Andrew Marvell: The Pastoral, Conveyed

Andrew Marvell’s poetry exemplifies an ancient literary genre known as the pastoral. This genre, which dates back to the third century B.C.E., represents the values of the shepherd and rustic life. Marvell’s poems “The Garden” and “The Nymph Complaining for the Death of Her Fawn” both embody the pastoral style, but they differ in the … Read moreAndrew Marvell: The Pastoral, Conveyed

To His Coy Virgins

To His Coy Virgins The concept of carpe diem or “seize the day” is a popular poetic credo. Seventeenth century poets Andrew Marvell and Robert Herrick address carpe diem by admonishing young virgins against coyness and procrastination. Despite differences in device, motive, and narrative voice, Marvell’s “To His Coy Mistress” and Herrick’s “To the Virgins, … Read moreTo His Coy Virgins

Variations of Love in Marvell’s “To His Coy Mistress” and Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 116”

In Octavio Paz’s book The Double Flame, he describes three different categories of love that can arise between partners: sexuality, eroticism, and Love. The first category, sexuality, refers to the biological and instinctive urge to reproduce, whereas eroticism descibes the pleasure and desire of the sexual act. The third category, Love, refers to an attraction … Read moreVariations of Love in Marvell’s “To His Coy Mistress” and Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 116”

Artificial Nature and Natural Art: Spenser’s “The Faerie Queene” and Marvell’s “Upon Appleton House”

Many poets draw on the theme of nature to symbolize the message they are trying to convey. In many cases, nature is juxtaposed with artistic design to emphasize the conflict or the relationship between the natural and the human worlds. Millar Maclure clarifies the distinction between nature and art as follows: “nature as what is … Read moreArtificial Nature and Natural Art: Spenser’s “The Faerie Queene” and Marvell’s “Upon Appleton House”

The Love Poems of Rich, Marvell and Campion: Realism vs. Idealization

Jordan Reid BerkowPersonal ResponseLambertDecember 14, 1998The Love Poems of Rich, Marvell and Campion: Realism vs. Idealization Adrienne Rich’s “Twenty-One Love Poems,” which explore the nature of lesbian love, differ strikingly from classic love poems written by a man to a woman, such as Andrew Marvell’s “To His Coy Mistress” and Thomas Campion’s “There Is a … Read moreThe Love Poems of Rich, Marvell and Campion: Realism vs. Idealization

Marvell’s Gardens: A Reading of The Mower Against Gardens and The Garden

For both “The Mower Against Gardens” and “The Garden”, the primary terms in opposition are the same: the world of nature, the world of men. The former is a realm of leisure, the latter of ceaseless, pointless toil. And yet the status granted to the garden in one poem is directly contrary to that granted … Read moreMarvell’s Gardens: A Reading of The Mower Against Gardens and The Garden

Public Reception and Allusion in Marvell’s Poetry

The intention of Andrew Marvell as to publication and public reception was often interfered with by the necessity of his political circumstances, particularly after the restoration of the monarchy in 1660. This interference does however unintentionally enrich the works with a simultaneous feeling of reading the public thoughts of a writer interacting with other published … Read morePublic Reception and Allusion in Marvell’s Poetry

Presentation of the Soul in “A Dialogue, between the Resolved Soul and Created Pleasure” and “On a Drop of Dew”

A number of Marvell’s poetry often centers around the soul and its qualities, notably in ‘A Dialogue, between the Resolved Soul and Created Pleasure’ and ‘On a Drop of Dew’. There is significant highlight of the soul’s spiritual and nature, along with its strong bond to religion and the heavens. ‘A Dialogue, between the Resolved … Read morePresentation of the Soul in “A Dialogue, between the Resolved Soul and Created Pleasure” and “On a Drop of Dew”

Similarities and Differences of Jonson’s “To Penshurst” and Marvell’s “Upon Appleton House”

Andrew Marvell’s “Upon Appleton House” and Ben Jonson’s “To Penshurst” share similarities characteristic of the English “Country House” poem, but they also contain notable differences from each other. Both “To Penshurst” and “Upon Appleton House” describe the respective estates and family life of the poets’ patrons in idyllic terms. An admiration for the aristocracy also … Read moreSimilarities and Differences of Jonson’s “To Penshurst” and Marvell’s “Upon Appleton House”

Metaphysical poets and the idea of nothingness

‘Annihilating all that’s made/To a green thought in green shade.’ -Marvell ‘I am re-begot/of absence, darknesse, death; things which are not.’ -Donne ‘Nothing,’ as a concept has plasticity; it can be used in a number of different ways and refer to any number of different things. Nothing can be an adjective denoting something of little … Read moreMetaphysical poets and the idea of nothingness