Locke, Blake, and Wordsworth: Understanding Experience

William Blake, in his work There Is No Natural Religion, and William Wordsworth, in his poem 1799 Prelude, challenge John Locke’s understanding of the nature of the self by offering alternative theories as to the ways in which we as humans perceive and interpret our experiences. Blake—and to a lesser extent Wordsworth—refutes Locke in his … Read moreLocke, Blake, and Wordsworth: Understanding Experience

Locke’s Proof Against Innate Mathematical Knowledge

John Locke proves that mathematical knowledge is not innate in An Essay Concerning Human Understanding by contrasting Plato’s theory to learning through sensation and perception, thus curating the theory of empiricism. Through his arguments, Locke proves mathematical knowledge is not something that you are born with, clarifying that Plato’s universal consent proves nothing. Knowledge is … Read moreLocke’s Proof Against Innate Mathematical Knowledge

On the Nature of Ideas and Human Understanding: Comparing Locke and Berkeley

The turn of the 17th century prompted a rolling new age of skepticism, in which individuals began to question unequivocal prior beliefs regarding the validity of the Catholic Church, and even the nature of reality. In response to an age echoing with voices of doubt, two primary schools of thought arose. On one hand, Rene … Read moreOn the Nature of Ideas and Human Understanding: Comparing Locke and Berkeley