Wolf in Sheep’s Clothing: the Unintended Racism of Griffin’s Empathy

In John Howard Griffin’s controversial 1962 memoir Black Like Me, white-man Griffin takes an anthropological and personal journey, posing as a black man in the deep south in an attempt to understand the black experience. Equal parts personal revelation and argumentation, Griffin tries to provide proof of pervasive racial discrimination and show that, through empathy, … Read moreWolf in Sheep’s Clothing: the Unintended Racism of Griffin’s Empathy

More Than Appearances: The Depth of Griffin’s Change

John Howard Griffin’s memoir Black Like Me attempts to examine the exclusively physical transformation of a man from white to black. Griffin seeks to more wholly understand racial issues in the 1950s by altering his skin color and “nothing else”. His original white identity enjoys a strong sense of self, demonstrated by consistent personal pronouns, … Read moreMore Than Appearances: The Depth of Griffin’s Change