Repetition and the Visual in Beckett’s Act Without Words

The title of Beckett’s play, ‘Act Without Words I’, betrays an immediate awareness of its dual status as a text on a page and as a thing intended to be used for performance. The title, lacking an indefinite article preceding it, could be read either as descriptive: ‘An Act Without Words I’, or as an … Read moreRepetition and the Visual in Beckett’s Act Without Words

Myth, Absurdity, and Human Conditioning in Beckett’s Act Without Words

In Act Without Words (1956), Samuel Beckett strips the human condition to its barest level of existence, the “last extremity of meat – or bones” (Connor 181). The play is no longer than four pages, but, in those few pages, Beckett confronts humanity’s unceasing struggle with its disturbingly absurd, thrown condition. It mimes the thwarted … Read moreMyth, Absurdity, and Human Conditioning in Beckett’s Act Without Words