Clockwork Orange: The Last Chapter

In many ways, the controversial last chapter of Anthony Burgess’ A Clockwork Orange undermines the novel’s fundamental premise. Alex’s unforeseen transformation from a sadistic criminal into a consciously reformed and mature individual is not only poorly explained, but also completely absurd. Therefore, the work as a whole is undoubtedly better without the twenty-first chapter. From … Read moreClockwork Orange: The Last Chapter

The Omitted Chapter

The new American edition of the novel A Clockwork Orange features a final chapter that was omitted from the original American edition against the author’s preference. Anthony Burgess, the novel’s author, provided for the new edition an introduction to explain not only the significance of the twenty-first chapter but also the purpose of the entire … Read moreThe Omitted Chapter

The Dilemma of Free Will in A Clockwork Orange

Following the publication of his most notable work, A Clockwork Orange, Anthony Burgess commented on the function of literature in a mutable society. “ There is not much point in writing a novel unless you can show the possibility of moral transformation, or an increase in wisdom, operating in your chief character.â€? (Burgess viii) Consequently, … Read moreThe Dilemma of Free Will in A Clockwork Orange

The Character of Alex in A Clockwork Orange: What’s He Going to Be Then, Eh?

As both the protagonist and narrator of Anthony Burgess’ A Clockwork Orange, the character of Alex is an intriguing study from start to finish. Specifically, in comparing part one and part three of the novel, Alex’s world, internally and externally, his characterization and travails are shown to be mirror images of each other, both identical … Read moreThe Character of Alex in A Clockwork Orange: What’s He Going to Be Then, Eh?

The Role of Language in A Clockwork Orange

Anthony Burgess wrote A Clockwork Orange in 1962, when the fear of war loomed over everyone’s heads. The youth of that generation were born to be rebels. They felt they needed to counteract the obedient society of the 1950s and sow their own path. Therefore, they created their own kind of youth culture that was … Read moreThe Role of Language in A Clockwork Orange

An Analysis of Youthful Rebellion and Social Change in A Clockwork Orange and The Hunger Games

“Is it better for a man to have chosen evil than to have good imposed upon him?” (Burgess 86). In his 1962 classic A Clockwork Orange, Anthony Burgess explores the concept of dystopian societies by employing his 15-year-old rebellious anti-hero, Alex, to demonstrate the effects of an oppressive and struggling government. Alex in many ways … Read moreAn Analysis of Youthful Rebellion and Social Change in A Clockwork Orange and The Hunger Games

The Issues With Human Progress in Utopian and Dystopian Fiction

Krishan Kumar claims that HG Wells “never wrote a proper utopia, in the strict sense”. This may seem a paradoxical statement in regards to the author famed for being the leading apostle of science utopias, and lends itself to the question: “what is a utopia ‘in the strict sense’?” The term coined by Thomas More … Read moreThe Issues With Human Progress in Utopian and Dystopian Fiction

Philosophical Morality in A Clockwork Orange and The Stranger

Many philosophers have believed for centuries that no intrinsic meaning exists in the universe. From this belief emerged many responses, including absurdism and existentialism. Although all are heavily influenced by the beliefs of Søren Kierkegaard, they have been developed further by the likes of Jean Paul Sartre and Albert Camus himself. Existentialism is the belief … Read morePhilosophical Morality in A Clockwork Orange and The Stranger