American Identity in Roth and Miller

In American Pastoral and A View From the Bridge, Philip Roth and Arthur Miller respectively present family life as a tense realm of activity where relationship ties are easily stretched and broken. By setting their novels in Rimrock, New Jersey, and Brooklyn, the authors offer local and interrelated drama to symbolize the tragedy which unfolds … Read moreAmerican Identity in Roth and Miller

Appearance Versus Reality in Three Contemporary American Novels

Appearance versus reality is a major theme of contemporary American fiction. The characters of American Pastoral, We Were the Mulvaneys, and Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf may appear to be living one way, or portray a strong public face, but the reality of their lives contradicts the appearance that they adopt.Philip Roth creates an almost … Read moreAppearance Versus Reality in Three Contemporary American Novels

“Every Man’s Tragedy”: Historical Context and Personal Hardships in Phillip Roth’s American Pastoral

As World War II struck and anti-Semitism rattled Europe, Jewish immigrants migrated into the United States. The Jewish population continued to rise well after World War II, and with a decrease of anti-Semitism throughout the nation, the Jewish population were not discriminated against and were able to find economic and social wealth. One author who … Read more“Every Man’s Tragedy”: Historical Context and Personal Hardships in Phillip Roth’s American Pastoral