Actions Speak Louder Than Words

Facial expressions and body language communicate one’s intentions and emotions far better than words. Leo Tolstoy, in Anna Karenina, describes a plethora of physical descriptions, enabling the reader to more completely understand the characters’ emotional state of mind. Other characters and the narrator frequently describe Anna’s shoulders. When Vrosnky and Levin look at them, they … Read moreActions Speak Louder Than Words

Russia in Transition: Anna Karenina and the Ever-Changing Russian Landscape

Though a majority of the characters in Leo Tolstoy’s momentous novel Anna Karenina are members of the nobility, the reforms Czar Alexander II put in place for the lower classes had profound effects on them. The time of his rule was an era of change for the Russian people because so many of his reforms … Read moreRussia in Transition: Anna Karenina and the Ever-Changing Russian Landscape

Parallels to Destruction and Conflict in Anna and Vronsky’s Love Story as Evinced From Their First Meeting

Anna Karenina is a story of split, conflict, schism and divide. Anna’s battle for love, her struggle between what she needs and what she desires, her hatred of lies and her usage of them, her vacillation between libre penseur – liberal values- and old patriarchal and moral values – all reinforce the theme of internal … Read moreParallels to Destruction and Conflict in Anna and Vronsky’s Love Story as Evinced From Their First Meeting

Mixed Messages; Judgment in Anna Karenina

The question of judgment and sympathies in Anna Karenina is one that, every time I have read the novel, seems to become more complicated and slung with obfuscation. The basic problem with locating the voice of judgment is that throughout the novel, there are places where we feel less than comfortable with the seemingly straightforward, … Read moreMixed Messages; Judgment in Anna Karenina

An Examination of Alcohol and Narcotic Use in Anna Karenina

In a polemic against the use of alcohol and narcotics, Lev Tolstoy poses and then answers the question of why men stupefy themselves. He attacks these vices as escapes used to silence the human conscience and allow one to do that which moral convictions would otherwise prevent. Anna Karenina, written thirteen years earlier, provides a … Read moreAn Examination of Alcohol and Narcotic Use in Anna Karenina

Privileged Motherhood in Anna Karenina and The Awakening

In Kate Chopin’s The Awakening, the concept of privileged motherhood is introduced fairly early in the narrative: ““She stood watching the fair woman walk down the long line of galleries with the grace and majesty which queens are sometimes supposed to possess. Her little ones ran to meet her. Two of them clung about her … Read morePrivileged Motherhood in Anna Karenina and The Awakening

How Anna’s near-death experience in labor eventually results in her untimely demise

The idea of seeing a widely loved, magnificent woman go from the envy of St. Petersburg to the deranged, self-obsessed person that made the rash decision to jump underneath a train to get revenge on her husband sounds like a crazy thought. Knowing this, it is important to note that Anna’s suicide in Anna Karenina … Read moreHow Anna’s near-death experience in labor eventually results in her untimely demise