First Person, Singular: Fiction as a Vehicle for a Deeper Truth

The map is not the territory, the sculpture is not the subject, and the sequential arrangement of black marks on a white page or screen (or red ochre on a cave wall) is not the reality it attempts to depict. Every recorded human experience has been changed by transmission through the human medium, simply because … Read moreFirst Person, Singular: Fiction as a Vehicle for a Deeper Truth

Isolation Created By War in All Quiet on the Western Front

“I hate war as only a soldier who has lived it can, only as one who has seen its brutality, its stupidity” (Eisenhower 1). These are words written by Dwight Eisenhower, a Five Star General in the United States Army, and a veteran soldier from the Second World War. Eisenhower reveals how, although he did … Read moreIsolation Created By War in All Quiet on the Western Front

Subverting Misconceptions about the Great War: Henri Barbusse’s “Under Fire” and Erich Maria Remarque’s “All Quiet on the Western Front”

Writing towards the end of the twentieth century, German literary scholar Hans Wagener reflects on the deep resonance of war literature, stating: “When we think about certain periods of history, epoch-making books come to mind that capture the spirit of those times most vividly”. Indeed, literary expressions of the Great War have performed a crucial … Read moreSubverting Misconceptions about the Great War: Henri Barbusse’s “Under Fire” and Erich Maria Remarque’s “All Quiet on the Western Front”

A Universal Loss of Innocence: Remarque’s “All Quiet on the Western Front”

Title: A Universal Loss of Innocence: Remarque’s “All Quiet on the Western Front”Author: Katherine PerryWords: 1,139Written: January 23, 2009Paul Bäumer lives in a world where killing is the only way to live, memories are as foreign as the enemy himself, and a single bombardment can age a man fifty years. He lives in a world … Read moreA Universal Loss of Innocence: Remarque’s “All Quiet on the Western Front”

Dehumanisation, Death, Destruction

Remarque’s account of the horrors of the Western Front in World War I, from the common German soldier’s perspective, is a poignant reminder of the horrors of war. Dehumanisation, death and destruction are the key themes are relayed through the eyes of Paul Baumer, a soldier in the Great War of 1914-1918 and the narrator … Read moreDehumanisation, Death, Destruction

Ordinary Men and Women: What We Can Learn from Non-Traditional Sources

History, always open to interpretation, is not merely limited to the traditional sources. It can be viewed through forms such as fiction, autobiography, or journalistic memoir, as demonstrated by Erich Remarque’s All Quiet on the Western Front, Primo Levi’s Survival in Auschwitz, and Timothy Garton Ash’s The Magic Lantern, respectively. These diverse platforms of portraying … Read moreOrdinary Men and Women: What We Can Learn from Non-Traditional Sources

The Greatest Loss of All: Soldiers’ Loss of Themselves in All Quiet on the Western Front

War is widely regarded as a time of devastation, death, and destruction. Many times, the brave souls that go nobly into war come out completely different, scarred and changed by the horrific events they have witnessed, if they survive. In All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque, Paul Baumer and his comrades … Read moreThe Greatest Loss of All: Soldiers’ Loss of Themselves in All Quiet on the Western Front

Bonds of War: Soldier bonds in “All Quiet on the Western Front”

In stressful situations, people use connections with things to help them overcome the horrors in the situations. In the Military, many soldiers experience very stressful and intense situations. They use connections with cigarettes, fellow soldiers and music to help them get through these situations. In society, people use drugs, alcohol, and friends to help get … Read moreBonds of War: Soldier bonds in “All Quiet on the Western Front”