Moralistic Language in A Christmas Carol

“These are but the spirit of things that have been.” The metaphorical words of the Ghost of Christmas Past are typical of Dickens’ melodramatic writing style. Set in Victorian England, a time rife with greed and social stratification, Charles Dickens’ novella ‘A Christmas Carol’ unveils his view on the values of the time period not … Read moreMoralistic Language in A Christmas Carol

What is the role of characterisation in ‘A Christmas Carol’?

“If they would rather die, then they had better do it, and decrease the surplus population.” Ebenezer Scrooge’s words encapsulate how he is characterised as a largely disagreeable, morally vacuous man. Silhouetted against the backdrop of Victorian England, a time period rife with avarice and social stratification, the construction of character in Charles Dickens’ novella … Read moreWhat is the role of characterisation in ‘A Christmas Carol’?

The Perfect Christmas in A Christmas Carol

‘A Christmas Carol’ was immediately popular in Victorian England and soon, the rest of the world. It became a cultural icon, sparking a tradition to be read every Christmas Eve in many households. The relevance of the novella, even in the 21st century is testament to its immortality and ability to resonate with people decades … Read moreThe Perfect Christmas in A Christmas Carol

Perceiving the Need for Social Change in “A Christmas Carol”

Dickens’s “A Christmas Carol” is set in Victorian London and tells the story of the transformation of a wicked, miserly Scrooge into a benevolent humanitarian via supernatural intervention. The invited reading persuades readers to accept that despite the gap between rich and poor, inspired individuals are capable of changing society, social change is desired by … Read morePerceiving the Need for Social Change in “A Christmas Carol”

A Secular Christmas: Examining Religion in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol

While in Christianity Christmas maintains certain religious icons that help school boys and girls remember the story of the birth of Christ, had Tiny Tim attempted to recite the Christian myth he likely would have earned a swift stroke of the hickory stick for his ignorance. In a novel chronicling the conversion of a bourgeois … Read moreA Secular Christmas: Examining Religion in Dickens’ A Christmas Carol

Movement Within the Episodes

Like Christmas morning itself – when each present represents a discrete mystery, separate from the last – the Christmas Carol is divided into a set of episodes. The book’s chapters are episodic, with the duration of each spirit a single episode. Within each chapter, there a number of discrete scenes that can be considered separately, … Read moreMovement Within the Episodes

Have a Capitalist Christmas: The Critique of Christmas Time in “A Christmas Carol”

An audience member’s gleeful first-hand account of Charles Dickens’s public reading of “A Christmas Carol” unwittingly exposes an often overlooked contradiction in the story’s climax: “Finally, there is Scrooge, no longer a miser, but a human being, screaming at the ‘conversational’ boy in Sunday clothes, to buy him the prize turkey ‘that never could have … Read moreHave a Capitalist Christmas: The Critique of Christmas Time in “A Christmas Carol”

Hypocrisy in a Christmas Carol: A Study of Scrooge

‘Jacob Marley was as dead as a doornail.’ The celebrated author Charles Dickens accentuates this inert nature of a door nail to the society to 1843 England through his classic novella ‘A Christmas Carol.’ The novella’s titular character, Ebenezer Scrooge, is a product of human hypocrisy. Scrooge accedes to ‘Ignorance’ and ‘Want’ in order to … Read moreHypocrisy in a Christmas Carol: A Study of Scrooge