The Significance of the Parados of the Oresteia

Aeschylus’ Oresteia is undebatably one of antiquity’s greatest surviving tragedies. Driven by the universal struggles of justice versus injustice, fear versus obligation and parent versus child, the play follows one ill-fated family through the passion, hatred and destruction that, through ultimate pain and suffering, eventually purges the lineage and restores honor to their name. Preluded … Read moreThe Significance of the Parados of the Oresteia

Cassandra’s Final Monologue

Cassandra’s final monologue in Aeschylus’s Agamemnon plays a transformative role in terms of the movement of the plot and, upon close examination, functions as a key for many of the tragedy’s larger themes. She begins by equating prophecy, be it the physical act or the emotional ramifications of foreknowledge of events, with intense pain. ³Oh, … Read moreCassandra’s Final Monologue

The Thematic Purpose of the Powerless Underclass in Agamemnon

Marx defines the “underclass” as a social group, conscious of itself, that is being oppressed and exploited by the ruling class and thus possesses a common hostility towards this higher class. This concept is reflected in various literature from throughout history and can also be seen in modern societies all around the world. In Greek … Read moreThe Thematic Purpose of the Powerless Underclass in Agamemnon

Analysis of Tragedy in Agamemnon

Historically, Greek tragedies have been used as a means to convey particular political and ethical testimonials about society, usually in order to convey certain morals or to ensure order. In such chronicles, a protagonist grapples with a particular conflict or sets of conflicts, usually pertaining to some universal moral code. Aeschylus’ The Oresteia, like many … Read moreAnalysis of Tragedy in Agamemnon

Metaphors as Euphemistic Action in Tragedy: Indirection, Staging, and Bloodshed in Agamemnon and Antigone

There is no shortage of violence and death in the stories and myths adapted to the stage by the Ancient Greek tragedians. However, these actions are almost never depicted explicitly onstage: murders play out offstage while the audience is only privy to the sound of the victim’s last cries, characters onstage recount violent events in … Read moreMetaphors as Euphemistic Action in Tragedy: Indirection, Staging, and Bloodshed in Agamemnon and Antigone

Womanlike Power: The Study of Clytemnestra’s Role as a Powerful Female Character in the Patriarchal Greek Society of Agamemnon

In ancient Greek Society women were not regarded as equals with men, they were viewed as inferior and incapable of doing what a man could. They had to act submissive and be under a man’s control and oftentimes could not do or speak on their own will. However, throughout Agamemnon, Clytemnestra plays a variety of … Read moreWomanlike Power: The Study of Clytemnestra’s Role as a Powerful Female Character in the Patriarchal Greek Society of Agamemnon

Orestes’ Sun: Apollo’s Importance to the Oresteia

Spanning an elemental and violent family conflict, The Oresteia by Aeschylus is a trilogy containing the plays Agamemnon, The Libation Bearers, and The Eumenides. As a whole, the trilogy deals with Agamemnon’s murder at the hands of his wife Clytemnestra, Orestes’ revenge on his father’s killers, and his ultimate trial for matricide. Although not present … Read moreOrestes’ Sun: Apollo’s Importance to the Oresteia

Subconcious Motivations and Conscious Triggers of Clytemnestra in Agamemnon

From its first performance in Ancient Greece several centuries ago to present day, Aeschylus’s Agamemnon remains a quintessential example of the definitive Greek tragedy, continually captivating audiences with its progressive depiction of feminine complexity. In the play, women are represented by the anti heroine, Queen Clytemnestra of Mycenae, who in the climax of the first … Read moreSubconcious Motivations and Conscious Triggers of Clytemnestra in Agamemnon