How Truman Capote Captures the Zeitgeist of America in the 1950s and 1960s

Yoko Ono once described the 1960’s as an era of release from the conventional bonds of society. To understand fully the rejection of society in the 1960’s, one must also evaluate society of the 1950’s. Truman Capote not only captures the essence of the 1960’s rejection of society in his novels Breakfast at Tiffany’s and … Read moreHow Truman Capote Captures the Zeitgeist of America in the 1950s and 1960s

Breakfast at Tiffany’s: A Revolutionary Romantic Comedy

“I’ll tell you one thing, Fred, darling. I’d marry you for your money in a minute. Would you marry me for my money?” Holly Golightly (played by the delightful Audrey Hepburn) drawls to Paul Varjack (George Peppard) as they banter in the tiny kitchen of her minuscule brownstone in downtown New York City. Given Varjack’s … Read moreBreakfast at Tiffany’s: A Revolutionary Romantic Comedy

Truman Capote: A Child’s True Nature in “Miriam”

Two people, one name: an inconspicuous, plain woman versus a poised young girl. A line is drawn between imagination and reality, but that line is blurred. In “Miriam” by Truman Capote, symbolism is incorporated to show that Mrs. Miller is living through the past in the present. A mere child is used to represent the … Read moreTruman Capote: A Child’s True Nature in “Miriam”

Breakfast at Tiffany’s: A Window Into the 1950’s

Truman Capote’s masterpiece of American literature, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, is a wonderful story about misguided love. The novel is well deserving of a place within any compilation of literature and is epically deserving of a place within a collection of women’s literature, as it presents a snapshot of a very human woman from the 1950’s … Read moreBreakfast at Tiffany’s: A Window Into the 1950’s