s Candide, the central critical discussion revolves around the final chapter. Candide’s epic journey finds its conclusion in a garden, where Candide and his companions are reunited and choose to spend the rest of their days working the land, a practical resolution to a novel that is filled with idealism. The … Read moreFunction of the Narrative Form in Voltaire’s Candide

Enlightened Absolutism and the Value of Voltaire’s “Tending One’s Own Garden” Metaphor in Candide

Familiarizing oneself with philosophical ideas of 18th century Europe means understanding the ways in which writers during this time dealt with the unique philosophical problems – social, political, scientific and religious – of the Enlightenment period. In the writings of Voltaire, one of the most vocal and adamant reformist philosophers of the Enlightenment era, the … Read moreEnlightened Absolutism and the Value of Voltaire’s “Tending One’s Own Garden” Metaphor in Candide